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X3NC
11-26-2006, 09:15 AM
I am about to pick up my new x3, I am NOT getting the teflon simonize, due do the fact its lease, and IT WILL go back in 3 years. BUT I want to make it look good and winter is basically here. Granted I live in raleigh NC....so what do you recomend? and when do you recomend I do it? Should I wait before I start anything like that?:dunno:

TOGWT
11-26-2006, 09:30 AM
As this will be a lease vehicle a clear bra and car cover might be considered optional, it would depend upon what the dealership considers "Fair wear and tear" on the vehicle at the end of the lease...


New vehicle, Initial Care:
Most people believe that a new car needs little if any care for the first week or so, not true. Most new vehicles leave the factory, they sit in dirt parking lots, they are transported by trains, trucks, or ships, and then they are generally subjected to the removal of transit plastic protection wrap and usually harsh washing conditions once they arrive at the car dealership.

Even new cars that have been setting on a car dealerships lot for a few weeks can accumulate surface contamination; don't assume a vehicle that looks good is contamination free Acid rain, road salt; tree sap and airborne contaminants are very detrimental to a vehicles paint film surface. Brake dust or rail dust are very small, almost microscopic particles of steel, iron or their alloys.

These particles carry a negative charge while the vehicles they land on are carrying a positive charge. The vehicle surface becomes a magnet, attracting and bonding the ferrous metal particles to the vehicle surface, once you add water (dew, rain, humidity, etc) any of the microscopic particles of steel, iron that have compromised the paint surface will cause rust contamination

1. RapGard (Plastic Transit Film):
Many manufacturers are using this white plastic covering in place of synthetic or wax based shipping coatings. Plastic becomes brittle with age (90 to 180 days) and becomes difficult to remove as it "shreds" while being pulled off, additionally there maybe excess adhesive residue left on the surface.
Spray Valugard***8217;s New Car Prep onto the Rapgard, allow to dwell for three or four minutes. Remove NCP residue with a 100% cotton towel (DFTowel) The Rapguard should now gently peel off, pull away from body at a 45 degree angle using an even pressure, you may find that it shreds. Spray the uncovered paint surface with New Car Prep to remove any adhesive residue htpp://www.autoint.com

Wash vehicle with a car wash concentrate diluted 1 oz. per gallon of water any remove any ***8216;solid***8217; adhesive residue with detailers clay. The product they use is either Cosmoline or a blend of paraffin and a synthetic wax, but it***8217;s mainly paraffin that is used to protect new cars during shipment. They are sprayed on most engine and exterior finishes to provide a barrier to the elements. (zym***246;l Strik***8482; Cosmoline Remover and Engine Cleaner ) will remove it-
Product specific - Zymol http://fp.zymol.com/strik2.htm) or AutoBody Prep (http://www.autoint.com)

2. Cleaning Tyres:
***8226;Rinse thoroughly with a fairly strong stream of clean water to remove any loose road dirt etc., from tyre***8217;s and wheel wells.
***8226;Clean tyres with a rubber cleaner (3M Tire & Wheel Cleaner -39036) or a citrus-based APC (P21S Total Auto Wash)
***8226;Use a water-based polymer tyre dressing (Zaino Z-16 Perfect Tire Gloss***8482;)
***8226;Apply a (UVR) protection to the tyres.

3. Detailers Clay:
Even new cars that have been setting on a car dealerships lot for a few weeks can accumulate surface contamination; don't assume a vehicle that looks good is contamination free
***8226;Divide the Detailer's Clay into equal pieces and knead into a ball to ensure pliability
***8226;Take one of the pieces and flatten it out into a circle, approximately enough that it will fit into two or three fingers
***8226;Spray a 2-foot by 2-foot surface with a 5:1 lubricating solution (Distilled water / WooliteTM or Dreft***8482; ensure that the surface being clayed is always wet
***8226;Glide the Clay across the area in a front to back in a straight-line aquaplaning type motion
***8226;Use long strokes without lifting the clay from the surface
***8226;Use a light to medium even pressure until the surface becomes smooth and silent.
***8226;If the Clay is streaking on the paint, you need more to apply more lubricating solution, it is better to over lubricate the paint film surface than let it dry-out
4. Vinyl and hard plastic surfaces:
***8226;Apply any dressings very sparingly as these surfaces don***8217;t allow the dressings to penetrate very well
***8226;Use a suitable matte type dressing (Iz Cockpit Premium) to ensure that there is no reflection on the windshield, reducing visibility.
***8226;Apply a UVR protection (303 Space Protectant) especially to the dash and any other surface that is subjected to sunlight on a regular basis.

