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View Full Version : Will Super Unleaded reach $3/gallon?


RCK
08-20-2003, 05:35 PM
Just wanted to get a general idea of how much everyone is paying for superunleaded? Here in Ventura County, CA the avg gallon of super unleaded is $2.25. :yikes: Its gonna cost me almost $40+ to fill up my tank!! :mad: :bawling:

The Roadstergal
08-20-2003, 05:40 PM
Now we're getting a feel for why Europeans like smaller engines.

Andy
08-20-2003, 05:42 PM
I just filled up with Sunoko Ultra 94 @ $1.99 a gallon... it cost me $30 to fill up... and I thought THAT was bad!!

mquetel
08-20-2003, 05:50 PM
Just wanted to get a general idea of how much everyone is paying for superunleaded? Here in Ventura County, CA the avg gallon of super unleaded is $2.25. :yikes: Its gonna cost me almost $40+ to fill up my tank!! :mad: :bawling:

I hope so. :eeps:

How else are individuals, corporations and gov't agencies going to be convinced to conserve, build more fuel efficient systems, develop and support alternative energy systems, build and utilize mass transit, support carpool/walk/ride to work, promote telecommuting/flexible work schedules and convince people to live closer to work?

Flame retardant suit is *ON*

RCK
08-20-2003, 05:50 PM
What really pisses me off is that last night it was $2.07. As I was going to work this morning, I can see that guy at the gas station raising it up!
People were driving by him and honking. The expression on his face was priceless :eeps:

Alex Baumann
08-20-2003, 06:09 PM
Now we're getting a feel for why Europeans like smaller engines.


:wave:

Patrick330i
08-20-2003, 09:03 PM
What really pisses me off is that last night it was $2.07. As I was going to work this morning, I can see that guy at the gas station raising it up!
People were driving by him and honking. The expression on his face was priceless :eeps:

KTLA reported last night that the price would go up a dime in the next day or two. Guess they weren't kidding.

Just wanted to get a general idea of how much everyone is paying for superunleaded? Here in Ventura County, CA the avg gallon of super unleaded is $2.25. Its gonna cost me almost $40+ to fill up my tank!!

It's about the same here, too. I did find a place for $2.07 today, so I ended up at about $30 for the fill as well. If the price got high enough to get A LOT of cars off the road, it would be worth paying more. If it doesn't even knock a dent in local traffic, then no good comes out of it at all. :mad:

Kaz
08-20-2003, 09:11 PM
$2.25ish looking around on my way home today. Since it's being said that the pipeline failure will take a week to fix, we'll probably see prices climb for another couple of weeks, though not as drastically as the last 4 or 5 days.

101 octane at $4.50ish doesn't look so outrageous anymore.

Mr. The Edge
08-20-2003, 09:15 PM
I hope it never goes up to $2.00

:D

Stuka
08-20-2003, 09:17 PM
I sincerely hope the gas goes up and stays AT LEAST $3. :thumbup:

Since the SUV's don't have to pay the $1000 gas guzzler while the 24/19mpg M3's do, I am all for them paying $60 a fill up. :flipoff:

Trucks my arse, big, under engineered, can't stop worth a damn couumter cars are more like it. And for that, the least they could do is jack up the gas price. :dunno:

Andy
02 M3 CB/Cloth SMG

Nick325xiT 5spd
08-20-2003, 09:26 PM
I paid $1.91 for Sunoco 94 on Sunday. Hopefully prices will go up.

car_for_mom
08-21-2003, 08:31 AM
And yea, verily, the populace of Phoenix, Arizona, doth lift their voices up in lament...I saw a picture on the Net (wish I could find it) of a gas station in Phoenix with prices like $3.99 :yikes:

Back in The Land Of Bovine Living (I tell you, it's got to be the platinum salts in California gasoline...Karl Bimmer's last fill-up was $31.99 - $2.219/gallon for premium unleaded. The prices tend to be higher in places like The People's Republic Of Irvine.

And, his gas mileage has been going down lately, due to the mild, balmy, Southern California summer :rolleyes: - it was up to 26.5 at one point, but now is down to 25.9 :( (the M drivers are not loving life at this point when they pull up to the pumps...but the drive to the pumps is worth it :bigpimp: )

I recall that the 330 actually gets better mileage than the 325? I've actually considered getting a Mini as a daily driver; I went down to the dealer and sat in one, but the interior is, er, interesting :rolleyes:

TD
08-21-2003, 08:37 AM
I hope so. :eeps:

How else are individuals, corporations and gov't agencies going to be convinced to conserve, build more fuel efficient systems, develop and support alternative energy systems, build and utilize mass transit, support carpool/walk/ride to work, promote telecommuting/flexible work schedules and convince people to live closer to work?

