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View Full Version : Crash test comparison


hayden
07-06-2009, 07:34 PM
Take a look at the difference between a Chinese Brilliance BS6 vs. a 7 series:

-9RbZyrJQ4g

AYdp_MzHo_g

:jawdrop:

hayden
07-07-2009, 04:05 PM
For those who don't have time to watch... here is a screen shot of the final result:

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=192401&stc=1&d=1247007851

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/attachment.php?attachmentid=192402&stc=1&d=1247007851

China's Brilliance BS6 is a recent entry into the European market, positioned as a premium-style import sedan at a budget price. Well, after seeing the videos of the car undergoing crash testing using Euro NCAP guidelines at the ADAC (Germany's AAA, essentially) test center, one thing's certain: buyers get what they pay for. The BS6, as currently constructed, appears to a complete piece of crap. The horrifying 40 mph offset frontal crash test video shows damage that can be described as catastrophic at best. The A-pillar collapses and folds up like a cheap suitcase, forcing the driver's door to pop largely out of its frame, while the lower portion of the car buckles like it's made of recycled pop cans. We wouldn't want to be the driver's legs...or any other part of him for that matter. To open the mangled door afterwards, the ADAC techs needed to use a huge crowbar to get it to budge. ADAC notes that the pedals intruded a foot and a half (32 cm) into the driver's space, while the IP moved in almost 8 inches (20 cm). Needless to say, the BS6 failed the test, garnering just 1 star.

The side-impact video's no picnic, either, as the driver's upper body takes the impact so hard, the injuries sustained would likely prove fatal. For all the crowing about Chinese cars and how they're an inevitability, if this is the kind of safety that they'll bring with them, have fun finding buyers. Back in April, Brilliance's head honcho said that this very model, the BS6, would be imported to the US either later this year or in 2008. You know what? Keep it.

After seeing the car's stellar crash performance in Deutschland, we wouldn't be caught dead in one. The good news for Europeans is that this disastrous test result might be enough to halt sales. That's what happened after the Jiangling Motors' Landwind SUV failed the same test in even more spectacular fashion in late 2005 (listen to the ADAC guys crack up after they see the Landwind result in that second link).

Until Chinese automakers get very serious about making and exporting cars that meet commonly-accepted occupant protection standards, the idea of them having any impact whatsoever in the safety-conscious United States market is laughable.

chrischeung
07-07-2009, 05:35 PM
Hyundai Genesis:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhX2Q8X9ha4

hayden
07-07-2009, 09:17 PM
Hyundai Genesis

Not sure what your response means...

chrischeung
07-08-2009, 12:26 AM
Not sure what your response means...

Folks may be interested in seeing how the Hyundai performs, since it is sized similar to the 7er, and Korea is a next door neighbor to China.

hayden
07-08-2009, 08:10 AM
I don't think anyone doubts quality products are coming from the likes of Japan and South Korea... China is the problem.

chrischeung
07-08-2009, 08:35 AM
I don't think anyone doubts quality products are coming from the likes of Japan and South Korea... China is the problem.

I don't see a problem. Chinese cars are designed (or not) for the Chinese 3rd world market. Japanese and Korean are not. But if you think back to Japanese and Korean humble export beginnings, you will probably draw many similarities with what the Chinese are doing. You don't build a suitable car before establishing a sales and distribution channel - you do it after plying your existing catalog. Otherwise you could be out of pocket by $1 billion or so.

Having said that, I wouldn't buy a Chinese designed car (yet). But I'd buy a Chinese made BMW - just as I would a US made BMW. I do prefer German made BMWs :).

hayden
07-08-2009, 10:16 AM
Chinese cars are designed (or not) for the Chinese 3rd world market. Japanese and Korean are not.

Except the head of Brilliance said they planned to import that car to the US. That obviously has not happened.

Also, how can other car makers compete in the marketplace (even the Chinese market) when Brilliance seems to have no safety related costs? Your argument seems to imply that 3rd world customers can do with sub-standard safety. The least expensive cars in the US would still perform dramatically better than this Chinese model in crash tests.

You don't build a suitable car before establishing a sales and distribution channel - you do it after plying your existing catalog. Otherwise you could be out of pocket by $1 billion or so.

You should not be selling a vehicle to the public without it being "suitable". It would not be a $1 billion dollar investment, either. Are you telling me Tesla has absorbed $1 billion is costs related to safety engineering and testing of its Tesla Roadster? As of January 2009 Tesla's total costs since inception were less than $200 million (all costs, not just safety).

dbs600
04-09-2011, 05:50 PM
Was to post this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WWvNotPojms

But found that this great thread had already been started.

Thank you gentlemen, and thank you BMW!