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Double-S
12-14-2006, 08:29 AM
Just picked up my roadster last week and have been reading the horror stories about swirls & scratches etc. I've searched the forum but can't get a consensus on what is the best way to wash this color. What car wash and applicator would you recommend? How about drying it? Any help would be appreciated!:thumbup:

Tampa335i
12-14-2006, 10:27 AM
Just picked up my roadster last week and have been reading the horror stories about swirls & scratches etc. I've searched the forum but can't get a consensus on what is the best way to wash this color. What car wash and applicator would you recommend? How about drying it? Any help would be appreciated!:thumbup:

I use all Adams products and have had great results on many different colors.

I would use Adams car was with a sheepskin (real) mitt. I would dry it with a wafflewave microfiber towel.

Check out www.adamspolishes.com. They have complete kits you can buy to take care of the car.

Start out with a wash, then clay it, polish and then wax. Use the QD spray to keep it looking great between washes.

BrAdam's
12-14-2006, 03:15 PM
Just picked up my roadster last week and have been reading the horror stories about swirls & scratches etc. I've searched the forum but can't get a consensus on what is the best way to wash this color. What car wash and applicator would you recommend? How about drying it? Any help would be appreciated!:thumbup:

Congrats on the new ride!!:thumbup:

Many people use and have different products and methods to wash and dry their car.

To wash the car I either use a sheepskin pad or if you have a car with lots of emblems or sharp corners, I use a Closed-Cell foam pad which will not catch edges and rip out the fibers. It is also important to make sure the surface is slick, so your not draging any of the dirt across the surface. Another great tool that will help elimate swrils and scratching is a Grit Guard. The Grit Gurad is placed at the bottom of the wash bucket, and you simply just rub the pad or wash mitt across the grid type surface to remove any damaging dirt. The debris falls to the bottom of the wash bucket and your pad or wash mitt remains dirt free.

To dry the car you always want to use a Microfiber waffle weave towel. They are made of synthetic fibers with thousands of small pockets to trap water and any residule dirt that will not scratch. These towels can hold up to 8 times its own weight and are washable and reusable.

Thats just my .02 Hope this helps

Totoland
12-14-2006, 03:54 PM
SSIMON: you can't go wrong with Adams car wash. I too recommend a grit guard in the bucket so debris "falls" down from the wash mitt and is not re-introduced to the car's paint.

For drying a black vehicle, I'd also look at a leaf blower or clean, compressed air to blow off most of the water and a microfiber to get the remaining.

Here's an example of a customer's twin turbo 996 and only 600 miles + 1 wash done by the owner:
http://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/500/medium/Black996_OwnerWashed.jpg

He washed the car with ordinary dishwashing soap and dried it with an old terry cloth towel that was "laying around"

Hours later, after polishing and removing swirls, I gave him the 996 back
http://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/500/medium/Black996_Hoodshot_partialsun.jpg

http://www.autogeekonline.net/gallery/data/500/medium/Black996_overall_BlackSwirlFree.jpg

He's since been edjumakated" on proper washing techniques and the car still looks good after 3 months.

Totoland

BrAdam's
12-14-2006, 05:09 PM
SSIMON: you can't go wrong with Adams car wash. I too recommend a grit guard in the bucket so debris "falls" down from the wash mitt and is not re-introduced to the car's paint.

For drying a black vehicle, I'd also look at a leaf blower or clean, compressed air to blow off most of the water and a microfiber to get the remaining.

Totoland

+1 on the leaf blower or compressed air!! A real time saver and you also dont get any water blowing out of the cracks once you start driving down the road.

Double-S
12-14-2006, 05:18 PM
Wow! I feel like a real newbie here. You all know your stuff and seem to agree on the main points! Your advice will certainly help. I will have to find a retailer that sells Adam's kits or an equivalent brand up here in Toronto. You've all been a great help, thanks!:thumbup:

Totoland
12-14-2006, 05:26 PM
Wow! I feel like a real newbie here. You all know your stuff and seem to agree on the main points! Your advice will certainly help. I will have to find a retailer that sells Adam's kits or an equivalent brand up here in Toronto. You've all been a great help, thanks!:thumbup:

SSIMON: The key to washing is the soap lubricity. If you can't get Adams stuff where you live, I'd also recommend Meguiar's Gold Glass or NXT Wash. The Meguiar's stuff is available at most auto stores and major chains (Wal-Mart, etc).

Totoland

Johnz3mc
12-14-2006, 07:01 PM
your black paint is like my red paint, we have to be careful.

Rinse most of the heavy stuff off with a hose and jet stream.
Stay away from a foamgun unless you know the proper technique.
Instead, use a 2 bucket method of washing. Put a gritguard in at least the rinse bucket.

Use a quality soap/shampoo like totoland suggests. He offered some good suggestions.

Use a sheepskin mitt, even use 2 mitts. One for the higher areas, one for the lower (dirtier) areas. Real sheepskin is much less prone to swirls than the cheaper chenille mitts. (Boarshair brushes are quite pricey so I won't mention that technique here).

The electric airblower is a good choice for drying only if there is a very good coating of wax or sealant on the car, otherwise it's really tedious. With good wax/sealant, it's miraculous.

