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View Full Version : How to replace your coolant pipe, valve covers, timing gaskets and more


wilson009
12-06-2009, 10:16 AM
This will be my blog-log for installing the Coolant pipe kit, Alternator Timing Coversetc. Will post my successes and failures with pics. Hopefully mostly success!


In Retrospect this should have been titled my 745 R&R project... Lots of stuff out here so don't get confused. I'll try to make separate DIY's after I'm done.

Hopefully this will help others out there in similar situations and save you some serious money. :)


Note: During this project I am also replacing my leaking upper timing, lower timing covers, which requires removal of the valve covers. You do NOT need to remove the valve covers for the Coolant pipe Replacement.


I am also replacing a Bad Alternator and a few other maintenance items.

wilson009
12-06-2009, 10:33 AM
First check out this post by 07841-tb
http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=405705&highlight=head+gasket

Also 2002 has a fan attached to the waterpump and a water cooled alternator. 2003 up do not.

Also if your going to do this make sure you have a copy of The TIS.

Tools:

Metric Sockets and ratchets several sizes and angles will help you get into the back with odd angles.
metric torx socket set
metric inverted socket set
NM Torque ratchet

Disconnect Battery in the rear. -Replace the battery if your car is 6 years old or more. Its worth the preventative maint.


Remove the Fan Cowl
Remove Fan
Drain the antifreeze
Remove all the hoses
Remove Waterpump.
See waterpump DIY
remove both belt tensioners
http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=414607

wilson009
12-06-2009, 10:51 AM
One you have all the hoses labeled and moved out of the way.
Remove the Expansion Tank and the Air Filter and Box.

A key to this project is to make as much space in the engine to work as possible.


Wire Harness.


Get yourself a labeler or labels and start unplugging the wire harness.

Feed everything out and use string or zipties to hang the wire harness to the back of the hood out of the way.

wilson009
12-06-2009, 11:08 AM
Making Space in the engine compartment.

Remove the Partition Wall. About 4 bolts and 2 screws.
Remove the Cabin air filters on passenger and driver side. Also the Adapter hose from the filter that goes through the firewall It comes off easily with by a clip with a flathead.

wilson009
12-06-2009, 11:14 AM
Remove the Injection System.

Couple of screws on the top.

Look for a valve on the top. Same fitting that you would blow air into your tires.

Sent low pressure air 3psi into it. This pushes the gas backwards into the tank.

Lift the injectors straight up. - Replace all the seals on this while its out.

Disconnect the hose and set aside.

wilson009
12-06-2009, 11:51 AM
Remove Passenger Side Valve Cover.

Remove 13 Bolts

2 bolts are hidden under 2 ground cables. Remove the ground cable and then the bolts.

Remove the Servomotor and the metal plate underneath. make note to Replace the seal underneath.

Remove plates around Intermediate Shaft Sensors in the back these sensors sit underneath the valve covers and work on the timing. They are expensive to replace. but if your car is open your better off replacing it now instead of having to open the car again. #11-37-7-527-017


Remove the Injection Valve Wire harness. This is a attached via a clip and pops off easy.
Lift up the levers on the ignition coils and unplug the wires.

Lift up the harness and attach with other harness suspended on the hood.


Pull out the ignition coils. They slide right out


Break the seal slowly on the valve cover. Do not force.

The sparkplug domes will fall off as you lift. I reached in and pulled them out. BMW recommends these be replaced but they are 27 a piece. so i'll inspect them closer.

Getting the valve cover off involved twisting and lifting over the shaft sensors. Makes me wonder how difficult its gonna be when i need to put it back on but I'll cross that bridge later.

wilson009
12-06-2009, 12:11 PM
Driver side valve cover



Driver side Valve cover is the same process just different angles.

You will need to release and move the ARS container and a few small things to get the ratchet in there.

-more pics and pics with covers off

wilson009
12-06-2009, 12:30 PM
more pics valve covers off

wilson009
12-06-2009, 12:42 PM
Air Intake Manifold

Remove 8 screws.

Unclip on more sensor on the rear. I used 2 flathead screwdrivers. Very Awkward.

Lift Right off.