5. Surface Protection:
Regularly applied wax and/or a polymer sealant will both protect the paint surface from surface contamination that collects on a painted finish which includes, Industrial fallout (IFO), Rail Dust, Acid Rain, Hard Water Spots, Tar, Bird Droppings, Waxes/Silicones, Oxidation, Adhesive Residue, Road Grime Rust Stains. I would seriously consider the purchase of a clear automotive protective coating (a.k.a.Clear Bra)

6. Car Cover:
The greatest treats to the preservation of your vehicle are; Airborne Contaminants, Industrial Fallout (this includes Acid Rain) Ultra Violet Radiation (UVR) Oxidation, Bird Excrement and Brake Dust, wind blown debris and pollution. Protect your investment with a car cover, outdoors, car covers offer unequalled protection against ultra-violet radiation (UVR) they are water resistant and provide protection from acid rain, pollution, bird excrement, tree sap and wind blown debris.

gbelton
11-26-2006, 09:55 AM
Put on a coat of Zymol-by hand and you will be fine for the Winter.:thumbup:

All that other extra work is a Summer time exercise.

And the tyres should be cleaned as often as necessary [hand towel or car wash with rim blaster]

ajfB004
11-26-2006, 10:08 AM
Stick with Klasse or Menzerna
I use Klasse AIO and SG
Browse the detail forum and you will find a lot of people use different products but Klasse and Zaino seem to be the favorites for protection and finish

gbelton
11-26-2006, 10:19 AM
I have heard the Zaino stories too. I might have to try it but after comparing Zymol to a Zaino coat, I wasn't impressed.

That other stuff you refer too, I'll check it out but Zymol remains king for me!:thumbup:

TOGWT
12-01-2006, 08:05 AM
Put on a coat of Zymol-by hand and you will be fine for the Winter.:thumbup:

All that other extra work is a Summer time exercise.

And the tyres should be cleaned as often as necessary [hand towel or car wash with rim blaster]

Generally you can expect 50% of your Carnauba wax layer to be gone after 30 days, 75% after 60 days and 95% gone after 90 days. You should plan on waxing your car four (4) times a year. You can extend the waxes life expectancy by parking indoors, using a car cover and by using a quick detailer spray (QD) like Pinnacle Crystal Mist. (See also Wax)

Maybe NC has shorter winters than we do in FL...:dunno:

Locksmythe
12-01-2006, 10:50 AM
You have winter in FL?

stream
12-01-2006, 12:22 PM
Generally you can expect 50% of your Carnauba wax layer to be gone after 30 days, 75% after 60 days and 95% gone after 90 days. You should plan on waxing your car four (4) times a year. You can extend the waxes life expectancy by parking indoors, using a car cover and by using a quick detailer spray (QD) like Pinnacle Crystal Mist. (See also Wax)

Maybe NC has shorter winters than we do in FL...:dunno:

And for Zymol, reduce the percentages by half. It has a great shine, but doesn't last worth a... ;)

Totoland
12-01-2006, 01:20 PM
One of the products I use for winter driving is Collinite Insulator Wax. It's basically a sealant and produces a long lasting, very slick surface.

There's a ton of products out there, but this stuff has been around for a lot of years and works well. Collinite also as a marine carnuba that people say is very durable.

Totoland

TOGWT
12-06-2006, 06:46 AM
One of the products I use for winter driving is Collinite Insulator Wax. It's basically a sealant and produces a long lasting, very slick surface.

There's a ton of products out there, but this stuff has been around for a lot of years and works well. Collinite also as a marine carnuba that people say is very durable.

Totoland



Agree, it's one of (if not the) most durable waxes out there :thumbup:

gokartmozart
12-09-2008, 06:58 AM
Give Wolfgang's Deep Gloss sealant a try. From new, the M Coupe was claybarred, Pinnacle 360 XMT polish and Wolfgang's DG. A small bottle has lasted over 4 coats and I just added a synthetic wax over it. Still looks great after 8 months (but I do park inside or car cover and use a detail spray weekly).

dboy11
12-09-2008, 08:30 AM
One of the products I use for winter driving is Collinite Insulator Wax. It's basically a sealant and produces a long lasting, very slick surface.

There's a ton of products out there, but this stuff has been around for a lot of years and works well. Collinite also as a marine carnuba that people say is very durable.

Totoland

Agree, it's one of (if not the) most durable waxes out there :thumbup:

If you living in a cold nasty weather area...this is the product if your not going to be able and get on the car for a few months or more.

For some winter time cleaning without using water...you might think about using some waterless washes..they are life savers in the cold weather...and also great to loosen up the dirt on the rims before wiping them down