Flame retardant suit is *ON*
:thumbup:

BTW, 93 octane unleaded is only ~$1.80 around here. We're usually not low. I wonder what's up.

Mr. The Edge
08-21-2003, 09:30 AM
I filled up with 93 a couple of days ago for $1.5499

:thumbup:

e.biemold
08-21-2003, 09:34 AM
1 gallon of fuel costs around $ 4,70 in the Netherlands at the moment ;)

e.biemold
08-21-2003, 09:35 AM
....double post....

Mr. The Edge
08-21-2003, 09:38 AM
I'm waiting for $5.00/gallon for regular unlead.

why anyone would wish that on the poor folks of this country is beyond me.

Kaz
08-21-2003, 09:41 AM
:thumbup:

BTW, 93 octane unleaded is only ~$1.80 around here. We're usually not low. I wonder what's up.

This appears to be a regional (AZ/CA) issue for the most part.

Saw $2.31 on my way in this AM.

TD
08-21-2003, 09:42 AM
why anyone would wish that on the poor folks of this country is beyond me.
The reason is the long-term benefits of significantly higher fuel costs. There might be *some* intial pain, but the long-term benefits would be huge.

Mr. The Edge
08-21-2003, 09:45 AM
The reason is the long-term benefits of significantly higher fuel costs. There might be *some* intial pain, but the long-term benefits would be huge.

What long term benefits would those living at/near the poverty line see as a result of $5/gal gas?

mquetel
08-21-2003, 09:57 AM
What long term benefits would those living at/near the poverty line see as a result of $5/gal gas?

They might see (to name a few):

A better and more pervasive public transit system that actually goes places that people want to go and when they want to go.

Perhaps alternative fuel systems that make having a gasoline engine car a rich boy toy and a electric or hydrogen or whatever car the economical and earth friendly one to have.

A city or community which has reduced smog levels because of reduced emissions.

pdz
08-21-2003, 10:04 AM
What long term benefits would those living at/near the poverty line see as a result of $5/gal gas?

first: it's kind of funny to read about BMW owners discussing the plight of "poor people". WHAT IS THIS? socialiast europe? yes, i empathize for their plight, but in terms of long terms economics of the country, i'd rather fuel costs get factored in now, not later.

second: the prevalence of SUVs on the roads wear down the roads faster and raise insurance premiums all around for the rest of us. do i really care, therefore, what happens to gas prices? i'm already paying for the mass idiocy in america. so if the gas prices go up, i'd be more than happy to see my insurance premiums finally go down and the taxes i pay the US, the state, the county and the city for roads go down, also.

The Roadstergal
08-21-2003, 10:10 AM
What long term benefits would those living at/near the poverty line see as a result of $5/gal gas?

When I lived at/near the poverty line ($17K a year), I couldn't afford a car. The state of public transit was what mattered (thanks, Tim :madrazz: ).

The Roadstergal
08-21-2003, 10:13 AM
Since the SUV's don't have to pay the $1000 gas guzzler while the 24/19mpg M3's do, I am all for them paying $60 a fill up. :flipoff:

Trucks my arse, big, under engineered, can't stop worth a damn couumter cars are more like it. And for that, the least they could do is jack up the gas price. :dunno:


What he said. Does everyone really think that making the commuter cars of choice troop transports and towing vehicles instead of regular cars would have no impact on energy costs?

ff
08-21-2003, 10:17 AM
The reason is the long-term benefits of significantly higher fuel costs. There might be *some* intial pain, but the long-term benefits would be huge.

The only problem, is that gas stations are taking the extra profit. If there's going to be high gas prices, then I'd much rather see uncle sam take the profits in the form of tax $$$. That way, like you've mentioned before, the money can go towards fixing roadways and improving pubic transit.

The Roadstergal
08-21-2003, 10:31 AM
The only problem, is that gas stations are taking the extra profit. If there's going to be high gas prices, then I'd much rather see uncle sam take the profits in the form of tax $$$. That way, like you've mentioned before, the money can go towards fixing roadways and improving pubic transit.

