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View Full Version : Help!!! Really bad water spots...


jtmililani808
11-01-2006, 07:54 PM
I just received my car a few days ago from Matson. When I picked up the car, I noticed some dried salt apparently from the ocean transit. I went straight to the detailer and was horrified with the news that the salt water etched water spots all over my hood.

I tried using a mild polishing compound and claying the car to no avail. The spots disappeared, and after a downpour, they came back. I heard one option is to take it to a body shop or professional detailer to use an orbital buffer on the hood.

My question is if I go that deep into the paint, will the clearcoat still be maintained? Are there any downsides? If anyone can offer advice regarding procedures and products to get out really deep water spots, I would be very greatful!

TOGWT
11-02-2006, 01:31 AM
Removing etched below surface (Stage Two Corrosion) acidic spots from paint-
Once ozone, water and industrial fall out (IFO) become mixed together and heat is added it becomes acid rain, the pH of rainwater; Pure-7.0, Normal 5.5, Acid rain 3.5-4.0. Heat (vehicle paint temperature of 90oF+) creates a very aggressive reactivity when ozone (oxygen) is present, which causes etching (a concave circular mark)

Methodology
•These can be removed by using detailer's clay to remove any hardened surface deposits
•Then using a machine polish ( Optimum Polish, Optimum Compound, Z-PC Fusion Dual Action Paint Cleaner or Klasse All-In-One ) and a cutting (LC Orange or Yellow) foam pad (speed # 4-5.0 ) to level the surface
•Work on a very small area at a time (2-foot x 2-foot) until the polish has run out
•Repeat this process two or three times, as necessary
•Reapply surface protection once spots have been removed.
•If none of the above methods remove the etched water spots consider wet-sanding the paint finish
(See also Wet Sanding)

BrAdam's
11-02-2006, 08:00 AM
Use a clay bar first. Then use a random orbit buffer (Which will not cause damage to the clearcoat or paint) and some mild polish. You can have a body shop do it or you can do it yourself. Always use a less-abrasive pad first and slowly work your way up to aggresive if needed.

Water marks are generally easy to remove, if you have the right tools or pay someone else to do it. The very last resort would to wet sand, but I would leave that to some one who has a Ph D in body work.

Steamroller
11-02-2006, 08:06 AM
You a clay bar first. Then use a random orbit buffer (Which will not cause damage to the clearcoat or paint) and some mild polish. You can have a body shop do it or you can do it yourself. Always use a less-abrasive pad first and slowly work your way up to aggresive if needed.

Water marks are generally easy to remove, if you have the right tools or pay someone else to do it. The very last resort would to wet sand, but I would leave that to some one who has a Ph D in body work.


I agree. I had a ton of burned in water marks on my Black 740 when I bought it. I used a PC 7424 and the EDGE orange pad with some regular polish. No more spots and it looks great. :thumbup: