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yafayu
01-25-2006, 07:21 PM
Hi, i'm a college student with my daily drive 87 RWD corolla and my dad thinks that my corolla is danger on the street because it's light and rusted...so he offer me $10000 CAD to buy a better car.

since i really like BMW's(can't tell you how much i love BMW's:thumbup: )i'm thinking any E36 3 series with 6 cylinder, manual tranny, doesn't matter sedan/coupe...but problem comes...people say europe cars tend to have more expensive maintenance than japanese cars so i want to know i'm a college and yes i have a part time job and live by myself..can i afford a e36 3xx?

how much more is bmw maintenance compare to japanese cars? are they really expensive or still affordable? what should i check on these used bmw's? any good/bad about E36?

thank you for help!!

AzNMpower32
01-25-2006, 08:04 PM
I've heard the e36 had a bunch of reliability issues, moreso than the e46. Purists argue the e36 was the best driving 3 series, but the e46 isnt bad and I think you can get a reasonable price on a e46 3-series. Make sure the title is clean, and have a mechanic inspect any used BMW. Parts (and labor) are very expensive compared to a jap car. If nothing breaks or nothing serious happens, you may get along fine. The $$$$$ comes when someone major breaks and BMW parts are very expensive along with the labor. Coming from a japanese car, it might seem expensive. However, compared to other german brands, its not out of the ordinary.

Just an example: An oil change at the dealer is around $80. 4-wheel rotation and balancing on our X3 cost $48.

Fast Bob
01-25-2006, 08:17 PM
Virtually any car, regardless of brand, can become a money pit....in most cases, the older and higher-mileage the car, the greater likelyhood of trouble exists. If you can find something that was owned and maintained by a fellow enthusiast, so much the better....most of the most obvious and critical items will probably have been attended to. Good luck in your search.

Regards,
Bob

freakishpower
01-25-2006, 09:04 PM
i wouldnt get any m3's with a 10k budget...i wouldnt buy an m3 for anything less than 9k if you can find one for that price...but would have high miles no doubt

Boile
01-25-2006, 09:12 PM
Look for the newest and lowest mileage 318ti that you can find. I think they stoped making them in 1999. It should fit in your $10K budget and will be a blast.

e60lover
01-25-2006, 09:15 PM
:eek:

Trust me like someone said earlier e36's had tons of reliability issues. I bought my 1996 328i new in '96 and the first week it left me stranded. Tons of little nagging problems like turn-signal falling out etc. Maybe I just got a lemon but I think that an e46 would be a better choice. Don't get me wrong but the e36 is what got me into BMW's and was a great driver :) . Short and sweet- If you own an older bimmer do the work yourself or find a cheaper indapendant mechanic, do not go to the dealer they will charge you big time, especially for an older car that they don't carry the parts reguarly. Good luck, and I wish you a trouble free experience for your new car.



-e60lover:thumbup:

Pinecone
01-26-2006, 02:07 AM
Problem is ti's go for premium prices. You can pick up a 318i for less.

Check the E36 forums (even the E36 M3 forum) for mileage based issues. If you can do your own work, not super expensive.

Also look at E30s. Chepaer initial cost, leaves you with some leftover money for maintenance and mods. Also a bit more reliable due to less electronics.

But while labor in BMWs can be high at dealers, most parts (but not all) are fairly reasonably priced.

akhbhaat
01-26-2006, 03:18 AM
There is no such thing as a $10,000 (Canadian or USD alike) BMW: the less you pay to purchase the car outright, the more you'll pay back in repairs with each successive year that you own the car. Think of it as a form of financing...with interest, of course...

Of course, there are a couple "sweet spots" which occur once you've replaced most of the more expensive components (PS pump, radiator, A/C compressor, tranny if it's an automatic). Usually this is between 125k-175k miles.

There are some exceptions, of course, but finding them is more or less a matter of luck. I generally encourage friends of mine with such a budget to find a 318ti, because for whatever reason, those seem to hold together much better than the other E36 cars. Everybody I know that owns or has owned a 318ti has had a good experience with it. You don't want an M3. You'll get killed in repairs.