I noticed some oil residue in one of the hose valves see pic. Plan to open the intake manifold later.

johndade
12-06-2009, 12:51 PM
Excellent write up wilson. Keep it coming. And let us know when your all done how she runs. All the work you done to it lately you should be running worry free soon.

Keif
12-06-2009, 01:40 PM
Beautiful! Keep up the good work!

wilson009
12-06-2009, 02:37 PM
Getting to the pipe.

After pulling the Air Intake. A pan sit above the pipe. Take the screws off and pull of exposing the pipe.


Take a SawSaw or Jig Saw and cut the pipe in half.

From there I just pulled out the pipes out. I didn't need to drill a hole and use a block to wedge it out.

Seal in the front was a corroded mess. The seal in the rear looked brand new.


Engine is ready for the Pipe Kit.



Waiting on the mail now.

wilson009
12-06-2009, 02:54 PM
more pics of the cooling pipe

Figured the pipe deserved its own area since its the root of the problems

Judd944
12-06-2009, 05:28 PM
excellent work so far! how soon until your part comes in? was the car leaking from the rear or the front seal?

mbz1
12-06-2009, 07:45 PM
All the ones that have gone bad, that i have seen on here have all had green coolant, not the blue coolant that bmw uses.. wonder if that has anything to do with the seal going bad?:dunno:

johndade
12-06-2009, 07:48 PM
I was thinking same thing ^

Wilassasin
12-07-2009, 11:26 AM
Great job so far!

wilson009
12-07-2009, 05:10 PM
All the ones that have gone bad, that i have seen on here have all had green coolant, not the blue coolant that bmw uses.. wonder if that has anything to do with the seal going bad?:dunno:

No Clue. You could make a survey? :)

The gasket on the front is clearly degraded and corroded. The other seal is like new in the rear. But it has a different design more traditional oring.

I think it may have to due with heat and its contact with the engine. It has direct contact with the engine block. Clearly a poor material choice that breaks down overtime.

07841-tb
12-07-2009, 05:57 PM
All the ones that have gone bad, that i have seen on here have all had green coolant, not the blue coolant that bmw uses.. wonder if that has anything to do with the seal going bad?:dunno:

My car actually had the bmw coolant in it when the leak started. The pics I posted showed green coolant from me topping it off to find the leak.

07841-tb
12-07-2009, 06:01 PM
Looking good dude, keep it up.:thumbup:

UltZeven
12-08-2009, 12:54 AM
Amazing write up! Cheers!

wilson009
12-09-2009, 07:30 AM
Ok for those just doing the All German project. you have do use a wire brush to remove the old seal in the front which is fused to the engine block. This is why I think heat contact is the main cause of this weephole problem(my opinion only) Once the pipe is installed everything just goes in reverse.

I'm going deeper because I have more problems.


Sooo moving on

Removing the WaterCooled Alternator.

I have to say up until this point everything had been surprisingly pleasant.

Now it gets dirty and frustrating

Few bolts on the front of the alternator housing No problem come right out.

Alternator will not budge. This is because there is a bracket that secures the alternator from behind and the bolts are impossible to reach or fit a hand in.

So I dropped the Front Stabilizer Bar/ dynamic drive. I did this by removing the 4 screws securing it to the axle, taking off the bolts, swing support, and loosing the vent pipe which is the black and yellow wire connecting to motor on the stabilizer bar. if you follow the vent pipe it goes to a small fuel filter on the drivers side pop it out and and you can drop the bar.

http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts.do?model=GL63&mospid=47777&btnr=31_0632&hg=31&fg=10


After dropping the stabilizer bar i bought a set of metric racheting wrenches. Using a 13MM I was able to get my hand in and release the bracket and release the alternator.

wow what a pain. Difficult to get good pictures in there. Did my best.

wilson009
12-09-2009, 07:36 AM
couple more pics involved with alternator removal

07841-tb
12-09-2009, 08:12 AM
Hey Ed, Why are you removing the Alternator? The reason I ask is because when installing the All German expandable pipe , it does not require removing the timing cover.

Blue Bimmer
12-09-2009, 10:00 AM
Hey Ed, Why are you removing the Alternator? The reason I ask is because when installing the All German expandable pipe , it does not require removing the timing cover.

I think he said he "is going deeper for other issues", so doing more than necessary for the coolant pipe issue.

I thought Keif did his alternator recently and didn't have to drop too much to get to it?

wilson009
12-09-2009, 10:03 AM
My alternator went bad. It was sending out 15 volts and higher. So I'm getting that taking care of while i'm in there.

I realize the All German kit stopped one step above but since my Valve covers leaked then my upper timing covers leaked. Based on that I'd hate to do all this work only to have the lower timing cover start leaking. Plus I want to replace some of the timing guide rails if I can get in there.

hotrod2448
12-09-2009, 10:23 AM
Good write up. While this far into it you might as well yank the heads too and do a nice p n' p and port match on them and manifolds.:rofl:

wilson009
12-09-2009, 10:46 AM
Good write up. While this far into it you might as well yank the heads too and do a nice p n' p and port match on them and manifolds.:rofl:


Now that is way beyond my abilities! I'd love to just replace the head gaskets they are so close. But NO WAY! :tsk:


I'm considering Giving up on the lower Timing Gasket.

Getting the Alternator housing off to get the lower timing off requires dropping the driver axle and motor mount! Plus I cannot budge the Crankshaft bolt going counterclockwise with a 580lb impact wrench.

I guess a question is if the Valve covers leaked then the upper timing covers leaked after I had the valve cover gaskets replaced then would the lower timing cover be at risk of leaking? as well as the seal by the alternator housing and crankshaft seal? Why not just get them all replaced why I have the engine open.
Maybe a question for BMW_Tech?

Keif
12-09-2009, 12:43 PM
Alternator-related:

I didn't drop the sway bar to pull the alternator off, but that will obviously give you more room. Instead, I unbolted the power steering pump and pushed it forward and out of the way, then used a crows' foot wrench to loosen/tighten the idler pulley bolts. Lawyeradam just did something similar in getting his alternator out.

I did drop my sway bar recently to replace its bushings. A word of caution, be very careful about how much you tighten up the nuts on that, I snapped one before it was anywhere close to the proper torque, and those upper ones look nasty to get out if you do break them.
 

lawyeradam
12-09-2009, 02:10 PM
I just did the same alternator repair using the Keif Removal Plan. Luckily I talked to him ahead of time (and many times during....) and got those crows feet sockets.. also, loosening the power steering pump and moving the resoirvoir down as much as possible was absolutely neccesary. The key for me was to have some towels to support my head so I could lay there and focus as comfortably as possible during the removal of those little idler bolts. The good news is putting it back together was a whole lot easier!

wilson009
12-09-2009, 03:20 PM
Yeah I dropped the Power Steering pump too afterward to see the housing better.

I am also replacing the rubber mountings on the stabilizer bar the Keif did a while back. So I had motivation to take it off.

I'll post some pics of the bolts in question soon.

wilson009
12-09-2009, 06:18 PM
CrankShaft Bolt.....

This BadBoy deserves its one little section. Thanks to 07841-tb for the help.

This thing would not Move. I tried 540lb impact at 120 psi and got nothing.

Finally I bumped the PSI to 140 with a 900lb 1/2 impact and put a torch on it for about five minutes then hit it. It came off fast and smoking. :guitar:

So yes to remove the Crank Shaft Bolt you go CounterClock Wise (left Loosely) and have a 25 gallon air compressor and a HD Impact!






I really think my car must have got pretty hot at some point in its life

wilson009
12-09-2009, 06:24 PM
Keif Regarding the lower Timing Cover. It seems to me the Alternator Housing sits directly in front of the lower Timing cover. See Pics
07841-tb can you comment to this too?

07841-tb
12-09-2009, 08:09 PM
Yes, that is correct that damn alternator housing bracket bolts on top of the lower timing cover. PAIN IN THE BUTT!!!!:mad:

Keif
12-10-2009, 09:51 AM
Memory FAIL! I stand corrected. =] ...edited previous post.

I'm glad to see that the crankshaft bolt is difficult to get off...because of one of these bolts (loosened up somehow) I had the vibration damper hop off my old E3 (Bavaria) and eat up its woodruff key in the parking lot of a non-local airport. Bad day! Took me a week to find a new 25-cent woodruff key!!

http://failblog.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/fail-owned-memory-ad-fail.jpg?w=454&h=395
 

wilson009
12-10-2009, 11:40 AM
Removing the Vacuum Pump on Passenger Side Upper Timing Gasket.

