PDA

View Full Version : www.****ingbirdpoo.com


TDT
12-13-2006, 08:58 AM
Greetings,

I am planning on starting a web-based business called www.farkingbirdpoo.com. I believe that a lot of the damage the cars paint suffers over the years is due to the acidic properties of the urea and other compounds in bird poo. The website will increase awareness to this problem and suggest numerous ways to deal with it.

One of the ways to avoid poo-related car paint destruction is to take care of it immediately. However, the proper way to do it is not obvious. The website will be sponsoring university research on poo removal and damage prevention using a combination of polymer-based paint coating with unique properties to slow down urea damage. Also the use of alkaline and organic-oil compounds to remove and repair poo damage.

Lastly we will be advocating for the elimination of birds. Joining your local hunting community is a good way to control bird populations without causing local extinction. Endangered species will be protected. The ultimate goal will be a reduction in poo by combining population reduction and a change in bird's diet so that the acidic properties of their poo is ameliorated.

Thank you.

Patrick
12-13-2006, 09:00 AM
This thread is a real turd.


.

TOGWT
12-13-2006, 12:56 PM
Bird Excrement:
(Or insect excrement like Gypsy moth, June bug, Honeybees, etc) contain highly acidic concentrates (uric acid (pH 3.0-4.5) which if left for any length of time the will cause the porous clear coat to occlude (a non-transparent ‘clouded’ area) or may cause etching (a depression in the paint or glass surfaces) Heat (vehicle paint temperature of 90oF+) creates a very aggressive reactivity of the acids that are present, which causes surface etching, so they should be removed without delay, at lower temperatures (40oF or less) there s no reactivity and therefore little or no etching.

No wax or polymer sealant can provide a permanent shield against acidic bird excrement (Collinite 845 Insulator Wax is probably the most durable Carnauba wax product) but this may only provide enough of a barrier to enable it to be removed quickly before causing too much damage to the paint film surface

Birds use gravel to help digest their food so grit and sand are some of the major components, which can cause scratching. Insect honeydew (sometimes mistaken for tree resin) excreted by aphids or scale insects that infest the leaves and branches is also acidic. Residue should be removed (see below) as soon as possible as it could compromise the clear coat.

Take your time and be careful with its removal, these acids should be removed and/or neutralized as quickly as possible. Using an IPA (isopropyl alcohol) no ammonia based (ammonia acts as an acid accelerant) glass cleaner or a gel alcohol hand cleaner (Purell®) place a small amount on to a first aid gauze pad and apply to effected area this will help it stay in place during the necessary dwell time.

The alcohol content acts as a drying agent, which will extract the acid, then thoroughly flush with water to rinse away any grit or sand, etc or use detailers clay to encapsulate it, re-spray the area let it dwell for 2-3 minutes and wipe dry.

Avoid using a QD spray to flush residue, as they contain either carnauba wax or polymer sealants, which will seal the acid and not allow it to dissipate. Using an alkaline rinse of baking soda and water (to neutralize the acid) as soon as is practical is highly recommended, if the affected paintwork is not neutralized any remaining acid residue will be reactivated .If the paint or glass surface has been etched the surface can be levelled with a suitable polish (Zaino PC Fusion Dual Action Paint Cleanser and then apply a paint protection).

Do not scrub hardened/dried excrement residue as it is very abrasive and will scratch the paint surface, once they are softened (re-liquefied) it enables their removal with less likelihood of damage to the paint surface
If the paint can be rectified by chemical means (e.g. acid, concrete, water spotting, etc.) then this is the answer; not abrasive cleaning. Using the correct chemical cleaners will dissolve the contaminants rather than abrading the paint.

The paint system is porous; when you add water and heat to an acidic substance it will erode the paint system very quickly (the heat opens microscopic fissures in the clear coat allowing ingress, the water provides a carrier system for the acid, and heat acts as a catalyst each time water is reintroduced the acid will be reactivated).
The paint surface should be periodically neutralized / decontaminated (See also Reactivity)
Product specific - A, B C Decontamination / Neutralization wash system (http://www.autoint.com )


Knowledge - [We know a subject] [We know where to find information on it] the most highly valued; [knowledge that is both held and shared]

TDT
12-13-2006, 01:57 PM
Bird Excrement:
(Or insect excrement like Gypsy moth, June bug, Honeybees, etc) contain highly acidic concentrates (uric acid (pH 3.0-4.5) which if left for any length of time the will cause the porous clear coat to occlude (a non-transparent ‘clouded’ area) or may cause etching (a depression in the paint or glass surfaces) Heat (vehicle paint temperature of 90oF+) creates a very aggressive reactivity of the acids that are present, which causes surface etching, so they should be removed without delay, at lower temperatures (40oF or less) there s no reactivity and therefore little or no etching.