The problem is, when gas stations hike prices, people grumble. When taxes are levied on gas, people scream murder and demand recalls. Prices here have gone up ~$0.80 since I bought my car, and $0.05 of that is a new tax - but it's the nickel that I hear people gripe about. :tsk:

pdz
08-21-2003, 10:40 AM
The only problem, is that gas stations are taking the extra profit. If there's going to be high gas prices, then I'd much rather see uncle sam take the profits in the form of tax $$$. That way, like you've mentioned before, the money can go towards fixing roadways and improving pubic transit.

i've got no issue holding equity in petroleum companies.

i do not think that local yokels make all that much money compared to the refinery types and the big companies. margins cannot be that great on a consistent long term basis.

ff
08-21-2003, 10:46 AM
i've got no issue holding equity in petroleum companies.

i do not think that local yokels make all that much money compared to the refinery types and the big companies. margins cannot be that great on a consistent long term basis.

Ive heard reports that gas stations don't make any (~much) money on gas. They make all their money on inside sales, like candy, pop, smut mags, donuts

mmmm..... donuts.....
http://www.sib.hb.se/norrland/homer_drool.gif


The problem is, when gas stations hike prices, people grumble. When taxes are levied on gas, people scream murder and demand recalls. Prices here have gone up ~$0.80 since I bought my car, and $0.05 of that is a new tax - but it's the nickel that I hear people gripe about.

Screw 'em. Then they can buy a car that gets better mileage. If taxes on gas reduce the tax burden elsewhere, then that's fine by me. At least then it's a "use" tax. if you drive (i.e. use the roadways), then you can pay extra to keep them in good shape.

pdz
08-21-2003, 10:48 AM
What he said. Does everyone really think that making the commuter cars of choice troop transports and towing vehicles instead of regular cars would have no impact on energy costs?

(what people don't realize is that those SUVs don't even meet the safety standards set for passenger cars. GASP).

but it is ridiculous that they are not subject to gas guzzler excise taxes. i'm all for not only raising the taxation on fuel but also taxation on vehicles based on CO2 emissions like they do in the UK.

that way you'd have to think pretty damn carefully whether or not you want to get nailed on both ends: it would be a great filter for whether people really need to sit higher or if they need the space.

nate
08-21-2003, 01:11 PM
$1.71 for 93

nate
08-21-2003, 01:13 PM
The only problem, is that gas stations are taking the extra profit. If there's going to be high gas prices, then I'd much rather see uncle sam take the profits in the form of tax $$$. That way, like you've mentioned before, the money can go towards fixing roadways and improving pubic transit.

It is called scarcity.

I'd much rather see oil companies making profits because thier products are in high demand than the government distorting energy markets any further.

Mr. Sparkle
08-21-2003, 05:11 PM
I paid $2.40 yesterday. :tsk:

RCK
08-21-2003, 10:43 PM
The only problem, is that gas stations are taking the extra profit. If there's going to be high gas prices, then I'd much rather see uncle sam take the profits in the form of tax $$$. That way, like you've mentioned before, the money can go towards fixing roadways and improving pubic transit.

We need to remember that a gas station is a business and we all need to make money to survive. The actual cost of gas has gone up, therefore the price we pay will go up. We pay plenty of taxes already and that alone should pay for public transit and roadways; and sadly enough, it does not. You can blame our local and state government for that! :tsk:

pdz
08-22-2003, 08:28 AM
as long as diesel fuel is excepted or subsidized, actually, this country will be okay in the long run. 18 wheelers are the backbone of the transportation for goods, so obviously protecting them is a good idea.

but to protect SUV owners is........foolish.

let's get this straight: vehicles are a privilege (1), no one makes those people buy large 4500lb+ vehicles (2), and to keep taxes and safety standards on cars that are not applied to SUVs is silly (3).

therefore, i will gladly pay $5.00 a gallon for premium fuel. mostly because that means the people who choose to run around town in 4800 pound juggernauts with 30 gallon fuel tanks will go the way of the dinosaur and life will settle back into those who need them will buy them and those who do not won't.

Mr. The Edge
08-22-2003, 08:29 AM
Poor folks walk or take the transits. SUVs drivers are not poor. Maybe $5.00/gallon will fix some of the dilapidated roads?

uh, no they don't. Not here anyway.

