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View Full Version : Winter Prep - what will give the best durability?


KCooke82
10-31-2006, 08:59 PM
Having clayed, polished and applied AIO, I need to decide on winter protection I drive 800miles a week traveling from Boston to Northern New Englad. In other words, my car will see a lot of winter muck.
I'm debating between SG or Z2-Pro on. I like the SG because it can immediately go over AIO in the future and is relatively simple, but I like Zaino because it doesn't need the long cure times. The bottom line is durability, and I am running out of time! What does everyone think? I need to make a move! Thanks everyone!

TOGWT
11-01-2006, 07:13 AM
Winter Vehicle Preparation:
The vehicleís paint system, tyres, glass, plastic and other exterior surfaces will be at the mercy of the elements, including wind, rain, sleet, snow, sand, gravel, and road salt. Autumn is your best opportunity to inspect and prepare your car for the ravages of winter, by providing the exterior paint system with a polymer or acrylic protective layer to provide a durable protection. Your car's paint, tires, leather and rubber trim all need attention, even if you have cared for them all summer.

The steps to take-
Apply a paint protection sealant (Zaino, Carlack / Klasse) for extreme conditions (Collinite #845 Liquid Insulator Wax, will last approximately 4-6 months or 476S Super Doublecoat) http://www.collinite.com/auto.htm
a)Apply dressing to the interior surfaces (especially leather upholstery) Clean and vacuum the carpets (consider a winter matís (WeatherTech) for protection of carpet)
b)Clean, treat, and dress your tyres and apply a wheel surface sealant. Spray the inner wheel wells with (Groitís Satin Black Spray Paint) this will provide a slick layer of protection, which will allow the snow that gets caught up inside there to just fall right off.
c)Change your wipers to winter grade, and make sure your get the transmissionís oil changed to winter grade oil.
d)Have your battery and its charging system checked
e)Fill radiator and windscreen cleaning reservoir with a quality windshield anti-freeze washer fluid.

If you are storing your vehicle for the winter (See Section 17-Vehicle Long-Term Storage)

silverstar
11-01-2006, 09:24 AM
Living in the northeast, we are used to preping our cars for the snow, slush and salty roads of winter.

Best thing you can do to protect your car's finsih is wax! Use quality products like Meguiar's NXT and Zaino. They are synthetic based waxes which tend to hold up longer than Carnuba based products. Then if you get one of those freaky warm days in Jan or Feb, apply another coat for extra protection.

Polish shines the paint, and wax protects it.

silverstar

NH-SHICKS
11-01-2006, 09:38 AM
I have used both Zaino and Klasse SG quite a bit. In my experience. The Z2 Pro with ZFX added holds up better than SG, not to mention the looks are much better. After each wash I hit the paint with Z-8 spray. Also ,use zaino car wash or duragloss wash. Some washes are very strong and can strip sealant more quickly, I find NXT wash to fall into this category, it's great if your car is dirty, but it tends to strip the protection more quickly.

If you decide to use a "WAX" I suggest Meg's #16 or Collinite 845 Insulator wax. I have both. The #16 is a paste with unsurpassed durability and shine, but can be a bit of a pain to use. The 845 is a breeze to use, but a few ticks below in durability IMHO.

NXT Tech wax is not a very durable product, but it is very easy to use, and gives decent looks.

Feel free to ask any questions. The biggest problem in the winter for me is washing. It's tough when your car is caked with salt and sand.

Steve

BrAdam's
11-01-2006, 02:07 PM
Most paste waxes are much more durable than a liquid-based wax. I would use one that is more synthetic based since you will be doing alot of winter driving. Also try and keep the salt, sand or ash off of the surface. If you get a chance on a fairly warm day, go out and apply another coat for extra Protection:thumbup:

Good Luck

NH-SHICKS
11-01-2006, 02:51 PM
Most paste waxes are much more durable than a liquid-based wax. I would use one that is more synthetic based since you will be doing alot of winter driving. Also try and keep the salt, sand or ash off of the surface. If you get a chance on a fairly warm day, go out and apply another coat for extra Protection:thumbup:

Good Luck

These days that statement is tough to backup. Wheather paste or liquid does not really matter. I have tried tons of last step products with varying results regards what the mfg. claims are. The most important thing is a properly prepped paint surface for any wax or sealnt to perform it's best.

My 4Runner on Klasse SG.
Hood - http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a29/SMHICKS/resize.jpg
Side - http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a29/SMHICKS/Picture077.jpg

E46 with Red Machine Glaze and Collinite 845
Hood - http://i8.photobucket.com/albums/a29/SMHICKS/RMG2.jpg

Steve

BrAdam's
11-01-2006, 06:03 PM
These days that statement is tough to backup. Wheather paste or liquid does not really matter. I have tried tons of last step products with varying results regards what the mfg. claims are. The most important thing is a properly prepped paint surface for any wax or sealnt to perform it's best.


Steve

Steve,

I am not shooting down liquid waxes what so ever. There are many companies out there that produce liquid sealers that do a fine job. Most "old School" detailers recognize paste wax to last longer than liquid. Many companies still use Meguiars#16 paste, because of its extreme durability, though can be hard to use. Most professionals know a Paste Wax contains more solids. Those solids add durability, and can also hide imperfections a little more. Paste Waxes are more difficult to use than the cream/ liquid products. But over the past couple of years, there has been many improvements in the longevity of waxes and sealers as well as there ease of use.

But no matter what, after living in the northeast for 20 years, the amount of junk state highway crews apply whether it be salt, sand, or chemicals; they can take a toll on your paint no matter what stuff you use. The important thing is to try and keep all that junk off your car if at all possible.

chuck92103
11-01-2006, 06:05 PM
I drive 800miles a week traveling from Boston to Northern New Englad.

