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Solo1
10-09-2006, 11:20 AM
I've been looking for several days, but I cant find IN One Place a comparative discussion of the various Pad designs and their pros and cons.

Some are flat, some are concave.
Some require backing plates, others don't.
Some have exended edges, others don't.
Some pads are two sides, others aren't.

There are probably several other major distinctions among pads I haven't discovered yet. (closed vs open cell, etc.)

Whats a newbie dude to do? :dunno:

I am tryng to make a pad purchase decision, but at least the PC Orbiter is on the way!! :thumbup:

Is there a link that addresses these specific differences? I've been to the 5-6 obvious sites that each push their own pads, but nowhere compares the differences and pros and cons, that I have found.

THanks.

Solo :rofl:

BrianSF
10-09-2006, 01:36 PM
Solo,

Call Detail City (http://www.detailcity.com/index.html) at 877-726-3420 and talk to Dwayne McPeeks (http://www.detailcity.com/about-us.html). I ordered Lake County pads (some of the best in many people's minds) and Dwayne spent a good deal of time with me discsuuing your very questions. The pads have been great and perform exactly as Dwayne indicated.

Brian

Solo1
10-09-2006, 01:54 PM
Thanks Brian.

Why didnt you get the edge 2000 product?

dboy11
10-10-2006, 09:52 AM
Solo,

Call Detail City (http://www.detailcity.com/index.html) at 877-726-3420 and talk to Dwayne McPeeks (http://www.detailcity.com/about-us.html). I ordered Lake County pads (some of the best in many people's minds) and Dwayne spent a good deal of time with me discsuuing your very questions. The pads have been great and perform exactly as Dwayne indicated.

Brian

Scond this Dwayne rocks


you can also see his online forums for some reach

http://www.detailcity.org

MikeyC01
10-10-2006, 11:24 PM
Thanks Brian.

Why didnt you get the edge 2000 product?

Solo,

The Edge 2000 set are the ones to get!! I had traditional velcro backed pads from many manufacturers like Lake Country and Meguiar's. Once I tried the Edge Pads I sold all my other pads.

Foam is foam for the most part and none of the pad manufacturers actually make the foam. They all pretty much get it from the same sources. So quality of foam is pretty universal no matter what brand of pad you buy. The difference at least with velcro pads comes in well the velcro (i.e. how well it is attached and the size of the velcro area). With the Edge pads there is NO VELCRO. So pads can't go flying off or delaminate like velcro pads. Plus Edge pads are double sided and automatically center on the adapter. As the pads automatically center the machine vibrates much less than what you would experience with velcro pads and take it from me the vibrations can be very fatiguing during detailing.

Solo1
10-10-2006, 11:51 PM
Mike -

thanks for the reply!

I took the plunge taking advantage of the Autogeek discount . I did buy the Edge 2000 6 inch pads, as well as the Lake Country 4 inch, low profile pads, and the full line of Menzerna products (32 ox quantities) from Proper Auto care. With the Porter Cable investment and ancillary accessories i've spent $500!

Sure hope I use this stuff!! since I have 3 vehicles Im swure I'll get the value out of this investment.

Best of luck to you and thanks one and all for the advice this week.

Solo :rofl:

MikeyC01
10-11-2006, 08:56 AM
EXCELLENT product choices. The Menzerna polishes are some of the best IMO. Which Menzerna products did you get? IP? FP2? FMJ? P0106FF? You will LOVE the Edge pads they are great. The 6" DA kit from Autogeek is DEFINITELY the way to go. The XMT pad cleaner that comes with it is great. I also have 4" LC pads and they are good, but Aaron over at Edgepads told me they are coming out with 4" pads probably next month. So, I'll be "trading up" into those when they are available.

Also, if the 4" pads you ordered are from the "spot buffs" kit be really careful with the adapter/backing plate that comes with it. I had an "incident" with it which IMO was a product defect . . .

http://www.detailcity.org/forums/car-polishers-buffing-pads-accessories/16138-spot-buffs-kit-warning.html?highlight=spot+buffs

After that happened I bought a yellow backing plate to go with them and they've been fine. Also, part of the reason I switched to Edge pads was because Aaron stands behind his products unlike the way LC treated me in this incident.