The Vacuum Pumps purpose is create vacuum as the valvetronic system reduces the manifold vacuum. Plays into Breakbooster. Usually found on Diesels.... So the local repair guy might be confused.


Press brakes to remove pressure on breakbooster
Remove Vacuum Hoses
Release inverted Torx screws

installing per TIS
Replace Seals
Align drive to fit into engine
Veritical alignment is best
If you can't get it to go in. Crank Engine at Bolt to line up vertically.
Attach Vacuum hoses to ensure no damage to engine gaskets occurs.

wilson009
12-10-2009, 12:15 PM
Removing the Solenoid Valves

I have no idea what they do other than control oil flow in the engine.

The seals will leak with age. Very easy to fix.

Loosing Clips and turn them around.
Unplug Wires
Using BMW Specialty Tool Flat Head Screw Driver Pop them out and label.
Replace seals and reinsert.

wilson009
12-10-2009, 04:16 PM
Intake Manifold Gasket Question

I removed my old Manifold gasket so I could start getting the engine clean and prepped for assembly.

I noticed that oil had seeped below the gaskets and weeped out onto the block.
I suspect the gaskets were just brittle so it was escaping, but is it normal for the intake manifold to have oil? I know I saw oil in the line that went from the Vacuum pump to the Manifold.

Keif?

07841-tb
12-10-2009, 06:17 PM
Intake Manifold Gasket Question

I removed my old Manifold gasket so I could start getting the engine clean and prepped for assembly.

I noticed that oil had seeped below the gaskets and weeped out onto the block.
I suspect the gaskets were just brittle so it was escaping, but is it normal for the intake manifold to have oil? I know I saw oil in the line that went from the Vacuum pump to the Manifold.

Keif?

No, that's not normal. Thats one sign of engine blowby where oil is escaping paste the piston rings and getting into the air intake system.

wilson009
12-10-2009, 06:57 PM
No, that's not normal. Thats one sign of engine blowby where oil is escaping paste the piston rings and getting into the air intake system.


I agree that can be a sign. But I'm an optimist right now...

If that was the case I would expect to see oil on the sparkplugs. I'll pull and check them later. I did some searches and saw where this can be vacuum related as well.

I also have a new set of pressure regulator valves to install as well. I read those things can cause issues with the intake getting gummed up.

The car never smoked and ran well.

07841-tb
12-10-2009, 08:15 PM
Hey, I PM'd you about that Alt. Housing.

wilson009
12-10-2009, 08:57 PM
Here's some more pics of the Intake manifold. There's definitely oil in it.

Not a lot. I'd like to take it apart, it has screws but doesn't look like there's a gasket for it?

Can the manifold be cleaned out? :confused:

Keif
12-10-2009, 09:54 PM
Have you popped out the old CCV's and looked at them yet? That amount of oil seems indicative of those not doing their job properly; even if there was a lot of blow-by (and there will always be some amount), the job of the CCVs and the paths on the undersides of the valve covers is to get the majority of oil out of that air and back down into the pan (and to help regulate pressure, of course). Once those start to break, you'll definitely get more oil pushed (at idle) or sucked (above idle) into the intake manifold. Speaking of which, it's probably about time to do my CCV's.

I haven't read anything about anyone opening up the intake manifold, but it seems pretty simplistic. There is no gasket between the top and bottom halves listed on realoem.com, but I'm sure regular ol' gasket sealant would do just fine.

The VANOS solenoids control oil flow to the different sections of the VANOS units on the intake and exhaust cams (the gears on the front of the cams), making them twist to advance or retard the cams' timings dynamically.
 

hotrod2448
12-11-2009, 07:46 AM
Just out of curiosity, does anyone have an exploded view of what all is in the manifold? RealOEM didn't have anything on what exactly is inside the plenum.

wilson009
12-11-2009, 07:50 AM
Just out of curiosity, does anyone have an exploded view of what all is in the manifold? RealOEM didn't have anything on what exactly is inside the plenum.