TD
08-22-2003, 08:31 AM
as long as diesel fuel is excepted or subsidized, actually, this country will be okay in the long run. 18 wheelers are the backbone of the transportation for goods, so obviously protecting them is a good idea.

but to protect SUV owners is........foolish.

let's get this straight: vehicles are a privilege (1), no one makes those people buy large 4500lb+ vehicles (2), and to keep taxes and safety standards on cars that are not applied to SUVs is silly (3).

therefore, i will gladly pay $5.00 a gallon for premium fuel. mostly because that means the people who choose to run around town in 4800 pound juggernauts with 30 gallon fuel tanks will go the way of the dinosaur and life will settle back into those who need them will buy them and those who do not won't.
:thumbup:

nate
08-22-2003, 09:30 AM
as long as diesel fuel is excepted or subsidized, actually, this country will be okay in the long run. 18 wheelers are the backbone of the transportation for goods, so obviously protecting them is a good idea.

but to protect SUV owners is........foolish.

let's get this straight: vehicles are a privilege (1), no one makes those people buy large 4500lb+ vehicles (2), and to keep taxes and safety standards on cars that are not applied to SUVs is silly (3).

therefore, i will gladly pay $5.00 a gallon for premium fuel. mostly because that means the people who choose to run around town in 4800 pound juggernauts with 30 gallon fuel tanks will go the way of the dinosaur and life will settle back into those who need them will buy them and those who do not won't.

Won't people just start driving diesel SUVs then?

Not taxing diesel is just foolish then, you are simply distorting the fuel market towards diesel and higher air pollution from diesel fumes. You people need to stop making foolish emotional arguments against SUVs and think with your heads about the real consequences of your beliefs.

The HACK
08-22-2003, 09:43 AM
Won't people just start driving diesel SUVs then?

Not taxing diesel is just foolish then, you are simply distorting the fuel market towards diesel and higher air pollution from diesel fumes. You people need to stop making foolish emotional arguments against SUVs and think with your heads about the real consequences of your beliefs.

I'd still rather have diesel SUVs than gasoline SUVs. Diesel engine makes so much more sense for SUVs and trucks than gasoline based SUVs. Diesel engine has much better low end torque and fuel economy than engines of the equivalent displacement.

nate
08-22-2003, 09:48 AM
I'd still rather have diesel SUVs than gasoline SUVs. Diesel engine makes so much more sense for SUVs and trucks than gasoline based SUVs. Diesel engine has much better low end torque and fuel economy than engines of the equivalent displacement.

I would too, but that is not the point.

pdz
08-22-2003, 01:19 PM
Won't people just start driving diesel SUVs then?

Not taxing diesel is just foolish then, you are simply distorting the fuel market towards diesel and higher air pollution from diesel fumes. You people need to stop making foolish emotional arguments against SUVs and think with your heads about the real consequences of your beliefs.

foolish emotional argument is the one 90% of the people who drive SUVs use to rationalize their purchase.

mine is a very pragmatic approach. first, do we have a diesel issue in america with high sulfur content? yes. we do. is that going to change? likely.

second, do you really think the lemmings are going to suddenly vault into diesel engine'd SUVs? i don't think so. your average american won't put up with the racket. again, reinforcing the notion that my parameters will select in a very strong fashion for those member of society who actually need the space, towing capacity, or durability of an SUV.

third, my approach, in reducing the number of SUVs on the road, through higher pricing pressure on gasoline would reduce in bulk the sheer numbers of SUVs on the road. as in part ONE, there will simply not be a commensurate increase in diesel based SUVs due to the tastes of the american auto market so in effect, my plan REDUCES emissions and as you know, SUVs are also not regulated as cars are for emissions of pollutants and those truck based V8s and v6s are some of the biggest polluting passenger powerplants on the road.

fourth, i'd like to address the emotional argument issue. let's think about this. SUVs have higher centers of gravity than average cars. most SUVs brake worse than cars as it's a clear place where manufacturers cut costs in addition to crappy tires....this plus the inordinately high weight makes for very, very long braking distances. oh? what's that? what is emotional about wanting to reduce the numbers of lead sleds that brake like pigs on ice? i'd like to see SUVs pay the same gaz guzzler taxes, have the same safety measures applied, and to also pay for ruining the roads? yes, of course, these are all highly emotional arguments.

i have no issue with people choosing to buy SUVs. it's their decision. but please, no crying because you cannot have your cake and eat it, also.