The E46 is also more reliable than the typical E36 (especially electronically), but the E46 is out of your budget.

tcoz
01-26-2006, 03:48 AM
Hi, i'm a college student with my daily drive 87 RWD corolla and my dad thinks that my corolla is danger on the street because it's light and rusted...so he offer me $10000 CAD to buy a better car.

since i really like BMW's(can't tell you how much i love BMW's:thumbup: )i'm thinking any E36 3 series with 6 cylinder, manual tranny, doesn't matter sedan/coupe...but problem comes...people say europe cars tend to have more expensive maintenance than japanese cars so i want to know i'm a college and yes i have a part time job and live by myself..can i afford a e36 3xx?

how much more is bmw maintenance compare to japanese cars? are they really expensive or still affordable? what should i check on these used bmw's? any good/bad about E36?

thank you for help!!
My advice to you would be the same as it was to my son in exactly the same position a couple of years ago. For $10k, you can't buy a CPO, so you'll be on your own for maintenance and repairs, both of which are very expensive unless you can do the work yourself or know of a good experienced independent BMW shop.

I think you'd be better off buying something more current and less costly to maintain right now(my son wound up with a '95 Saturn--great car and really inexpensive), and then when you graduate and get that first job, move up to a more current CPO BMW which you'll likely be able to pick up for low $20's.

Just some father-to-son advice. Good luck

ktc
01-26-2006, 03:50 AM
Maybe I'm the odd conservative one here, but to me it sounds like you should wait a few years before you buy the BMW. Get a used, older car right now that is reliable, and sell it for a small loss after a few years once you're out of college. Once you start with a full-time job, then buy the BMW of your dreams. :thumbup:

My rationale comes from the fact that any repairs to the BMW may become cost prohibitive for you right now. Again, I'm being conservative, but I would say that you should have double the amount ($20k CAD) allocated for buying and maintaining the BMW over the next 4-5 years. You wouldn't want to sacrifice too much of the other parts of your life just to maintain a car... it gets annoying quite fast. So unless you have a solid financial margin, I wouldn't risk buying something with a known high-cost of repairs.

Just my $0.02.

ps. Why not save a bit more now, and once you're out of college buy a used M3? :)

alpinewhite325i
01-26-2006, 04:20 AM
I have to agree with some of the others.

Unless Dad is willing to infuse alot of money into this BMW, I would pass. BMW's cost more than your typical Japanese car to keep on the road. As a college student, you should focus your energy elsewhere.

After you graduate, treat yourself to a brand new Bimmer!

Chris90
01-26-2006, 05:05 AM
If you already have an AE86 Corolla, that's probably just as much fun as any E36, but yeah, it's probably less survivable. That's imo a stupid reason to buy a car though - I think your chance of getting injured in an accident is more dependent on how responsive the car is, and less on how well built it is. A car like the AE86 (an a small BMW) is going to keep you more involved with your surroundings than a big, soft, isolated car or SUV. It's also a smaller target. Car companies try to mislead us with statistics about what happens if you actually have an accident, but ignore those about accident frequency. Nobody survives plane crashes, does that mean planes aren't safe?

But anyway, I'm surprised people are saying E46s are more reliable - my E36 never had ignition coil problems, or any engine problems - we'll see when E46s are 10 years old how reliable they are. I'd guess a lot less than current E36s.

Assume $2000/year for maintenance (at an independent - $3k at a dealer) on a good E36. Personally I'd keep the Corolla til you have a steady job - unless you can find an E36 with a well known history.

Chris90
01-26-2006, 05:08 AM
I think you'd be better off buying something more current and less costly to maintain right now

Remember guys, he has an AE86 Corolla already - they're very reliable and a blast to drive.

Boile
01-26-2006, 06:21 AM
Problem is ti's go for premium prices. You can pick up a 318i for less.

I don't see why a E36ti, compared with a same mileage, condition and year bigger brother E36i, would command a premium. Although the engine and most of the body is the same, the former has a decisively cheaper interior and lacked the more complex (supposedly better) rear suspension of the latter. The hatch door was a great feature, but not appreciated enough by American buyers, or it would not have been withdrawn from the US market.

xspeedy
01-26-2006, 06:50 AM
For a college student with that kind of money, you need to stick to Japanese brands - reliable and relatively cheap given the quality and longevity.