I couldn't find any pics anywhere. And some say it doesn't come apart. But it has screws holding it together so I know it comes apart. I am going to attempt to open it as long as it doesn't feel like it will break. Will post pics of it if successful.

hotrod2448
12-11-2009, 08:09 AM
I couldn't find any pics anywhere. And some say it doesn't come apart. But it has screws holding it together so I know it comes apart. I am going to attempt to open it as long as it doesn't feel like it will break. Will post pics of it if successful.

How pissed are you going to be if you take the bolts out, it flies apart and springs of vary size and rate shoot out all over the garage with no clue how to put it back together.:eek::rofl:

Let's hope something like that doesn't happen but, you might want to take good notes of what's in there and how it goes since there seems to be a bit of a lack of available documentation.:thumbup:

wilson009
12-11-2009, 10:59 AM
omg that would be awlful lol. It looks like a giant turbine in ther but ill be careful. I'd almost be to embarrassed to share that if it happened. :)How pissed are you going to be if you take the bolts out, it flies apart and springs of vary size and rate shoot out all over the garage with no clue how to put it back together.:eek::rofl:

Let's hope something like that doesn't happen but, you might want to take good notes of what's in there and how it goes since there seems to be a bit of a lack of available documentation.:thumbup:

hotrod2448
12-11-2009, 02:05 PM
omg that would be awlful lol. It looks like a giant turbine in ther but ill be careful. I'd almost be to embarrassed to share that if it happened. :)

I didn't realize it was a variably manifold. Forget the PNP.:rofl:

There really is no good info out there about how it works. All I could find was this cut away drawing.
http://www.bmwblog.com/wp-content/uploads/n62-engine-497x515.jpg

Keif
12-11-2009, 02:46 PM
The motor on the back of it slides the clamshell looking things (the intake runners) to make them shorter or longer to tune the engine (based primarily on RPM, if I recall correctly). I'll try to post some material about it later this evening.
 

wilson009
12-11-2009, 07:42 PM
Ok I think I figured out the source of Oil in my Intake Manifold.

Both hoses that run from the Valve Covers are regulated by pressure regulator valves. Those hoses both have oil in them. Those hoses run directly into the Intake Manifold right? Since I have my car apart I can't just look lol.

But but following the trail of oil it went from the Valve Cover, pressure regulator valve, down the hoses and into the manifold where it weeped through the cracked Intake Manifold Gasket on to the Block or was quickly burned off.

Keif remember when I was getting those valvetronic error codes with No description? I wonder if that was the problem....Just Bad Pressure Regulator Valves

Anyway I'm sure this is the problem. No bad pistons No bad pistons!




During my waterpump install the small black Hose that attaches on the boot right infront of the mass air flow meter to the Throttle broke of at the base. It started running rough after that. I can't figure out where that hose goes to. Somewhere in the back of the engine and probably unrelated........But maybe. :confused:

http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts.do?model=GL63&mospid=47777&btnr=13_0968&hg=13&fg=15 parts 4 and 7

UltZeven
12-11-2009, 08:06 PM
Ok I think I figured out the source of Oil in my Intake Manifold.

Both hoses that run from the Valve Covers are regulated by pressure regulator valves. Those hoses both have oil in them. Those hoses run directly into the Intake Manifold right? Since I have my car apart I can't just look lol.

But but following the trail of oil it went from the Valve Cover, pressure regulator valve, down the hoses and into the manifold where it weeped through the cracked Intake Manifold Gasket on to the Block or was quickly burned off.

Keif remember when I was getting those valvetronic error codes with No description? I wonder if that was the problem....Just Bad Pressure Regulator Valves

Anyway I'm sure this is the problem. No bad pistons No bad pistons!




During my waterpump install the small black Hose that attaches on the boot right infront of the mass air flow meter to the Throttle broke of at the base. It started running rough after that. I can't figure out where that hose goes to. Somewhere in the back of the engine and probably unrelated........But maybe. :confused:

http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts.do?model=GL63&mospid=47777&btnr=13_0968&hg=13&fg=15 parts 4 and 7


Wilson I just replace both of those parts. But mine broke on the boot connector. It did run a little rough and after installing it feels much better. The rubber hose (part # 7 on the link you provided) connects to a metal/aluminum thin pipe that is on the right side of your power steering resevoir. If you look around in that area I'm sure you'll find it easily. I ordered both parts from ECStuning.com (what's cool about these guys is that they're prices are cheaper than RealOEM.com and the dealer). Hope this helps you out. If you can't find that pipe PM me and I'll take a picture and send it to you. :thumbup:

Keif
12-11-2009, 08:41 PM
Yup! ...the hoses from both CCV valves run directly into the upper and lower holes on the face of the intake manifold (see here (http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts.do?model=GL63&mospid=47777&btnr=11_3259&hg=11&fg=15)).

While you have everything apart, make sure the hoses going from the secondary air pump to the secondary air non-return valves (under the back of the intake manifold) don't have any cracks (part #1 here (http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts.do?model=GL63&mospid=47777&btnr=11_3281&hg=11&fg=50)).

On your parts 4 and 7...I broke that a while ago, too. Even a small air leak like that after the mass air meter will definitely cause it to run a little rough / stumble, especially near idle (when there isn't much flow past the air meter to begin with).
 

wilson009
12-12-2009, 11:12 AM
Removing the Alternator Housing

Ok Why remove the alternator housing?
Because one of the brackets sits directly infront of the lower timing case. So To remove the timing lower timing case you remove the alt housing.
However the engine support bracket sit in front of the Alt Housing and is bolted through it on to the Block. Thankyou to Tommie (07841) for figuring this out before hand and the advice.

http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts.do?model=GL63&mospid=47777&btnr=22_0073&hg=22&fg=05


Use a front engine support brace on front of car
Remove Top screw of motor mount
Raise the engine about 4-5 inches. This gives you just enough space to get in and start removing bolts
raise motor mount up and stick something under it to keep it out of the way
Remove 4 torx bolts. I had to put heat on 1 to break the grip. Recommend replacing bolts
push bracket to side
Remove last bolt holding alternator housing
Remove assembly and clean
Replace gasket

wilson009
12-12-2009, 11:15 AM
More alternator Bracket Pics
Replace this Seal. A bad seal here would definitely cause oil dripping/weeping. As there and opening directly into the block.

No clue why its here doesn't' seem to do anything or go anywhere.

07841-tb
12-12-2009, 11:29 AM
Good job Ed.:thumbup::thumbup:

wilson009
12-12-2009, 11:41 AM
Fuel Injector RnR

Since my Fuel Injectors were out I took the opportunity to replace the o-rings. Bad o-rings cause leaking gas and fire. My originals weren't too bad but someone may find this of use at some point.


Remove each injector one at a time and replacing before moving to the next one.
unclip leveling clamp
unclip electrical connections
Pull Straight UP
inspect each injector for damage or clogging
Replace upper and lower o-rings
Make sure housing is clean q-tip
Reinsert injector
Lock clip in with Clamp


Clean Electrical connections with Electric Cleaner and reconnect with electric lubricant sealer

wilson009
12-13-2009, 10:28 AM
Pressure regulator valve replacement

Called Crank Case Vent CCV on as well


Simple replacement

When malfunctioning can allow oil to escape into intake manifold. Causing white smoke.
Members have reported howling noises in engine, rough lean running,hesitation as well. Some years had recalls on this.


Replacement is simple just pop off old ones and snap on new ones in same position. push it down each section till you get 6 clicks.



http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts.do?model=GL63&mospid=47777&btnr=11_3258&hg=11&fg=15 #13

wilson009
12-13-2009, 10:56 AM
Crankshaft Hub removal


After pulling the crankshaft bolt

Attach vibration damper to hub with 2-3 screws. Pull Hub straight out.

Pull out crankshaft seal

wilson009
12-13-2009, 11:07 AM
Lower Timing case removal


Unbolt all timing bolts. Should be 13 but use realoem as reference

Remove 5 bolts connecting oil pan to timing case
then remove 2 more on each side of the oil pan to take pressure off timing cover (0781tb trick)

remove 2 bolts from each side of engine upper block though head gasket to timing cover

see attached pic for bolt locations.

off timing cover from driver side first.

wilson009
12-13-2009, 11:49 AM
tic tic tic tic

OK heres the reason i decided to go through the trouble of removing the lower timing cover.