RCK
08-22-2003, 07:14 PM
:yikes: :yikes: $2.35 for Super :yikes: :yikes:

SupraRZ
08-22-2003, 09:28 PM
It seems like everyone on this post is against SUV's, don't mock my poor X5 :(

I had to pay $45 to fill up my X5 at $2.17 at the cheapest 76 station in irvine. I think I can hold out for at least 2 weeks because I remembered filling up the tank in my camry before the pipes exploded :D

I noticed my gf paid a gas guzzler tax for M3, I was like WTF? Here's some political garbage for you guys. To me, it's another excuse to add luxury tax to people who can afford "top of the line" vehicles. A new 540i gets 18/24, almost EXACTLY the same as M3, with a larger engine, seats the same number of people, and yet, no gas guzzler tax. My X5 4.4 is 13/18, I'm getting closer to 8, no gas guzzler tax. My twin turbo supra gets an average of 8mpg, yet no gas guzzler tax. I got 15mpg on my 4 cylinder camry, I dont remember a gas guzzler tax for that either.

Brian Randell
08-23-2003, 06:10 AM
And yea, verily, the populace of Phoenix, Arizona, doth lift their voices up in lament...I saw a picture on the Net (wish I could find it) of a gas station in Phoenix with prices like $3.99 :yikes:

Back in The Land Of Bovine Living (I tell you, it's got to be the platinum salts in California gasoline...Karl Bimmer's last fill-up was $31.99 - $2.219/gallon for premium unleaded. The prices tend to be higher in places like The People's Republic Of Irvine.

And, his gas mileage has been going down lately, due to the mild, balmy, Southern California summer :rolleyes: - it was up to 26.5 at one point, but now is down to 25.9 :( (the M drivers are not loving life at this point when they pull up to the pumps...but the drive to the pumps is worth it :bigpimp: )

I recall that the 330 actually gets better mileage than the 325? I've actually considered getting a Mini as a daily driver; I went down to the dealer and sat in one, but the interior is, er, interesting :rolleyes:

Yes, you're so right I feel the pain everytime. But, I still fly more than I drive so I eat it on plane tickets instead of at the pump. I've only got 5,773 miles as last night.

I just filled up on 8/20 and I paid $2.189 for 91 oct.

Since I got my car my lowest was $1.699 on 7/30, highest was $2.339 on 4/12 coming back from Bimmerfest.

My avg MPG is 16.55 with an average speed of 38.76 MPH. Best 20.03, worst 13.53.

The bottom line, I picked my car and love it and pay ($$$) the price.

Cheers,

Brian

3LOU5
08-23-2003, 07:55 AM
Well, my gas guage lit up last night and I decided that it was time to fill up. :eeps:

When I checked my OBC, it said I had 35 miles left until empty.
:eeps: :eeps:

I pulled up to the gas pump to fill it.......at $2.40/gallon.
:eeps: :eeps: :eeps:

After all was said and done, my wallet was $35.67 lighter.

To me, that is my all-time record. :bawling:

But back to the question, yeah, I see it going to $3.00/gallon.....but hopefully not anytime soon.

ObD
08-23-2003, 09:49 AM
I hope it never goes up to $2.00

:D

Paid $2.00 yesterday. :doh:

ObD
08-23-2003, 09:53 AM
It is called scarcity.

I'd much rather see oil companies making profits because thier products are in high demand than the government distorting energy markets any further.

We're from the gov't and we're here to help. Yea, right. :rolleyes:

CascadeTelcom
08-25-2003, 07:09 PM
I hope so. :eeps:

How else are individuals, corporations and gov't agencies going to be convinced to conserve, build more fuel efficient systems, develop and support alternative energy systems, build and utilize mass transit, support carpool/walk/ride to work, promote telecommuting/flexible work schedules and convince people to live closer to work?

Flame retardant suit is *ON*

We need to take the following actions to get the price of a barrel of crude to under $25.00 so the economic recovery can move ahead and gasoline prices reduced to approximately $1.50 per gallon:
1. More drilling, off shore, certainly in Alaska. The Cariboo love the warm pipes to heat their butts in the Winter. How many people visit or take vacations in the Artic?
2. Put OPEC out of business by drilling elsewhere. They need competition.
3. Build new modern refineries.
3. Get the envirnomental whackos out of Congress.
4. Reduce the number of blends required by the State Dreamers so the refineries could produce three grades of gasoline instead of over 50.

Plenty of fossil reserves out there if they could be developed ASAP.

pdz
08-26-2003, 07:55 AM
We need to take the following actions to get the price of a barrel of crude to under $25.00 so the economic recovery can move ahead and gasoline prices reduced to approximately $1.50 per gallon:
1. More drilling, off shore, certainly in Alaska. The Cariboo love the warm pipes to heat their butts in the Winter. How many people visit or take vacations in the Artic?
2. Put OPEC out of business by drilling elsewhere. They need competition.
3. Build new modern refineries.
3. Get the envirnomental whackos out of Congress.
4. Reduce the number of blends required by the State Dreamers so the refineries could produce three grades of gasoline instead of over 50.

