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mskvarenina
10-13-2006, 11:31 AM
So I've purchased my first BMW. It looks great and I want to keep it that way for a long time. What if anything should be done to it while it's new?

Soe have recommened Klasse's All-in-One for the rims to help keep the brake dust from sticking. Is this true and what else should be done?

dboy11
10-13-2006, 11:56 AM
So I've purchased my first BMW. It looks great and I want to keep it that way for a long time. What if anything should be done to it while it's new?

Soe have recommened Klasse's All-in-One for the rims to help keep the brake dust from sticking. Is this true and what else should be done?

Start with getting the right stuff to work with...a good car soap and a natural sea sponge or lambs wool mitt...I like to use micro fiber towels for drying but good quality terry can do just as well....I would clay the car to start...you can buy a kit at any decent auto parts store...they come with a clay bar and lube that you will need follow the directions on the box...its really quite simple...Mothers, Claymagic, Meguiar's all have good kits...clay is going to remove all the surface containment's....a quick test is get s sandwich baggie and put it on your hand palm side down rub that over the hood of your clean car if you can feel bumps that's what clay is going to take off....

Next Klasse AIO would be good if you are doing this by hand..its a chemical cleaner and on a new car that should be ok to start...I would also recommend a sealant the Klasse SG would be a good choice.

My personal choice is Poorboys World polish with carnauba added and his EX sealants...they are what I use on my car and the detail jobs that I do on the side...you can buy all that I have mentioned from his site...call Steve and tell him that Beemerboy sent you...great guy and top quality products that are very user friendly with a machine and by hand

http://www.poorboysworld.com

mskvarenina
10-13-2006, 02:01 PM
I would clay the car to start...you can buy a kit at any decent auto parts store...they come with a clay bar and lube that you will need follow the directions on the box...its really quite simple...Mothers, Claymagic, Meguiar's all have good kits...clay is going to remove all the surface containment's....

Claying a brand new car? I would think fresh out of the factory it wouldn't need claying as it hasn't been exposed to the elements yet?

dboy11
10-13-2006, 02:14 PM
Claying a brand new car? I would think fresh out of the factory it wouldn't need claying as it hasn't been exposed to the elements yet?

New cars sit in lots while awaiting shipping and then are loaded on trucks, trains, boats, etc They are exposed to all sorts of elements... trust me clay will help this car big time...do the sandwich baggie thing that I described and what you will feel is all the commitments that are on the car....the car can look clean and shiny and still have crud attached to the surface..have a look at when the car was made and when it was delivered to the dealership...in between that time its been sitting outside who knows where...most dealership put a spray on wax that is carnauba based and has fillers in it...this makes the car look shiny and if there are any swirls in it the filler mask that...after a few washes the filler will wash out.

I've detailed cars as a part time biz for the last 30 plus years...I got a good idea about what I am saying and not trying to steer you wrong

highway
10-13-2006, 02:28 PM
I agree about claying a brand new car.

Got my new car August 28th, in all, it was a month of being on a transport, ship, train........plenty of time for the elements to get at the car.

I clayed then waxed my car.........

Good Luck !

TOGWT
10-14-2006, 07:45 AM
Foam Pad Types:
Use Constant Pressure™ polishing pads where you want a uniform and constant pressure on the surface being polished, professionals have learned through experience to keep their machines parallel to the surface being polished. Tilting the machine in any direction can result in an uneven and excessive pressure being transferred to the painted surface, or to the foam causing it to tear. Blue "Constant Pressure" foam backing absorbs any unwanted ‘off-axis’ polishing motions (ideal for the inexperienced or neophyte user)

Here's a brief guide to help you select the correct product for your needs, all of these pads have a hook and loop fastening system. The Velcro on both the pad and backing plate allows you to quickly and easily install and remove the pads listed below:-

A flat pad- provides an even pressure so it will takes more pressure to stop the random orbital buffers motor, so the finish is more even. They also produce a ‘feeling’ for the surface that you can gauge better than the variable contact pads, this style pad is best for medium polishing and finishing work.