After i removed the valve covers i noticed the timing chain was shiny on the top.

This is a sign of the chain hitting the block an grooving it. makes a tic tic sound.

Our chains are guided by sliderails which become brittle over time

Sure enough i found grooves on both sides. one rail was cracked. So i will be replacing these rails. See pics for location of grooves and cracks, couldnt get actual pic of grooves due to cams.

http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts.do?model=GL63&mospid=47777&btnr=11_3268&hg=11&fg=25

Blue Bimmer
12-13-2009, 05:57 PM
wilson, how are you doing all of this? How do you know to look for these "extra" things? Are you using the service manual? Can someone tell me how to get it?

Why not just pull the whole engine if you're going that deep? Seems like it would be easier to take it all apart and inspect it?

wilson009
12-13-2009, 06:40 PM
wilson, how are you doing all of this? How do you know to look for these "extra" things? Are you using the service manual? Can someone tell me how to get it?

Why not just pull the whole engine if you're going that deep? Seems like it would be easier to take it all apart and inspect it?

I'm just working out of my garage on weekends and evenings. My kids and wife are suffering but I gotta knock this out. My references are the electronic TIS which is an electronic manual, real oem for breakout of parts, google, and I read all the problems on this board and the solutions and get help from the guys on here.

I had a friend who was a mechanic that taught me about the timing chain.

I'm not going any farther than this so an engine pull wasn't needed I have no idea how to do that anyway.

By studying and documenting everything it helps me learn everything so I can get it all back together. One nice thing about BMW is all of the visual resources.

wilson009
12-16-2009, 09:55 PM
Replacing Driver Side Slide Rails for Timing Chains

--stayed tuned for passenger side, still deep in it.....

When replacing the guide Rails, I noticed BMW offers a kit for this with different part numbers than the originals. This means the product was improved due to issues with the original design guys.....

The new parts are longer and made of more durable metal and material.


Replacing the slides on the Driver wasn't to bad. However BMW has no information on this from what i could find so i went in blind.

Use nail polish to mark your chains to the exact gear notch.
Use zipties to shore put tension on the chain.
Use Clamps and any clamps you have to keep your chains in their original positions.
Loosing the Chain Tensioner Bolt

I replaced the lower slide 1st then the upper slide rail.
Just one or 2 bolts holding each side.
You have to slide the out carefully at the Cylinder Head doesn't give you much room to manipulate the pieces

Both upper and lower slider rails were broken on the tips and the plastic was brittle.
I found more evidence of wear the chain had been hitting the block.

Sliding the new ones in required careful manipulation of consideration of the cylinder head, head gasket and chain.

Last replace the chain tensioner at the top. It has 2 bolts. Lift up the oil spray slightly to removel

Once in tighten your bolts, and chain tensioner.


http://www.realoem.com/bmw/showparts.do?model=GL63&mospid=47777&btnr=11_3268&hg=11&fg=25

Jerry 745Li
12-17-2009, 09:08 AM
Wilson,
Where are you buying the parts from?

Thanks,
Jerry

wilson009
12-17-2009, 02:10 PM
Mostly at the dealership. All the small parts are oem only.some of the parts are shipped from gerrmany. Ive been gettn 20% discount on everthing. No shippng charges either.

Jerry 745Li
12-24-2009, 03:13 PM
Hope you get back to this project after the holidays. This is one thread I enjoy keeping up with.

Jerry

haz1
12-24-2009, 06:39 PM
Awesome project, enjoy the holidays if u can, although I never plan on going this deep, I appreciate learning and viewing the pics, much better than looking at a manual.

wilson009
12-26-2009, 03:25 PM
Yeah I will be starting back up here. Ran into a few issues. I kinked the oil pan gasket when trying to get the timing cover back on. It was just too tight. Had to pull everything thing off and clear off all the silicone. Very frustrating day that was.

I dropped the lower oil pan then removed the screws to lower the upper oil pan so I can now get the lower timing cover on with no issues. Waiting on my friend to come over and help me with the timing first. After that I will start putting it all back together. I'm glad I did this log as its helped me memorize the parts and locations.

