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kjboyd
03-22-2007, 08:23 PM
UPDATE:

well, as I had feared, they had to replace the entire sunroof cassette to fix my rattle problem.

Good news is the rattle is gone.
Bad news is, they left finger print marks all over the headliner and seat backs, tore one of the C-pillar coverings, nothing fits quite right anymore and the headliner is off center by about 1/8" so that it covers the left track but the right track is visible from inside the car.

ugh.

Yes, they are taking care of the torn panel, but i just discovred the off center problem tonight. I take it in tomorrow to have the panel fixed and will be asking at that time for them to drop the headliner once again and get it fixed. Also, the screws in the holes for the casette across the front aren't even aligned.

This was the reason i didn't want to get it fixed in the first place, cause i knew it wouldn't go back right. i've only got 5,500 miles on it and i feel like it's as old as my 120,000 528i that i had.

any one else who's done this job have similar problems?

kjboyd
03-26-2007, 08:56 AM
well, it's gotten worse. they recentered the sunroof, now it makes more noise than it did before I took it in to have it replaced.

guess they'll just have to do it again.

how many times does it take to get it lemon-lawed in CA?

sfca-325i
03-26-2007, 09:50 AM
I doubt that a rattling sunroof would qualify as a safety related defect under California's lemon law.

kjboyd
03-26-2007, 11:06 AM
doesn't have to be a safety issue.

jcarlilesiu
03-26-2007, 12:17 PM
I had the whole cassette replaced in my -04 after something popped while trying to vent it. I noticed a couple of marks on the headliner, but everything else looked great. I was able to get the marks off. Sorry you are having such a hard time. Seems your dealers techs are a bit incompetent.

sfca-325i
03-27-2007, 09:16 AM
A special provision, often called the "Lemon Law," helps determine what is a reasonable number of repair attempts for problems that substantially impair the use, value, or safety of the vehicle. The "Lemon Law" applies to these problems if they arise during the first 18 months after the consumer received delivery of the vehicle or within the first 18,000 miles on the odometer, whichever occurs first. During the first 18 months or 18,000 miles, the "Lemon Law" presumes that a manufacturer has had a reasonable number of attempts to repair the vehicle if either (1) The same problem results in a condition that is likely to cause death or serious bodily injury if the vehicle is driven and the problem has been subject to repair two or more times by the manufacturer or its agents, and the buyer or lessee has at least once directly notified the manufacturer of the need for the repair of the problem as provided in the warranty or owner's manual or (2) The same problem has been subject to repair four or more times by the manufacturer or its agents and the buyer has at least once directly notified the manufacturer of the need for the repair of the problem as provided in the warranty or owner's manual or (3) The vehicle is out of service because of the repair of any number of problems by the manufacturer or its agents for a cumulative total of more than 30 days since delivery of the vehicle.

The "Lemon Law" presumption is a guide, not an absolute rule. A judge or arbitrator can assume that the manufacturer has had a reasonable number of chances to repair the vehicle if all of the conditions are met. The manufacturer, however, has the right to try to prove that it should have the chance to attempt additional repairs, and the consumer has the right to show that fewer repair attempts are reasonable under the circumstances.

Be sure to check your warranty and owner's manual for instructions. You may be required to directly notify the manufacturer of the problem(s). It is a good idea to send your written notice to the manufacturer at the address shown in the warranty or owner's manual by certified mail, return receipt requested so that you have proof that your letter was received. Keep a copy of all correspondence.

If the manufacturer maintains a state-certified arbitration program, the consumer must submit the warranty dispute to the arbitration program before the consumer can take advantage of the presumption in court. Arbitration is an alternative to court proceedings. The consumer may assert the presumption during arbitration. Information about any arbitration should be described in the warranty or owner's manual.

Not every manufacturer maintains a state certified program. You should check with the Department of Consumer Affairs' Arbitration Certification Program at (800) 952-5210 or on the Internet at www.dca.ca.gov/acp. You can also ask for the department's free pamphlet that explains more about arbitration, "Lemon Aid for Consumers."

kjboyd
03-27-2007, 10:26 AM
like i said:
or (2) The same problem has been subject to repair four or more times by the manufacturer or its agents and the buyer has at least once directly notified the manufacturer of the need for the repair of the problem as provided in the warranty or owner's manual or

kjboyd
03-28-2007, 10:43 PM
I have an appt. on Saturday for it to be looked at again... what i have to remind myself is that this is a manufacturing problem that can't be controlled by the dealer.
they are trying to make it right.

kjboyd
04-19-2007, 07:26 PM
well, two weeks later.. i finally have my car, er, SAV back. They adjusted, taped, stuck, screwed, and whatever else they could do. And gave it back to me rattle free last night.

too bad it started all over again this morning. This thing is doomed!
has anyone else had this much trouble after they replaced their sunroof?