A constant pressure foam pad- this is essentially a flat pad which uses a patented technology layer of engineered, instant rebound foam between the pad and the backing plate to absorb off-axis movements while keeping the pressure of the pad on the surface constant. It allows even beginners to achieve professional-like results, the curved 6- inch pads outer edge makes transitioning seams and uneven panel breaks easier and the concave "dish" in the centre of the pad reduces product splatter, and gives the operator greater pad control. They are very easy to control, and forgiving of less-than-perfect technique.

A curved edge foam pad- is ideal for working in tight spaces or a surface with lots of curves. Apply the polish to the outer edge of the pad and the PC can be used at more of an angle, the PC generates very little heat so this application method can be used safely, it’s halfway between a flat and VC pad with surface contact. This pad can also be used flat, apply more polish on the peak between the curve and recess, utilizing it like this assimilates a variable contact pad.

A variable contact foam pad- provides focused pressure on a reduced surface contact area using the edges of the pad, making this pad ideal for machine polishing. Be aware that increased surface pressure may cause a PC motor to stall. Variable contact pads are more suitable for use with a high-speed rotary polisher

Tufted foam pad-are made from pre-polymer foam with a 50% open cell structure. This 7.5-inch pad has nine- times the surface area of a flat pad. This dissipates heat, spreads polish over a larger area and reduces polish build-up. This pad is ideal for large surface area polishing, such as the removal of oxidation.

Contoured Edge pad- these 7.5-inch pads have a graduated, concave polish pocket similar to the variable contact foam pads, but with a contoured edge and a recessed area for the backing plate. These pads have four distinct working surfaces (1) flat for polishing (2) they can be ‘lifted’ using the outer 1/3rd of the pad for areas that are tight (3)The outer edge of the pad can be used for seams or corners (4) the underside can be used for polishing around mirrors, badges, emblems or other thigh areas.

scottscottscott
01-07-2007, 11:22 AM
[QUOTE=dboy11;1964251]Start with getting the right stuff to work with...a good car soap and a natural sea sponge or lambs wool mitt...I like to use micro fiber towels for drying but good quality terry can do just as well....I would clay the car to start...you can buy a kit at any decent auto parts store...they come with a clay bar and lube that you will need follow the directions on the box...its really quite simple...Mothers, Claymagic, Meguiar's all have good kits...clay is going to remove all the surface containment's....a quick test is get s sandwich baggie and put it on your hand palm side down rub that over the hood of your clean car if you can feel bumps that's what clay is going to take off....

Next Klasse AIO would be good if you are doing this by hand..its a chemical cleaner and on a new car that should be ok to start...I would also recommend a sealant the Klasse SG would be a good choice.

My personal choice is Poorboys World polish with carnauba added and his EX sealants...they are what I use on my car and the detail jobs that I do on the side...you can buy all that I have mentioned from his site...call Steve and tell him that Beemerboy sent you...great guy and top quality products that are very user friendly with a machine and by hand

http://www.poorboysworld.com[/QUOTE


I'm picking up my new car next weekend (assuming all goes as planned). I've been going through the detailing threads like crazy and have settled on either Klass or Zaino products to try out.

As indicated above, claying a new car is recommended to get rid of any particles/dirt that might have settled on the car while it sat prior to delivery. As for claying...would one actually clay prior to the initial washing or after?

Thanks!