If you must use a towel to dry, take the nozzle off the hose and sheet as much water off the surface as possible, then use only a thick, quality microfiber and don't rub, pat the remaining water.

If you're unsure of the 2 bucket method, or sheeting water off the paint, or quality microfiber towels, don't be shy.
-John C.

Double-S
12-15-2006, 06:19 AM
your black paint is like my red paint, we have to be careful.

Rinse most of the heavy stuff off with a hose and jet stream.
Stay away from a foamgun unless you know the proper technique.
Instead, use a 2 bucket method of washing. Put a gritguard in at least the rinse bucket.

Use a quality soap/shampoo like totoland suggests. He offered some good suggestions.

Use a sheepskin mitt, even use 2 mitts. One for the higher areas, one for the lower (dirtier) areas. Real sheepskin is much less prone to swirls than the cheaper chenille mitts. (Boarshair brushes are quite pricey so I won't mention that technique here).

The electric airblower is a good choice for drying only if there is a very good coating of wax or sealant on the car, otherwise it's really tedious. With good wax/sealant, it's miraculous.

If you must use a towel to dry, take the nozzle off the hose and sheet as much water off the surface as possible, then use only a thick, quality microfiber and don't rub, pat the remaining water.

If you're unsure of the 2 bucket method, or sheeting water off the paint, or quality microfiber towels, don't be shy.
-John C.


John,
Great advice! I'm unsure of the two bucket method, sheeting water off and the quality of microfiber towels. Also, if you're not supposed to rub when drying, what motion should I use when washing? As you can see I'm not shy, my baby is too important to me.
Regards.

Tampa335i
12-15-2006, 02:09 PM
You can order a complete kit with was soap, clay bar, polish, wax, towels and applicators along with a bucket and grit guard directly from Adams at www.adamspolishes.com.

I have their professional kit and I order refills by the gallon.

The two bucket method is when you put clean soapy water in one bucket and just clear water in the other. Rinse the dirty wash mitt in the clear and then go back to the soap. This keeps the grit most away from your car.

The "sheeting water" trick is to remove the nozzle from the hose and just let the stream of water rinse the car. When the nozzle aerates the water it causes all the water to bead up on the surface leaving more water on the car to remove. When you just let the water flow from the hoze it will actually "slide" off the surface of the car.

The two mitt idea is best. Use one for the top and the top 2/3 of the sides. Use another for the lower 1/3 of the sides. Also use a different mitt or a wheel brush for the wheels.

Adams has a great DVD that will come with your order of a kit that will show you how to do all of this.

Good Luck!!

Double-S
12-16-2006, 05:37 AM
Tampa335i
Great explanation. Much appreciated! Thought I'd post some pics of my baby!:thumbup:

Johnz3mc
12-16-2006, 03:49 PM
John,
Great advice! I'm unsure of the two bucket method, sheeting water off and the quality of microfiber towels. Also, if you're not supposed to rub when drying, what motion should I use when washing? As you can see I'm not shy, my baby is too important to me.
Regards.
Sorry for the lateness, my power was out for 24 hrs.
Two bucket method:
Two buckets, one with clear soapy water. The other with clear 'rinse' water.
Dip the mitt into the soapy bucket and wash gently. When done, dip the mitt into the rinse bucket and agitate the mitt. Dirt will fall out into the water, through the gritguard and accumulate at the bottom of the rinse bucket.
Go back to the soapy bucket and reload the now clean mitt with clean shampoo and repeat the washing process. Repeat the rinse, reload, wash, rinse, etc.

Sheeting H2O:
Take all nozzles off the end of the hose. Use most any volume of water coming out of the hose. Start on the top of the car and work down. Move the stream slowly over the surface and if you're good, you'll see the water grab droplets and add them to the rinse stream, leaving less water on the surface. You use your water stream like a water magnet to pick up old water and move it off the surface. Be gentle with your motions, don't be fast.

Don't rub - pat:
You won't have much water left after it's been sheeted off. Blot the existing parts, even lay the towel over the water and pat it. It'll wick up into the towel.

Microfiber towels:
Some are very plush and thick. Some are quite thin. Some have nylon thread around the outside.
You want thick ones and be wary of the nylon threads on the edges if present.
Pakshak, exceldetail, and others sell good ones online.
Thin ones, cheap ones, available for a few bucks at Walmart of big box stores are fine for door jambs, wheels, and glass but not painted surfaces
Waffle weave are a microfiber variant and hold lots of water and are good for 'blotting'.
-John C.

Tampa335i
12-16-2006, 05:44 PM
Tampa335i
Great explanation. Much appreciated! Thought I'd post some pics of my baby!:thumbup:


Beautiful car!! Get some Adams polish and some butter wax on that and it will look great.

Totoland
12-16-2006, 06:10 PM
SSIMON: Great Car! Nice photos you have. I haven't detailed any of the roadsters yet (boy, I'm glad this shop has a lift!...makes detailing the lower panels easy), but we will probably get some later this winter for spring sales. Right now X5's seem to be the most popular here in the midwest.

Take good care of your car...there's lots of good suggestions for maintaining the finish and keeping it pristine.

Totoland