Get yourself a BMW when you have a job to fund the upkeep.

yafayu
01-26-2006, 08:05 AM
Thank you for help!!

what's a CPO?

and i'm surprise someone know my AE86 Corolla, yes ae86 is a "smaller" bmw..very reliable and never cost me lots money to fix, and i think it's a pure car to drive(no ABS, 4 disc break, no power windows, no power everything..only thing keep me it's a RWD car) also this little fun RWD car is what bought me into bmw's

i'm looking for something more like a family car/sports car and sometime i can drive on highway and go camping but if you tell me to buy a accord/civic/camary then rather buy a FWD car i'd save up money to buy a BMW:thumbup: from the day i drove first RWD, i think only BMW can satisfied me..:) :)

thank you guys all! i think i need more time to make a decision, my dad haven't give me the money anyways....;) ;)

Mister Chow
01-26-2006, 08:37 AM
Certified Pre Owned

I agree with what everyone above has said. If and when you get your BMW you'll want to take care of it properly. And that means 6.5l of quality sythetic oil instead of a $29.99 Mr. Lube oil change, premium fuel always, snow tires, water pump, timing belt etc. Tough expenses when you're in school. Or lined up at the Brunswick House ;)

Don't taint your first BMW experience by cutting corners. Save up, get the one you want and give it the love it deserves.

Chris90
01-26-2006, 01:14 PM
I don't see why a E36ti, compared with a same mileage, condition and year bigger brother E36i, would command a premium. Although the engine and most of the body is the same, the former has a decisively cheaper interior and lacked the more complex (supposedly better) rear suspension of the latter. The hatch door was a great feature, but not appreciated enough by American buyers, or it would not have been withdrawn from the US market.

Supply and demand. There are few out there, and they make great project cars. Throw in a 3.2L M3 motor in there and you have quite a rare beast. I'd say they go for the same price as an equivalent vintage 328.

Chris90
01-26-2006, 01:22 PM
Thank you for help!!

what's a CPO?

and i'm surprise someone know my AE86 Corolla, yes ae86 is a "smaller" bmw..very reliable and never cost me lots money to fix, and i think it's a pure car to drive(no ABS, 4 disc break, no power windows, no power everything..only thing keep me it's a RWD car) also this little fun RWD car is what bought me into bmw's


Everyone I know of who sold their AE86 regretted it, so keep it and save up for a nice E30 or E36 when you're out of school.

http://driftday.com/taka_2005ae86.jpg

eelnoraa
01-26-2006, 01:58 PM
For a college student with that kind of money, you need to stick to Japanese brands - reliable and relatively cheap given the quality and longevity.

Get yourself a BMW when you have a job to fund the upkeep.


This is exactly what I want to say. As a college student, don't spend your energy maintainning your car. Do well in school, get a high pay job, you can get much better car in a few years.

For $10, you can get a decent Japanese car, like Accord. They are reliable without heavy maintanance cost.

eel

hockeynut
01-26-2006, 02:02 PM
This is exactly what I want to say. As a college student, don't spend your energy maintainning your car. Do well in school, get a high pay job, you can get much better car in a few years.

For $10, you can get a decent Japanese car, like Accord. They are reliable without heavy maintanance cost.

eel

:stupid:

You are in school - that is your main concern. Get good grades and get a good job...then go buy the bimmer you really want.

For now, take the $10k and get a used Corolla/Civic. And study hard!!!

eelnoraa
01-26-2006, 02:06 PM
Virtually any car, regardless of brand, can become a money pit....in most cases,
Bob

This cannot apply to Japanese car like, Camry/Accord, Corrolla/Civic. When I was starting college back in 97, I purchase a 87 accord for $3000 at 110K miles. Today, it has 230K miles, still running. It is still commute with me twice or three times a week. Only maintanice: timing belt at 130K, regular oil change, 2.5 sets of tires, alternator at 150k, water pump at 170K. It has NOT given me any problem. It is not perfect, but it is a extremely reliable car, and it is not a money pit.

eel

gos
01-26-2006, 02:23 PM
This cannot apply to Japanese car like, Camry/Accord, Corrolla/Civic. When I was starting college back in 97, I purchase a 87 accord for $3000 at 110K miles. Today, it has 230K miles, still running. It is still commute with me twice or three times a week. Only maintanice: timing belt at 130K, regular oil change, 2.5 sets of tires, alternator at 150k, water pump at 170K. It has NOT given me any problem. It is not perfect, but it is a extremely reliable car, and it is not a money pit.

eel

If I were in college, I'd do what you already did before... buy another 10-year-old toyota or honda, for $3000 or whatever.