Plenty of fossil reserves out there if they could be developed ASAP.

if the economic recovery is predicated on the world around it being static or completely under the thumb of uncle sam, then i don't WANT that sort of recovery because that's just another bubble that will burst.

i think that it is ridiculous for a group of people who pay $15,000 to $30,000 and more than the price of the average car in america to complain about the price of gas. have any of these complainers been even to canada? let alone japan or the UK? you bought an expensive car, go out and enjoy it. the price of gasoline, unless you are living above your means, is irrelevant. take a back country road and drive the car.

enjoy.

and as far as SUV owners: sorry, man. that sucks that you can't buy what you want and also have cheap gas. that's really, really unfair. while we're at it, why don't we also complain that not everyone can get into ivy league schools. why don't we complain that not everyone can afford to go on nice vacations every year. man, life is rotten. we're all entitled to SO much.

:D

tgravo2
08-26-2003, 10:14 AM
I just gassed up. $1.81 for 93 octane, that's the most I've ever paid :(

MikeW
08-26-2003, 11:02 AM
How expensive does gas have to get before:

a). It becomes a political issue. Remember all those Suv drivers, and car drivers who'd rather pay less than more, vote.

b). Gas gets profitable enough that the oil companies decide to cash in (more) by raising production.

Gas in expensive in Europe, Japan, et al. because it's taxed to the moon in order to finance their bloated social welfare systems. We dabbled in social welfare, but, thankfully, seemed to be moving away (we may have drifted back in the wrong direction with the whole medicare drug benefit thing). However, the US is structurally a more socially conservative place then, especially, Europe. I doubt there'd ever be broad based support for punitive gas taxes.

pdz
08-26-2003, 11:12 AM
i think regardless of whether or not people would like to think america is capitalist, it is still very socialist and has tremendous socialistic tendencies. and in the new era where revenue is down, taxation is likely to keep going up. and if it is not overt, as in right at the pump, it will sooner or later be applied to vehicle weight and vehicle emissions as these make sense and could be argued that these are not regressive like increasing gas pricing is. "poor people" don't have to buy SUVs, so i'm sure that this will happen before gas pricing shoots up.

look around you at the roads you see. unless you live in west virginia where the highways are immaculate, the roads are likely to be in disrepair and that trend accelerates, the more people buy SUVs. this is a simple concept. heavier people wear out shoes and car shocks sooner than lighter people. SUVs wear out roads faster than cars do, vehicle per vehicle, day after day, season after season. a more concrete concept is to look at driveways where people have 2 SUVs versus people with 2 cars, roughly basing it on both driveways using the same base and mixture or material. whose is going to wear out faster?

i think, in times where state revenues are going to run deficits because of the socialistic policies in America, that it just makes sense to target places where revenues can quickly be increased. tolls. vehicle taxes based on net value, weight, emissions. none of this hurts "poor" people. all that it does is make people a little more accountable for what vehicles they drive.

you don't hear any of us crying about our insurance premiums, do you? we all choose nice cars. so why, again, are we crying about gas prices?

SteveM
08-26-2003, 05:05 PM
This entire gas pricing scheme is based upon what 'the men behind the curtain'* think they can get away with.

Example:
Premium gas in Orange County CA on 8/23 was about $2.33 per gallon (an all-time high). The media reports the higher prices are due to the AZ pipeline break, and the midwest power failure. We drove from SoCal to Vegas on 8/23 and filled up before leaving and upon arrival in Vegas. We paid $2.33 in Orange County, and $2.11 in Vegas.

This seems like gouging since all SoCal gas is refined and trucked locally which has nothing to do with a pipeline break in AZ. Why is gas cheaper in a highway tourist stop in Vegas than in Socal? Probably only because they think the market will bear that price.
I also think that the prices are increasing because of the upcoming 3 day weekend and the increased travel associated.

*'men behind the curtain' is either the oil companies, or local station owners; whoever is profiting most from increased prices.


OK. I'll get off my soap box now.