No wax or polymer sealant can provide a permanent shield against acidic bird excrement (Collinite 845 Insulator Wax is probably the most durable Carnauba wax product) but this may only provide enough of a barrier to enable it to be removed quickly before causing too much damage to the paint film surface

Birds use gravel to help digest their food so grit and sand are some of the major components, which can cause scratching. Insect honeydew (sometimes mistaken for tree resin) excreted by aphids or scale insects that infest the leaves and branches is also acidic. Residue should be removed (see below) as soon as possible as it could compromise the clear coat.

Take your time and be careful with its removal, these acids should be removed and/or neutralized as quickly as possible. Using an IPA (isopropyl alcohol) no ammonia based (ammonia acts as an acid accelerant) glass cleaner or a gel alcohol hand cleaner (Purell®) place a small amount on to a first aid gauze pad and apply to effected area this will help it stay in place during the necessary dwell time.

The alcohol content acts as a drying agent, which will extract the acid, then thoroughly flush with water to rinse away any grit or sand, etc or use detailers clay to encapsulate it, re-spray the area let it dwell for 2-3 minutes and wipe dry.

Avoid using a QD spray to flush residue, as they contain either carnauba wax or polymer sealants, which will seal the acid and not allow it to dissipate. Using an alkaline rinse of baking soda and water (to neutralize the acid) as soon as is practical is highly recommended, if the affected paintwork is not neutralized any remaining acid residue will be reactivated .If the paint or glass surface has been etched the surface can be levelled with a suitable polish (Zaino PC Fusion Dual Action Paint Cleanser and then apply a paint protection).

Do not scrub hardened/dried excrement residue as it is very abrasive and will scratch the paint surface, once they are softened (re-liquefied) it enables their removal with less likelihood of damage to the paint surface
If the paint can be rectified by chemical means (e.g. acid, concrete, water spotting, etc.) then this is the answer; not abrasive cleaning. Using the correct chemical cleaners will dissolve the contaminants rather than abrading the paint.

The paint system is porous; when you add water and heat to an acidic substance it will erode the paint system very quickly (the heat opens microscopic fissures in the clear coat allowing ingress, the water provides a carrier system for the acid, and heat acts as a catalyst each time water is reintroduced the acid will be reactivated).
The paint surface should be periodically neutralized / decontaminated (See also Reactivity)
Product specific - A, B C Decontamination / Neutralization wash system (http://www.autoint.com )


Knowledge - [We know a subject] [We know where to find information on it] the most highly valued; [knowledge that is both held and shared]


You are hired!!!

TOGWT
12-14-2006, 03:33 AM
On the basis of least aggressive first; if the paint can be rectified by chemical means, this is a better solution than abrasive polishing. Using the correct chemical solvent cleaner will dissolve the contaminants rather than abrading the paint. With all cleaning products (especially solvents) always test a small inconspicuous area first to ensure it won't discolour, stain or etch the surface, and ensure that the pH of the product is suitable for the material it’s to be used on. After the paint surface has been subjected to a chemical cleaning its protective layer (s) have been removed and the paint surface left without protection, so it is very important that a polymer and / or Carnauba wax protection be applied immediately.

A safe alternative to abrading acid etching
A B C Decontamination / Neutralization system – http:// www.autoint.com
a three part neutralization and wash system formulated to remove industrial fallout, rail dust, hard water deposits, acid rain residue and other forms of pollutants, this system comprises;
an acid neutralizer, alkaline neutralizer, removes alkaline deposits and ferrous metal fallout.

Use detailer’s clay (medium, medium – heavy grade) during the necessary 5 -7 minuets dwell period to remove ‘water spots’, and a surface cleaner / conditioner ( pH 7.0) which safely removes both surface and subsurface contamination and neutralizes any residual acid from the painted finish, leaving the paint surface uncontaminated and ready for the application of a polish, sealant and / or wax

Product A-Acid Neutralizer removes waxes, storage stains and neutralizes acid deposits, an 8:1 solution that should be allowed to dwell for 5-7 minutes before rinsing off.
Product B-Alkaline Neutralizer removes alkaline deposits and ferrous metal fallout. Ready to use formula that requires a dwell time of 5-7 minutes, use detailer’s clay during the dwell period Tip: clay during the application of the alkaline neutralizer, rinse the bar with water often.
Product C - pH 7.0 Surface Conditioner a 128:1 solution vehicle wash, the third step in the neutralization process that ensures any chemical residues are neutralized and rinsed away.

Note- use separate wash mitt for products A and C, using ValuGard’s dispenser system for these products will ensure correct mix ratio’s and maximum economy. Other prep or reconditioning operations should be performed during product dwell times
(See also Acid Rain & Reactivity)

Alternative products- Finish Kare Paint 119/883 – http//:www.fk1usa.com/decontamination.htm