Do what you did before, you won't regret it.

You should be able to get a '96 toyota for a good price.

--gos

yafayu
01-26-2006, 08:12 PM
but how about a BMW compare to accord? is bmw need more maintenance than japanese cars? sounds like you need to fix them alot to keep them running?

i've searched and found many bmw's between $1-$10000 and 89-95 3 series in Toronto and "look" like they are in good shape(at least NOT rusted like my corolla) or should i take my dad's 10k offer to fix up my corolla(body work=$3000 and more)...

there are many 3 series are in my budget some of them are $4000-$5000 let's say if i got a 94 320i for $5000 how much am i looking for repair?

thanks for help! i'm new to bmw's so got lots question
This cannot apply to Japanese car like, Camry/Accord, Corrolla/Civic. When I was starting college back in 97, I purchase a 87 accord for $3000 at 110K miles. Today, it has 230K miles, still running. It is still commute with me twice or three times a week. Only maintanice: timing belt at 130K, regular oil change, 2.5 sets of tires, alternator at 150k, water pump at 170K. It has NOT given me any problem. It is not perfect, but it is a extremely reliable car, and it is not a money pit.

eel

Uncle Fester
01-26-2006, 08:21 PM
I'm afraid the absolute answer to your question, as many people above have said, is NO, you cannot.

At this stage in your life, get a cheaper, more maintainable car. Get your education over with, get a good job and THEN look for your first bimmer. You will not regret it. At this stage, do not let your emotions rule your purchase.

gos
01-26-2006, 09:17 PM
but how about a BMW compare to accord? is bmw need more maintenance than japanese cars? sounds like you need to fix them alot to keep them running?

i've searched and found many bmw's between $1-$10000 and 89-95 3 series in Toronto and "look" like they are in good shape(at least NOT rusted like my corolla) or should i take my dad's 10k offer to fix up my corolla(body work=$3000 and more)...

there are many 3 series are in my budget some of them are $4000-$5000 let's say if i got a 94 320i for $5000 how much am i looking for repair?

thanks for help! i'm new to bmw's so got lots question

I personally wouldn't spend $3000 to fix your old toyota. I'd buy a 10-yr old "new" one for the same $3-4k, and ask your dad to put the remaining $6k in a CD for you for when you graduate.

eelnoraa
01-26-2006, 09:38 PM
but how about a BMW compare to accord? is bmw need more maintenance than japanese cars? sounds like you need to fix them alot to keep them running?

i've searched and found many bmw's between $1-$10000 and 89-95 3 series in Toronto and "look" like they are in good shape(at least NOT rusted like my corolla) or should i take my dad's 10k offer to fix up my corolla(body work=$3000 and more)...

there are many 3 series are in my budget some of them are $4000-$5000 let's say if i got a 94 320i for $5000 how much am i looking for repair?

thanks for help! i'm new to bmw's so got lots question

I forgot to mentioed a set of brakes. So there were total of 4 repair (brake, timing belt, alternator and water pump), each of them are under $200. Things such as radiator, controll arm, which is often need to be replace in BMW for this kind of milage has never given me problems.

As for reliability and cost of maintainance, the Honda/Toyota do much much better than BMW in these departments. BMW is reliable at a cost. Honda and Toyota are reliable with little to no maintanance. I can garrantee you that to operate any (new or old) BMW for 100K miles will cost a lot more than operate a Accord for the same milage.

If you have to have a BMW, then go ahead. I would wait a few year and get a newer and better car.

eel

Chris90
01-27-2006, 05:23 AM
I personally wouldn't spend $3000 to fix your old toyota. I'd buy a 10-yr old "new" one for the same $3-4k, and ask your dad to put the remaining $6k in a CD for you for when you graduate.

If it was a tuned up AE86 that needed mechanical repairs, I might pay it. But yeah, $3k just to fix rust, no way.