RCK
08-26-2003, 05:47 PM
Well its @ $2.37/gallon for 91 octane here in Westlake Village, CA :eek: :tsk:

SupraRZ
08-26-2003, 09:19 PM
Well its @ $2.37/gallon for 91 octane here in Westlake Village, CA :eek: :tsk:

Doh, I'm down to 1/4 tank on the X5 and 1/8 tank on the Camry :(

Can't.... hold.... out.... any.... longer.......

andy_thomas
08-27-2003, 02:57 AM
foolish emotional argument is the one 90% of the people who drive SUVs use to rationalize their purchase.

mine is a very pragmatic approach. first, do we have a diesel issue in america with high sulfur content? yes. we do. is that going to change? likely.

second, do you really think the lemmings are going to suddenly vault into diesel engine'd SUVs? i don't think so. your average american won't put up with the racket...

Ever driven an X5 3.0d? Probably not. If, after over ten years of BMW making diesel engines which are as good or better than most petrol engines, the US public cannot be persuaded to even get in one because they think they're weak, smelly and noisy, then its curtains for the prospect of US-market diesels, forever. Shame; BMW spends a lot more effort on its diesels than it does its petrols, and in five years' time, when BMW's diesels are considerably more powerful and efficient than the equivalent petrol (as opposed to being slightly more powerful/efficient right now) the average SUV-totin' Joe will still think diesel is for big rigs.

Not that I'm particularly fond of diesels; still too much combustion NVH at idle for me. But in an X5, or a small 3er used in a city a lot, it makes a lot of sense.

pdz
08-27-2003, 07:50 AM
Ever driven an X5 3.0d? Probably not. If, after over ten years of BMW making diesel engines which are as good or better than most petrol engines, the US public cannot be persuaded to even get in one because they think they're weak, smelly and noisy, then its curtains for the prospect of US-market diesels, forever. Shame; BMW spends a lot more effort on its diesels than it does its petrols, and in five years' time, when BMW's diesels are considerably more powerful and efficient than the equivalent petrol (as opposed to being slightly more powerful/efficient right now) the average SUV-totin' Joe will still think diesel is for big rigs.

Not that I'm particularly fond of diesels; still too much combustion NVH at idle for me. But in an X5, or a small 3er used in a city a lot, it makes a lot of sense.

well, i think most of us who know anything about the assortment of BMWs in the UK would want to drive the 330d variant. it sounds awesome.

btw, premium in MA is about $2.05 right now. the look on that ford exploder owner's face as he was filling up last night next to me was priceless.

pdz
08-27-2003, 08:42 AM
USATODAY, that titan of journalistic excellence, has something very appropriate for this thread today:

http://www.usatoday.com/money/industries/energy/2003-08-26-gasprices_x.htm

BmW4EveR330ci
08-27-2003, 03:40 PM
Ahhhhhh... another day at the pump.

Drove my 330 to a local chevron station and could not believe my eyes. Yesterday's 92 premium was priced at $2.36. Thinking that not much would change overnight, the price was at $2.41 today. A jump of .05cent overnight. Unbelievable! No choice and decided to fill up today before another drastic increase inevitably will occur.

Thought it was a rip at where I filled-up, drove another 5 minutes and came across another Chevron. This time, 92 premium was priced at $2.59. Do I feel fortunate? No choice, need gas to run car like everyone else on the road.

:thumbdwn:

Sean
08-27-2003, 04:12 PM
If it hits $3.00 a gallon I will be walking. That's $63.00 a week to fill up my daily driver (92 525i -21 gallons) :yikes:

Currently 93 is $1.79-$1.81 in Knoxville, Tennessee.

It cost me nearly $28.00 to fill the 330 up coming back from Nashville a few weeks ago.

FireFly
08-28-2003, 12:10 PM
If it hits $3.00 a gallon I will be walking. That's $63.00 a week to fill up my daily driver (92 525i -21 gallons) :yikes:

Currently 93 is $1.79-$1.81 in Knoxville, Tennessee.

It cost me nearly $28.00 to fill the 330 up coming back from Nashville a few weeks ago.

I guess it was a good move for me to start working from my home office 2 weeks ago rather than commuting 30 miles each way. But I did fill up the SUV and the BMW yesterday- $1.89 for 87 (Explorer) and $2.00 for 93 (BMW)- What a freakin rip off!

HW
08-28-2003, 12:54 PM
0.92/L for 87 up here.
=1.09/L for 92 = 3.10US/G ! :mad:

SupraRZ
08-28-2003, 04:11 PM
I'll pay $2 for gas anyday. I just paid $49 to fill up the X5 last night... went 239 miles on 23 gallons. Car is just used to run errands, I do work from home as well. $2/gal you have it easy :)

pdz
08-29-2003, 01:38 PM
first off: are any of you old enough to remember the cabbage patch dolls the first xmas they came out?

