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View Full Version : remove wax w 50/50 water/alcohol?


frank325
12-16-2006, 07:21 PM
Is using a solution of 50/50 water and rubbing alcohol (70%) good for removing old wax instead of buying a paint cleanser or some other product?

MikeCTM2
12-16-2006, 08:25 PM
ugh, slow down there big fella! i think the only approved way is to wash with Dawn.

frank325
12-16-2006, 09:38 PM
I have no idea, there have been arguments for and against Dawn. But I swear I've read at least on one occasion that using a solution of water and alcohol is another way of removing wax. I mean, isn't that the reason you are supposed to swap areas that are getting paint touch ups with alcohol?

inTgr8r
12-17-2006, 06:29 AM
I know many detailers that use 50/50.
Dawn does not completely remove sealant type products.

TOGWT
12-18-2006, 12:39 AM
Be careful what you use on a paint surface; a polyurethane paint (high solid, low solvent clear coats) can absorb moisture; as water molecules are smaller than a cross-linked clear coats molecule. So be aware of the contents in car wash liquids or concentrates, sealant and waxes (i.e. low pH acids, high pH alkaline, Dimethal (DMS) silicones or solvents that contain butyl, heptanes, and xylene or hydrocarbon aliphatic solvents.
(See also MSDS, Potential of Hydrogen (pH)

Generally avoid the use of household cleaning products for automotive detailing as they are formulated for an entirely different type of cleaning. Quote ***8211; ***8220;Your car surface and the dirt that gets on it are a lot different from the food soils and dishes that dishwashing liquids clean effectively. We don't recommend them for cleaning your car***8221;. Proctor and Gamble (Mfg. of Dawn dishwasing liquid)

Alternative products- DuPont Prepsol II, Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA) Klasse All-In-One, Z-PC Fusion Dual Action Paint Cleaner

325ic a beer
12-18-2006, 12:46 AM
Be careful what you use on a paint surface; a polyurethane paint (high solid, low solvent clear coats) can absorb moisture; as water molecules are smaller than a cross-linked clear coats molecule. So be aware of the contents in car wash liquids or concentrates, sealant and waxes (i.e. low pH acids, high pH alkaline, Dimethal (DMS) silicones or solvents that contain butyl, heptanes, and xylene or hydrocarbon aliphatic solvents.
(See also MSDS, Potential of Hydrogen (pH)

Generally avoid the use of household cleaning products for automotive detailing as they are formulated for an entirely different type of cleaning. Quote "Your car surface and the dirt that gets on it are a lot different from the food soils and dishes that dishwashing liquids clean effectively. We don't recommend them for cleaning your car". Proctor and Gamble (Mfg. of Dawn dishwasing liquid)

Alternative products- DuPont Prepsol II, Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA) Klasse All-In-One, Z-PC Fusion Dual Action Paint Cleaner


Man,
I think he might know something about this subject.....:wow: :wow: :wow:

Locksmythe
12-18-2006, 12:40 PM
Or knows where to find the information to quote it quickly.

TOGWT
12-18-2006, 01:44 PM
Or knows where to find the information to quote it quickly.

Absolutly correct- Automotive Detailing; Inside & Out, A Knowledge Base for the Perfectionist by Jon Miller aka TOGWT

TOGWT Copyright 2002-2006. Jon Miller, all rights reserved

No trees were harmed in the creation of this book, but billions of electrons, photons, and electromagnetic waves were terribly inconvenienced!

Johnz3mc
12-18-2006, 03:56 PM
Jon,
I've learned a lot from your helpful replies to people with problems and am now in dire need of that book you mentioned, the one by Jon Miller.
That guy probably knows about as much as you do so I'm going to need a copy.
I'll pm you and see about the details of pricing, shipping, etc.
OK, I'm laughing, but I still want your book,
-John C.

picus
12-18-2006, 04:54 PM
Is using a solution of 50/50 water and rubbing alcohol (70%) good for removing old wax instead of buying a paint cleanser or some other product?

Alcohol/water (isopropyl alcohol), 50/50 is commonly used by detailers to remove wax, sealants, and polish residue. It is perfectly safe for non-solvent based paint (so all factory paint).


Alternative products- DuPont Prepsol II, Isopropyl Alcohol (IPA) Klasse All-In-One, Z-PC Fusion Dual Action Paint Cleaner

:thumbup:

joyriide1113
12-26-2006, 12:29 PM
I have used alcohal mixes before and I find it "ok" for removing old wax and making the paint "sealant" ready.

I was polishing the paint with the new ZPC polish. My car was in awesome shape (not many swirls or marr on certain sections of the car). So I used 1:1 alcohal on the sections that didn't get polished. Zaino bonded fine to it, without any issues.

Boxboss
12-27-2006, 06:31 PM
Be careful what you use on a paint surface; a polyurethane paint (high solid, low solvent clear coats) can absorb moisture; as water molecules are smaller than a cross-linked clear coats molecule. So be aware of the contents in car wash liquids or concentrates...So...what do you wash your car with? What about rain? Something doesn't wash with this. :dunno:

Lanc3r
12-27-2006, 06:58 PM
What about rain? . :dunno:

Thats what wax is for.

Boxboss
12-27-2006, 07:10 PM
Thats what wax is for.Completely agree. The warning was (seemed to be) about using water/water containing products on your paint. :rofl:

TOGWT
12-28-2006, 07:11 AM
Completely agree. The warning was (seemed to be) about using water/water containing products on your paint. :rofl:

Water will not harm a 'water-based paint'!

[So] But be aware of the contents in car wash liquids or concentrates, sealant and waxes (i.e. low pH acids, high pH alkaline, Dimethal (DMS) silicones or solvents that contain butyl, heptanes, and xylene or hydrocarbon aliphatic solvents.
(See also MSDS, Potential of Hydrogen (pH)

Totoland
12-28-2006, 02:28 PM
I don't see the benefit of a water/alcohol mix. Use a car shampoo that has lubricity and the formula is designed for auto finish. Meguiar's Gold Class, NXT, Adams Car Wash...all good stuff.

If the objective is to remove a previous wax or sealant, when you apply a polish such as Meguiar's #83, Menzerma, etc. that is going to remove any prior sealant or wax.

I detail approx. 100 BMW's per year for resale and have never heard of using a water/alcohol mix. I would also think the alcohol would evaporate before it did much removal.

Toto

picus
12-28-2006, 02:44 PM
The advantage is when you want to strip a sealant or wax and *will not* be polishing. The other thing I use it for (much more often) is to remove polish residue after polishing but before sealing.

Totoland
12-28-2006, 04:03 PM
The advantage is when you want to strip a sealant or wax and *will not* be polishing. The other thing I use it for (much more often) is to remove polish residue after polishing but before sealing.

Thanks for the info picus. Your methods are a little different from mine when it involves removing polish residue before sealing. I work in a shop environment and after compounding and glazing, power wash the car to remove residue from seams, cracks, etc. That gives me a clean surface for #26 which is my final step.

I might try that method sometime when it gets too cold for an outside power wash.

Totoland

picus
12-28-2006, 06:33 PM
Thanks for the info picus. Your methods are a little different from mine when it involves removing polish residue before sealing. I work in a shop environment and after compounding and glazing, power wash the car to remove residue from seams, cracks, etc. That gives me a clean surface for #26 which is my final step.

I might try that method sometime when it gets too cold for an outside power wash.

Totoland

Cool. I used to work at a dealership years ago and we did the same thing, so I understand. :thumbup: