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iiotoko
01-03-2003, 12:12 PM
I have become interested, because of the proliferation of drivers listening to extremely loud music while driving, chatting on cell phones etc, to install new, louder horns in my e46 for safety and attention.

Looking at whats available, I found two Hella models, one 'Supertone Horn' rated at 113db and another higher pitched horn rated at 118db.

Is there much of a difference between the two (113v118db); is it louder that the stock model that came with my car and is it difficult to install for someone who has little experience in such things?

Any insight would be appreciated.

Thanks.

iitotko

beauport
01-03-2003, 12:25 PM
5db is a fair amount louder than 113db unit. For some comparison 120db is basically used as the threshold of pain to human ears and is what you approximate by standing 100 feet behind a modern jet aircraft. Either the 113 or 118db horns will be substantially louder than oem horns. The Hella horns I've seen listed in Griot's Garage appear to be pretty easily installed.

Originally posted by iiotoko
I have become interested, because of the proliferation of drivers listening to extremely loud music while driving, chatting on cell phones etc, to install new, louder horns in my e46 for safety and attention.

Looking at whats available, I found two Hella models, one 'Supertone Horn' rated at 113db and another higher pitched horn rated at 118db.

Is there much of a difference between the two (113v118db); is it louder that the stock model that came with my car and is it difficult to install for someone who has little experience in such things?

Any insight would be appreciated.

Thanks.

iitotko

Kaz
01-03-2003, 12:35 PM
Hmm, should I really be answering posts from someone on my ignore list? :dunno:

Contrary to what some people have said, the Hella Supertones are NOT PnP, as they appear to have screw terminals, not the bipin plugs that the car has. You'll have to hack the car's stock connectos off or build harnesses like we do out here for the airhorns. They should be a LOT easier to install since you could probably just bolt em to the stock horn brackets in the bumper instead of the half dozen pieces you gotta cram in for the airhorns.

I've yet to hear a set of Supertones, but fom the specs they should sound a bit lower tonally since they're 300/500Hz and the stocks are something like 420/540Hz.

They're rated the same output (118db) as the airhorns, which is damn loud.

dredmo
01-03-2003, 02:12 PM
I can tell ya, 5 db is considerable, and noticable depending on frequency, and if you just want to be annoying and get attention, higher frequency is better.

Hey Ack, is he talking about you? (loud stereo, watching dvds while driving etc... )??:D :angel:

Pinecone
01-03-2003, 04:43 PM
dB is a log scale, not linear. Every 3 dB increase is double the actual sound power. It also means that 10 dB is 10 times the sound power output (2x2x2x1.2).

So going from 113 dB to 118 dB is about 3 times the sound power output.

beauport
01-04-2003, 10:10 AM
Originally posted by Pinecone
dB is a log scale, not linear. Every 3 dB increase is double the actual sound power. It also means that 10 dB is 10 times the sound power output (2x2x2x1.2).

So going from 113 dB to 118 dB is about 3 times the sound power output.

Not to turn this thread into a course in acoustics, but I'm not sure of the meaning "sound power output". An increase in volume (sound level) of 3 db requires doubling the power (electricity) to the speaker, or horn in this case. The "perceived" volume increase by the human ear is 3 db which is a relatively small increase. 1db is the theoretical sound level change that a human can hear. Doubling the volume, what we perceive as being twice as loud, 5db going to 10 db, requires 10 times the power (electricity) to do so. Your statement above that going from 113db to 118db being 3 times the sound power output really means it requires almost 3 times the electricity to produce that change but the perceived "volume", i.e. loudness change is not in the same relationship.

Pinecone
01-04-2003, 01:03 PM
Originally posted by beauport
Not to turn this thread into a course in acoustics, but I'm not sure of the meaning "sound power output". An increase in volume (sound level) of 3 db requires doubling the power (electricity) to the speaker, or horn in this case. The "perceived" volume increase by the human ear is 3 db which is a relatively small increase. 1db is the theoretical sound level change that a human can hear. Doubling the volume, what we perceive as being twice as loud, 5db going to 10 db, requires 10 times the power (electricity) to do so. Your statement above that going from 113db to 118db being 3 times the sound power output really means it requires almost 3 times the electricity to produce that change but the perceived "volume", i.e. loudness change is not in the same relationship.

Sound power is the actual energy of the air being moved. It may take twice as much current, or it may take a more efficient driver.
If I have a speaker that puts out 90 dB on 1 watt, 2 watts gives me 93dB, 10 watts gives me 100dB, 100 watts gives me 110dB, a 1000 watts to hit 120 dB.

It doesn't sound twice as loud, that is true. To see what a 3dB increase sounds like take two radios. Set the volume to them exactly the same. Turn on only one. Listen. Turn on the other, you now hear a 3dB higher sound power.

And as you said typically a 1dB difference can be heard. The idea is you have to get at least as much sound power INTO the other car than the music in the othercar. And preferably more to get his attention quickly.

So if he has the music up to 110dB inside his car, a 113dB horn is a little louder, a 118dB horn is a good bit louder.