MAIN POINT: it's shocking that speculators and wholesalers would bid up the prices of a commodity in this country! shocking!

i mean, i pointed it out and HW reinforced the notion, but go drive your BMW in canada for a weekend. they're already paying $3 a gallon. i don't hear them complainin'.

SupraRZ
08-29-2003, 05:20 PM
It's ok for gas to be expensive in canada, because living expenses are cheaper there, so it kind of justifies the expensive gas :thumbup:

HW
08-29-2003, 05:58 PM
i mean, i pointed it out and HW reinforced the notion, but go drive your BMW in canada for a weekend. they're already paying $3 a gallon. i don't hear them complainin'.

g' knows that i swear each time i see 0.919/L when i pass by a gas station. you bet we're complaining. :mad: i can tolerate it for now but not for an extended period. and living expenses are NOT cheaper here.

also we make less when you factor in the exchange rate but calculate the price of gas here in usd and it's 3.10USD/G! :mad:

Bobby 325i
08-29-2003, 06:18 PM
I filled up the BMW today at Amoco. I paid $2.15 per gallon here in Queens,NYC. I swear, if it gets to $3/gallon I will invest some money in a new pair of sneakers and use the train and buses..:p. $2/gallon I can deal with. Besides, why did gas go up soo suddenly?:dunno:

Gas goes up to $3/gallon, Time to get stomping on your Air Force Ones:p:D

AndDown
08-30-2003, 10:25 AM
I'll pay $2 for gas anyday. I just paid $49 to fill up the X5 last night... went 239 miles on 23 gallons. Car is just used to run errands, I do work from home as well. $2/gal you have it easy :)

That's about 10 mpg, shouldn't you be getting more than that? I get about 16-17mpg with short commutes as well. I have a 3.0, but it shouldn't make that much of a difference from a 4.4. :dunno:

pdz
08-30-2003, 12:19 PM
That's about 10 mpg, shouldn't you be getting more than that? I get about 16-17mpg with short commutes as well. I have a 3.0, but it shouldn't make that much of a difference from a 4.4. :dunno:

nah, i think what RZ's getting is about right, actually. and it is likely an accurate reflection of what most V8 powered sport utes would get, driven with some vigor, in mixed city driving.

282hp and 4800 pounds, stopping, accelerating constantly. that's about right.

i mean, maybe we could expect 13mpg as a good goal for a 4.4i X5, but i know when i had an SUV with the GM vortec 4200 (270hp) and got 12mpg.

Patrick330i
08-31-2003, 11:30 PM
I hope so. :eeps:

How else are individuals, corporations and gov't agencies going to be convinced to conserve, build more fuel efficient systems, develop and support alternative energy systems, build and utilize mass transit, support carpool/walk/ride to work, promote telecommuting/flexible work schedules and convince people to live closer to work?

Flame retardant suit is *ON*

Portland, huh? Nothing else to say. No flame! :p

SupraRZ
09-01-2003, 04:51 AM
That's about 10 mpg, shouldn't you be getting more than that? I get about 16-17mpg with short commutes as well. I have a 3.0, but it shouldn't make that much of a difference from a 4.4. :dunno:

On the 3.0, does your mpg needle stays bottomed out until you hit 35-40mpg? Mine does =X.

With my X5 I drive much more conservatively than if I was driving my Camry (4cyl 17mpg) or Supra (7-12mpg). From where I live, I have to pass at least 3-5 stop signs to get anywhere..... These are 40mph roads with stop signs every 500-1000ft to prevent thru traffic from penetrating these streets. I do notice that everytime my foot is on the gas (no matter how slight), the mpg needle bottoms out until I've reached 35-40mph, usually at this point I have to start pressing brakes for the next stop sign! All the major streets in town are 50-60mph with intersections every 1/4 - 1/2 mile.

So, with "granny" driving 90% city on one tank, I'll get about 10-11mpg. If I'm in any slight hurry, I'll easy hit 6-8 range. If I'm in a *real* hurry, then the mpg stops at 5.8. I'm sure BMW put this here for a reason, so I don't know my *real* MPG when I'm in a huge hurry. eek: But this usually doesn't happen anymore because I just graduated from college and I don't have to wait for my laggy gf anymore :D

SupraRZ
09-01-2003, 04:52 AM
BTW my friend called me when he saw gas for $2.59 at a mobile station in SFV today....