TOGWT
01-07-2007, 12:28 PM
The info on foam pads was throw in as a bonus (need more coffee)

Now for the new car prep (not all will apply but may be usful for others)

1. RapGard (Plastic Transit Film):
Many manufacturers are using this white plastic covering in place of synthetic or wax based shipping coatings. Plastic becomes brittle with age (90 to 180 days) and becomes difficult to remove as it "shreds" while being pulled off, additionally there maybe excess adhesive residue left on the surface.
Spray Valugard’s New Car Prep onto the Rapgard, allow to dwell for three or four minutes. Remove NCP residue with a 100% cotton towel (DFTowel) The Rapguard should now gently peel off, pull away from body at a 45 degree angle using an even pressure, you may find that it shreds. The ideal paint surface temperature for RapGuard removal is between 600F (150C) to 800F (260C) If the surface temperature is below 600F (150C) removal is best done inside. Spray the uncovered paint surface with New Car Prep to remove any adhesive residue htpp://www.autoint.com

Wash vehicle with a car wash concentrate diluted 1 oz. per gallon of water any remove any ‘solid’ adhesive residue with detailers clay. The product they use is either Cosmoline (used by Porsche amongst others) or a blend of paraffin and a synthetic wax, but it’s mainly paraffin that is used to protect new cars during shipment. They are sprayed on most engine and exterior finishes to provide a barrier to the elements. (Zymöl Strik™ Cosmoline Remover and Engine Cleaner) will remove it-
Product specific - Zymol http://fp.zymol.com/strik2.htm) or AutoBody Prep (http://www.autoint.com)


Most important; protect the finish with a polymer sealant and / or a Carnauba wax
(See also new Polymer Sealant, Polymer Sealant or Waxing New Paint)

2. Cleaning Tyres:
•Rinse thoroughly with a fairly strong stream of clean water to remove any loose road dirt etc., from tyre’s and wheel wells.
•Clean tyres with a rubber cleaner (3M Tire & Wheel Cleaner -39036) or a citrus-based APC (P21S Total Auto Wash)
•Use a water-based polymer tyre dressing (Zaino Z-16 Perfect Tire Gloss™)
•Apply a (UVR) protection to the tyres.

3. Detailers Clay:
Even new cars that have been setting on a car dealerships lot for a few weeks can accumulate surface contamination; don't assume a vehicle that looks good is contamination free
•Divide the Detailer's Clay into equal pieces and knead into a ball to ensure pliability
•Take one of the pieces and flatten it out into a circle, approximately enough that it will fit into two or three fingers
•Spray a 2-foot by 2-foot surface with a 5:1 lubricating solution (Distilled water / WooliteTM or Dreft™ ensure that the surface being clayed is always wet
•Glide the Clay across the area in a front to back in a straight-line aquaplaning type motion
•Use long strokes without lifting the clay from the surface
•Use a light to medium even pressure until the surface becomes smooth and silent.
•If the Clay is streaking on the paint, you need more to apply more lubricating solution, it is better to over lubricate the paint film surface than let it dry-out

4. Vinyl and hard plastic surfaces:
•Apply any dressings very sparingly as these surfaces don’t allow the dressings to penetrate very well
•Use a suitable matte type dressing (Iz Cockpit Premium) to ensure that there is no reflection on the windshield, reducing visibility.
•Apply a UVR protection (303 Space Protectant) especially to the dash and any other surface that is subjected to sunlight on a regular basis.

5. Surface Protection:
Regularly applied wax and/or a polymer sealant will both protect the paint surface from surface contamination that collects on a painted finish which includes, Industrial fallout (IFO), Rail Dust, Acid Rain, Hard Water Spots, Tar, Bird Droppings, Waxes/Silicones, Oxidation, Adhesive Residue, Road Grime Rust Stains. I would seriously consider the purchase of a clear automotive protective coating (aka Clear Bra)

Use Optimum Poli-Seal and white lake county (LC) polishing pad, this one-step product is perfect for the neophyte or experienced detailer, it will make a noticeable improvement on even brand new paint as it will deepen the shine and jetting (wet-look gloss) durability approx. 3-4 months, maintain the shine with Optimum Spray Wax- http://superiorcarcare.net/oppo.html

6. Car Cover:
The greatest treats to the preservation of your vehicle are; Airborne Contaminants, Industrial Fallout (this includes Acid Rain) Ultra Violet Radiation (UVR) Oxidation, Bird Excrement and Brake Dust, wind blown debris and pollution. Protect your investment with a car cover, outdoors, car covers offer unequalled protection against ultra-violet radiation (UVR) they are water resistant and provide protection from acid rain, pollution, bird excrement, tree sap and wind blown debris.