Solo1
10-11-2006, 09:57 AM
Mike -

What a nightmare on your Spot Buffs! Fortunately, I bought several low profile pads and the backing plate vs. the kit. Hope that will protect me from what you experienced! Sorry, dude.

Called Autogeek.com.. they said it might be 2 mos before new Edge 4 inch pads come in - and the mould not made yet. So I'll stick with the low profile L.C. pads for now. Shouldn't be too much hassle to switch out adapter for the plate.

Menzerna - got 32 oz versions of IP, FPII, Glaze and FMJ. Autogeek didnt sell it so I got at ProperAutocxare.com. It sounded like the best out there to me in my reading. Is the acryillic necessary / worth it? Didn't buy it. Seems like overkill - 5 layers lol.

Any tricks to applying all that stuff?

Should have enough supplies to last a few years! :thumbup:

Solo :rofl:

MikeyC01
10-12-2006, 01:56 PM
Sounds like you really did your research. I have all the products you mentioned. Personally, I'm not big of using glazes like FTG but it can be a short term fix for light marring if you don't want to polish too often. I don't think you needed the HGAS either. It's more of a FMJ refresher, but FMJ lasts for months anyway.

There's no real trick to using any of this stuff. However, Menzerna polishes tend to flash quicker than other brands. So, before I start each panel I spritz the pad a couple of times with QD to extend the working time of the polish.

Personally, I'm currently using the Pinnacle XMT polishes and they're pretty good. Eventually, I might switch back to Menzerna.

Solo1
10-13-2006, 03:52 PM
Mike -

What does "flash" mean? dry up?

Got all my stuff in today and yesterday. Can't wait to get started! :thumbup:

Added some poorboy's trim restorer 'cause it was mentioned as a good product by someone on this board. The black bumpers and trim on my 535i and 528i are duller than dishwater...but not for long.

Gotta love forums!

See ya soon!!

Solo :rofl:

TOGWT
10-14-2006, 07:37 AM
Foam Pad Types:
Use Constant Pressure™ polishing pads where you want a uniform and constant pressure on the surface being polished, professionals have learned through experience to keep their machines parallel to the surface being polished. Tilting the machine in any direction can result in an uneven and excessive pressure being transferred to the painted surface, or to the foam causing it to tear. Blue "Constant Pressure" foam backing absorbs any unwanted ‘off-axis’ polishing motions (ideal for the inexperienced or neophyte user)

Here's a brief guide to help you select the correct product for your needs, all of these pads have a hook and loop fastening system. The Velcro on both the pad and backing plate allows you to quickly and easily install and remove the pads listed below:-

A flat pad- provides an even pressure so it will takes more pressure to stop the random orbital buffers motor, so the finish is more even. They also produce a ‘feeling’ for the surface that you can gauge better than the variable contact pads, this style pad is best for medium polishing and finishing work.

A constant pressure foam pad- this is essentially a flat pad which uses a patented technology layer of engineered, instant rebound foam between the pad and the backing plate to absorb off-axis movements while keeping the pressure of the pad on the surface constant. It allows even beginners to achieve professional-like results, the curved 6- inch pads outer edge makes transitioning seams and uneven panel breaks easier and the concave "dish" in the centre of the pad reduces product splatter, and gives the operator greater pad control. They are very easy to control, and forgiving of less-than-perfect technique.

A curved edge foam pad- is ideal for working in tight spaces or a surface with lots of curves. Apply the polish to the outer edge of the pad and the PC can be used at more of an angle, the PC generates very little heat so this application method can be used safely, it’s halfway between a flat and VC pad with surface contact. This pad can also be used flat, apply more polish on the peak between the curve and recess, utilizing it like this assimilates a variable contact pad.

A variable contact foam pad- provides focused pressure on a reduced surface contact area using the edges of the pad, making this pad ideal for machine polishing. Be aware that increased surface pressure may cause a PC motor to stall. Variable contact pads are more suitable for use with a high-speed rotary polisher

Tufted foam pad-are made from pre-polymer foam with a 50% open cell structure. This 7.5-inch pad has nine- times the surface area of a flat pad. This dissipates heat, spreads polish over a larger area and reduces polish build-up. This pad is ideal for large surface area polishing, such as the removal of oxidation.

Contoured Edge pad- these 7.5-inch pads have a graduated, concave polish pocket similar to the variable contact foam pads, but with a contoured edge and a recessed area for the backing plate. These pads have four distinct working surfaces (1) flat for polishing (2) they can be ‘lifted’ using the outer 1/3rd of the pad for areas that are tight (3)The outer edge of the pad can be used for seams or corners (4) the underside can be used for polishing around mirrors, badges, emblems or other thigh areas.

MikeyC01
10-16-2006, 05:19 PM
Mike -

What does "flash" mean? dry up?

Got all my stuff in today and yesterday. Can't wait to get started! :thumbup:

Added some poorboy's trim restorer 'cause it was mentioned as a good product by someone on this board. The black bumpers and trim on my 535i and 528i are duller than dishwater...but not for long.

Gotta love forums!

See ya soon!!

Solo :rofl:

Flash does not quite mean "dry up" it's more really a combination of the abrasives in the polish have fully broken down and that the polish has dried up a bit.

I have PB's Trim Restorer as well. It's a great product! Make sure you post up some pictures of your car after you're done detailing it!!!

Solo1
10-16-2006, 07:47 PM
JonM and Mike -

thanks for your responses!

Well, I am ten hours into my "project" with very sore arms. As a first timer at this I am sure I got off to a fairly slow start, but here is a perspective of where I began:

http://www.franklinhome.net/Car%20Fix.html

The ding pics are probably only 5 of 25 or so noticeable sets of scratches, med-light swirls, water marks and mars/rubs. Not counting all the rock dings on the hood.

I am glad to say that all of these marks are removed or reduced to not really visible with a few needing slight touch up paint and re-compounding. Needless to say, I am very happy with the results so far. the process has been:

1) wash

2) clay (last weekend),

3) 4 in. L.C. yellow pad with Intensive Polish on 25 or so pronounced small areas of scratch(es), water marks, pronounced rubs or swirls - Each with 3 passes!

4) 6 inch Orange Edge 2000 pad over 1/5 of car (2-3 passes) with Final Polish II

5) 6 in. Blue Edge 2000 pad over 100% of car with Final Polish II

6) the related removal of compound residue after each of the above passes.....ugh!

WOW, a lot of work when you have so many problem areas to address! I am glad I have so many micro-fibers to call upon!

Now the Question...

Mike you indicated earlier I might not need the Menzerna Glaze product. At this point there is very little to fill.... there are paint chips gone in many spots on front of hood and a few small spots around the car, some shallow scratches where a little white is still visible and a couple spots where very slight indententations remain from scratches that did not fully penetrate the clearcoat initially.

Would the Menzerna Gloss fill any of the above in? Or should I proceed right to FMJ?

I got Menzerna Intensive polish because it didnt have fillers..I wanted to remove the problem, not fill them in with the 3 M or other similarily configured polishes / compounds. But, I don't know at this point if I should use a product that fills in what remains of the best I could do in removing blemishes.....

What say you? or anyone else?

Thanks for you help! I will post final results when I finish..though it may have to be after my trip to N.C. mountains to see leaves change, ride, hike and get fresh air! Ill try to get posted before I travel.

Thanks and good night!!

Solo

MikeyC01
10-16-2006, 10:32 PM
As I mentioned before the glaze will help to fill any remaining imperfections in the paint that you could not or did not want to buff out. The oils in the glaze will also give the paint a slightly wetter look. If you paid for it I would use it. Personally, I have a bottle of it which I used once and never bothered to use a again.

I'm just not a big glaze person. If you do a good job polishing then it really doesn't add anything to the result. It just adds extra work. Plus, the oils in the polish which enhance the wetness will wash away after the first rain or washing.