Holy smokes.:yikes: I guess you are not a lease candidate. :rofl:

KCooke82
11-01-2006, 07:20 PM
Haha, you could say that again. I'm in sales with a travel territory, and with a girlfriend that is an hour and a half away.
I'm still on the fence between SG and doing the Zaino route. Any last thoughts?

TOGWT
11-02-2006, 01:27 AM
Winter Vehicle Preparation:
The vehicleís paint system, tyres, glass, plastic and other exterior surfaces will be at the mercy of the elements, including wind, rain, sleet, snow, sand, gravel, and road salt. Autumn is your best opportunity to inspect and prepare your car for the ravages of winter, by providing the exterior paint system with a polymer or acrylic protective layer to provide a durable protection. Your car's paint, tires, leather and rubber trim all need attention, even if you have cared for them all summer.

The steps to take-
Apply a paint protection sealant (Zaino, Carlack / Klasse) an LSP for extreme conditions Collinite #845 Liquid Insulator Wax, will last approximately 4-6 months or 476S Super Doublecoat - http://www.collinite.com/auto.htm
a)Apply dressing to the interior surfaces (especially leather upholstery) Clean and vacuum the carpets (consider a winter matís (WeatherTech) for protection of carpet)
b)Clean, treat, and dress your tyres and apply a wheel surface sealant. Spray the inner wheel wells with (Groitís Satin Black Spray Paint) this will provide a slick layer of protection, which will allow the snow that gets caught up inside there to just fall right off.
c)Change your wipers to winter grade, and make sure your get the transmissionís oil changed to winter grade oil.
d)Have your battery and its charging system checked
e)Fill radiator and windscreen cleaning reservoir with a quality windshield anti-freeze washer fluid.

If you are storing your vehicle for the winter (See Section 17-Vehicle Long-Term Storage)

MikeyC01
11-02-2006, 07:48 AM
I live in New England too, but I don't put anywhere near the amount of miles on my car that you do. In fact, I think you'd be hard pressed to find someone else that drives that many miles.

Anyway, originally my plan was to use a sealant to protect my car during the winter. However, I HATE the look of a sealant. So, I recently bought some Collonite 845. Wow! The look of this wax is DEEP and WET. Plus, it leaves a properly prepped surface quite slick. I was very impressed since everyone only ever talks about the durability of this wax. Well, if this wax lives up to the hype of how durable it is then I will be using it every winter going forward.

NH-SHICKS
11-02-2006, 08:10 AM
Steve,

I am not shooting down liquid waxes what so ever. There are many companies out there that produce liquid sealers that do a fine job. Most "old School" detailers recognize paste wax to last longer than liquid. Many companies still use Meguiars#16 paste, because of its extreme durability, though can be hard to use. Most professionals know a Paste Wax contains more solids. Those solids add durability, and can also hide imperfections a little more. Paste Waxes are more difficult to use than the cream/ liquid products. But over the past couple of years, there has been many improvements in the longevity of waxes and sealers as well as there ease of use.

But no matter what, after living in the northeast for 20 years, the amount of junk state highway crews apply whether it be salt, sand, or chemicals; they can take a toll on your paint no matter what stuff you use. The important thing is to try and keep all that junk off your car if at all possible.

I hear ya, I am having great luck with zaino right now. My car never seems dirty. I have #16 on my 4Runner and it will go strong for the winter, but it does not look clean, seems to attract a lot of dust. I use 845 on our black boat, I have not seen how well it held up this year, last year I used SG but it was a pain on black single stage paint.

Steve

laidback
11-04-2006, 08:28 PM
Zaino gets my vote:thumbup:

Johnz3mc
11-04-2006, 10:49 PM
TOGWT's #1 contains the winter winner: Collinite 845 or 476. I used 845, the insulator wax last winter and it performed admirably, this winter I'm trying the 476 not because I was displeased with 845, but I'm in a continual test mode.
-John C.

guitarman
11-05-2006, 12:25 PM
Just finished preparing for the winter with a coat of Klasse AIO. KISS Alive I on the 8-track stereo in the garage and a beautiful fall day. Doesn't get much better than that.

TOGWT
11-06-2006, 07:57 AM
Steve,

I am not shooting down liquid waxes what so ever. There are many companies out there that produce liquid sealers that do a fine job. Most "old School" detailers recognize paste wax to last longer than liquid. Many companies still use Meguiars#16 paste, because of its extreme durability, though can be hard to use. Most professionals know a Paste Wax contains more solids. Those solids add durability, and can also hide imperfections a little more. Paste Waxes are more difficult to use than the cream/ liquid products. But over the past couple of years, there has been many improvements in the longevity of waxes and sealers as well as there ease of use.

But no matter what, after living in the northeast for 20 years, the amount of junk state highway crews apply whether it be salt, sand, or chemicals; they can take a toll on your paint no matter what stuff you use. The important thing is to try and keep all that junk off your car if at all possible.

Quote: I am not shooting down liquid waxes what so ever. There are many companies out there that produce liquid sealers that do a fine job. Most "old School" detailers recognize paste wax to last longer than liquid...Ē

Paste Wax vs. Liquid Wax:
Most chemists agree that when it comes to a wax formulation there is no advantage between pastes, creams or liquids. It has more to do with production cost and marketing than; ease of application or removal, its protection or surface gloss abilities. The only ingredients that will make a difference is wax quality and percentage content, and its carrier system (i.e. type of solvent / silicone and / or mineral oils used)

Paste wax is just a thicker form of liquid wax, a different consistency, not necessarily even more or less solvents. Some wax products use an emulsion (oil-in water) to keep more liquid without adding solvents which, in high concentrations could affect durability as it would dilute the wax content.

I've often wondered where the 'paste wax to last longer than liquid' originates from?