BMWs don't rust like Japanese cars. In a BMW that sees winters every year, it'll just start to appear in 10 years, while a Japanese car will have huge bubbles of rust.

elnoraa's experience notwithstanding, Japanese cars that are in regions where they use salt will go to **** in 10 years. You'll have to replace the radiator, brake calipers, do body work - everything metal that's exposed to salt will need replacing in a mid 90s Japanese car.

If the AE86 is rusting out, get an E30 for $4k, it'll drive similarly, and parts are dirt cheap, plus it's better built than later BMWs. You'll need a good independent or DIY though.

xspeedy
01-27-2006, 06:33 AM
but how about a BMW compare to accord? is bmw need more maintenance than japanese cars? sounds like you need to fix them alot to keep them running?

i've searched and found many bmw's between $1-$10000 and 89-95 3 series in Toronto and "look" like they are in good shape(at least NOT rusted like my corolla) or should i take my dad's 10k offer to fix up my corolla(body work=$3000 and more)...

there are many 3 series are in my budget some of them are $4000-$5000 let's say if i got a 94 320i for $5000 how much am i looking for repair?

thanks for help! i'm new to bmw's so got lots question

If your Corolla is a rusted out heap, don't waste money fixing it. Do one of two things:

1) Keep driving the rusted Corolla (appearances don't matter) and save the $10K to put down on a new BMW when you get a job after graduation.

2) Spend the all or part of the $10K to get a good used Japanese product.

Watchdog
01-27-2006, 04:52 PM
I wouldn't advise buying a Bimmer in your situation

Boxboss
01-27-2006, 05:54 PM
Don't forget the higher cost of insurance and fuel.

icemanjs4
01-28-2006, 04:44 PM
For a college student with that kind of money, you need to stick to Japanese brands - reliable and relatively cheap given the quality and longevity.

Get yourself a BMW when you have a job to fund the upkeep.

xSpeedy, isn't this where you chime in and say "go get yourself an Integra Type R?"

BTW, I agree with most of the others. While you're in college (which shouldn't be too many years), sacrifice a little and buy a cheaper reliable car. Wait until you've been working for 2 or 3 years, and you know what your real budget it - and maybe have a little more savings - then you can get yourself a BMW configured the way you want it (not just what you could eek out on meager college funding).

xspeedy
01-28-2006, 04:53 PM
xSpeedy, isn't this where you chime in and say "go get yourself an Integra Type R?"


Typically this is where I plug my beater. With $10K, I wonder if he could score one of these. Feels very European, and suits college life (great cargo room with seats folded), easy parking... It was a loser in the market, but that could spell a good deal used.

http://automobiles.honda.com/images/2005/civic_si/customize/base_cars/SI_si_34FRONT.jpg

circa
01-31-2006, 10:30 AM
Im in school too, I bought a bimmer and have no regrets. just kept my other car if something goes wrong. Id advise you to do the same, but only if you find a steal of a deal, dont rush.

Storm7
01-31-2006, 11:26 AM
Hi, i'm a college student with my daily drive 87 RWD corolla and my dad thinks that my corolla is danger on the street because it's light and rusted...so he offer me $10000 CAD to buy a better car.

since i really like BMW's(can't tell you how much i love BMW's:thumbup: )i'm thinking any E36 3 series with 6 cylinder, manual tranny, doesn't matter sedan/coupe...but problem comes...people say europe cars tend to have more expensive maintenance than japanese cars so i want to know i'm a college and yes i have a part time job and live by myself..can i afford a e36 3xx?

how much more is bmw maintenance compare to japanese cars? are they really expensive or still affordable? what should i check on these used bmw's? any good/bad about E36?

thank you for help!!
==================
As a father:

-Most sensible - buy the best used you can find Honda civic or Toyota Corolla.
-Most fun - if you don't mind the expense - BMW.

-Buy the most sensible - after you have a good job - get a new sexy BMW.:D

akhbhaat
01-31-2006, 11:57 AM
Honestly, I don't mind the tail lights as they are stock (whereas I couldn't stand the amber lights on the E46), so I'm not sure whether or not I'd be willing to shell out for the blacklines. However, the amber reflectors on the front definitely have to go.