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2006330i
01-11-2007, 10:55 AM
To celebrate the one year anniversary of my car, I decided to grind the airdam against the curb. :bawling: Now I've got a nice, two inch black mark on my nice white car. The mark is a good 1/2 inch across. Is there any touch up I can do myself (doesn't have to be perfect, the scratch is on the lower corner) or do I just bite the bullet and take it to the body shop?

Johnz3mc
01-11-2007, 01:02 PM
To celebrate the one year anniversary of my car, I decided to grind the airdam against the curb. :bawling: Now I've got a nice, two inch black mark on my nice white car. The mark is a good 1/2 inch across. Is there any touch up I can do myself (doesn't have to be perfect, the scratch is on the lower corner) or do I just bite the bullet and take it to the body shop?
You can fix it yourself or at least minimize the harsh contrast. I'm assuming you're not afraid to try simple stuff like a little delicate sanding etc.
Step 1 would be to assemble the stuff:
wet/dry sandpaper - 200 grit, and 400 grit and 2000 grit.
Touchup paint - paintscratch.com to get the correct colour match. Maybe get some touchup clear too.

The process:
sand the area with 200 grit then 400 grit. Don't be afraid to use really little pieces of sandpaper. Cut them to size and glue them to the end of a pencil eraser if you need it that small. Let common sense determine the best size for you.

Apply very light coats of paint. Let dry then apply more coats. Repeat until the patch of paint is a little thicker and higher than the surrounding area.

Let it dry for a couple of days then do the levelling step. Soak the 2000 grit wet sandpaper for 30 min. Wrap it around a little block of wood. Continually spritz with h20 while you gently sand down the lump. Don't stop spritzing as you level.
Stop when your eyes and fingers tell you it's flat.

Hand polish with ScratchX to remove the 2000 grit sanding marks if you see them.
Wait a couple of days or a month (or not) and wax/seal the area well.

We know it's not wise to wax over a newly painted area but we're talking a front bumper here, a tiny area, and it's going to get bashed again sooner or later anyway. The next bump is going to happen much sooner than paint failure from waxing too soon. You can always wait the recommended month before wax if you wish.

By going to paintscratch.com or a similar place, you'll get the proper paint for really good paint match (not counting fading of course) and have plenty left over for the next time.

All this sounds complicated but it's not. Little steps, with lots of waiting time.
Let us know what you decide.
-John C.

dboy11
01-11-2007, 01:10 PM
John has what is one way to fix this and as you say it dosen't have to look perfect then that's your course

Another would be to call your local dealership and ask what mobilie guy that they are using for scratch repair, most all have a guy that dose this for them, the higher end used lots will for sure for trade-ins.

As for the cost don't know but it will look better in the long run

2006330i
01-11-2007, 05:06 PM
John, thanks for the tips, I think that's going to be my plan.

John has what is one way to fix this and as you say it dosen't have to look perfect then that's your course

Another would be to call your local dealership and ask what mobilie guy that they are using for scratch repair, most all have a guy that dose this for them, the higher end used lots will for sure for trade-ins.

As for the cost don't know but it will look better in the long run

Thanks. In the long run, I'm going to take it to a body shop I know which does good work and is pretty inexpensive. Problem is that they are not that close and I have to leave my car, have someone drive me or get a rental = pain in the butt. I need a stop gap solution until I have the time to do that and John's seems like it will do the trick.

dboy11
01-11-2007, 07:01 PM
John, thanks for the tips, I think that's going to be my plan.



Thanks. In the long run, I'm going to take it to a body shop I know which does good work and is pretty inexpensive. Problem is that they are not that close and I have to leave my car, have someone drive me or get a rental = pain in the butt. I need a stop gap solution until I have the time to do that and John's seems like it will do the trick.

Johns solution is a great one I've done it plenty of times and because its on the bottom I'll bet you will forget that its even there

Johnz3mc
01-12-2007, 02:21 AM
Boys, boys, boys,
You're too kind.
John knows his technique works because John is a bonehead and drove onto a parking stop and put small scratches on the bottom of his airdam too.

That technique worked very well and recently when I had the car up on a lift, the inlaws (really outlaws) at the garage/body shop, commented on how well the bottom of the airdam looked considering it's so low to the ground and how old the coupe is. They didn't even see the old damage. I had to break down, and between the sobbing I confessed I did a small repair and they were impressed. Perhaps they were just being kind, being family and all. They poured me a cup of tea and gave me biscuits. Canadians are so genteel.

I have an invisible spot on the side of the door/window and when I line it up with those pesky parking stops, I'm usually about 8 inches away. It usually works quite well unless an attractive member of the opposite persuasion walks nearby and distracts me. I fall for that distractive ploy every time, you think I'd learn.

Anyway, it'll hold well until a pro does a proper job.
Maybe use the professional repair for a bit of fun. While your car is getting the work done, just go nuts and rent some really high end car like a jag, or a lambo, or an M5 or ......
-John C.