Totoland
01-07-2007, 01:01 PM
So I've purchased my first BMW. It looks great and I want to keep it that way for a long time. What if anything should be done to it while it's new?

Soe have recommened Klasse's All-in-One for the rims to help keep the brake dust from sticking. Is this true and what else should be done?


What the others have said is excellent advice. I'd chime in with learning to properly wash your car. Search the threads on Detail City or Autopia for the correct method. Your wax will definitely last a long time with proper washing.

As far as Klasse on the rims, I would probably use Collinite Insulator Wax (hi-tem sealer that leave a very slick finish and lasts quite a while). Klasse tends to be more of a cleaner than a protectant.

Totoland

Steve335cpe
12-28-2007, 01:43 PM
I bought my 335i coupe a month ago, but weather has been bad. Therefore it has been sitting in the garage and picking up dust. What is the best way to deal with daily maintenance?

dboy11
12-28-2007, 01:49 PM
I bought my 335i coupe a month ago, but weather has been bad. Therefore it has been sitting in the garage and picking up dust. What is the best way to deal with daily maintenance?

If its just surface dust get a California Duster that's what I use....for a car that is a bit dirtier then a waterless wash like Poorboys World Spray and Wipe would be in order...also get some good micro fiber towels and don't cheap out on them...in other words by the nice ones

http://www.poorboysworld.com

dboy11
12-28-2007, 01:50 PM
[QUOTE=dboy11;1964251]Start with getting the right stuff to work with...a good car soap and a natural sea sponge or lambs wool mitt...I like to use micro fiber towels for drying but good quality terry can do just as well....I would clay the car to start...you can buy a kit at any decent auto parts store...they come with a clay bar and lube that you will need follow the directions on the box...its really quite simple...Mothers, Claymagic, Meguiar's all have good kits...clay is going to remove all the surface containment's....a quick test is get s sandwich baggie and put it on your hand palm side down rub that over the hood of your clean car if you can feel bumps that's what clay is going to take off....

Next Klasse AIO would be good if you are doing this by hand..its a chemical cleaner and on a new car that should be ok to start...I would also recommend a sealant the Klasse SG would be a good choice.

My personal choice is Poorboys World polish with carnauba added and his EX sealants...they are what I use on my car and the detail jobs that I do on the side...you can buy all that I have mentioned from his site...call Steve and tell him that Beemerboy sent you...great guy and top quality products that are very user friendly with a machine and by hand

http://www.poorboysworld.com[/QUOTE


I'm picking up my new car next weekend (assuming all goes as planned). I've been going through the detailing threads like crazy and have settled on either Klass or Zaino products to try out.

As indicated above, claying a new car is recommended to get rid of any particles/dirt that might have settled on the car while it sat prior to delivery. As for claying...would one actually clay prior to the initial washing or after?

Thanks!

You always clay after the wash to make sure the surface is clean

Steve335cpe
12-28-2007, 02:04 PM
dboy11

Thanks for the info. Where do you get the poorboy world spray and wipe?

MMME30W
12-28-2007, 02:10 PM
Ditto on the clay bar.

I got a Mother's kit, and basically clay it prior to waxing.

I'm amazed how such a simple thing can make such a difference -- the clay'd surface is mirror gloss smooth, easily different in feel than the freshly washed unclayed surface.

And the thing is, it's so easy to do, really. I just spray (I use a mixture of water and car-wash soap - very light) the panel down then lightly rub the clay (pre-kneaded into a crabby-patty :D ) along the surfact. Amazing, just a light touch produces such nice results.

dboy11
12-28-2007, 02:21 PM
dboy11

Thanks for the info. Where do you get the poorboy world spray and wipe?

http://www.poorboysworld.com