In retrospect it probably would be easier to just pull the engine since I got so deep. But I wasn't comfortable with that idea at the time.

wilson009
12-26-2009, 04:11 PM
Timing Rails Passenger side

The timing rails were clearly improved over the older rails in quality and also longer. It also included a new oil spray nozzle that was longer that the previous. However these length differences created all kinds of space issues for me.



This side was just a pain in the rear. I'll try to describe this so it makes sense. But it is just difficult! Unlike the driver side. These the bolts for the slide rails reside between the engine block and the slide rail. So that leaves you about 2 inches of space. Furthermore you will have limited ability to maneuver the rails laterally because they are blocked by the cylinderhead and head gasket that is sticking precariously out.

It almost seems the cylinder head has to be removed to to this procedure or the chains off completely

My solution to this was to break out the old slide rails. When trying to install the new slide rails I had issues with chain tension preventing the rails from being installed as the bolt between the engine was pushing outwards to much that it would have broken chains.

My solution was to cut the bolts leaving a minimum of 5 threads.

This left me just enough space to squeeze the slide rails into posistion and secure the bolts back into the engine using a wrench that I had cut off at the head so I could fit it in there.

I lost the timing during this mess. I have a friend who thinks he can time it. I'll know tomorrow when we give it a go. Otherwise I'll use the timing kit. But the procedure doesn't seem to difficult.

Lost a lot of days on this. But Glad I found it versus having my timing chain explode in the engine 400 miles from home.

wilson009
12-26-2009, 04:46 PM
DCS Valve Block Replacement

I had this diagnosed as bad at the dealership earlier. When turning to the left at a certain speed I would hear at distinctive Pop in the lower engine on the passenger side. This is also where the Valve block is located. After pop the Dynamic Stability Control Error would pop up and shut down DSC. I could reproduce the error anytime I wanted by turning to the left and it would reset itself when I shut off the car.

The part at the dealership is $1000 like everything else.

I got lucky and picked up a new one on ebay for $250.

The valve block is nothing more than a heavy piece of aluminum with passageways for the fluids. The fluids are controlled by solenoids in the block. I guess BMW can't isolate which solenoid is malfunctioning so they just replace the entire thing........

To get to the block

Remove the wheel on the passenger side
Remove the access panel to expose the block
Remove some bolts on the under-body protection to give space to get under.


Removal is fairly straightforward.

Use Crows feet to remove each line.
Problems you may run into are the lines being seized up with Rust and needing to be replaced.

Remove the 2 electrical connections.
remove 2 bolts on the bottom holding the block.

Installation requires some care as as the block is aluminum and you don't want to strip the threads from the steel high pressure lines.

I installed the lines on the top of the block first so I could manipulate the block to line up with the lines. They are at a weird angle so it is very difficult to get the threads lined up correctly.

I broke apart the old block to show the components of the block

wilson009
12-26-2009, 04:56 PM
Pictures of the Lower Timing Cover

For Visual Reference

Keif
12-26-2009, 08:50 PM
Those solenoids look quite similar to the VANOS solenoids. Any indication which part was actually causing the valve block trouble? That first lower timing cover picture gives a great view of the weep hole location. Keep up the good work!

wilson009
12-27-2009, 08:06 AM
Those solenoids look quite similar to the VANOS solenoids. Any indication which part was actually causing the valve block trouble? That first lower timing cover picture gives a great view of the weep hole location. Keep up the good work!


I have no clue which part of the block was causing the malfunction. The only way aside from a bench test, would be to reverse engineer... I'm sure turning to the left was putting pressure on one of the lines and a solenoid was failing to operate correctly. Just not sure which one that would be..... Good technical docs on the block would help that process if they exist other than in the German labs. This is definitely an ebay or junkyard replacement over new....

wilson009
12-29-2009, 09:21 PM
Finally Putting it Back together....

Timing Cover on Last Night and Upper Oil pan and alternator housing tonight.

Slow and tedious but I'm over the hump!

Put in my nonallgerman stock coolant tube and put in extra sealant.

Then moved to the lower timing cover

Timing cover is hard to align with all the metal gaskets and fitting between headgaskets. Its a process I care not to repeat without taking the engine out.

I put sealant around everything. Better safe than sorry.

Put in Crankshaft seal and Bolt

Installed alternator housing with new seal and lil extra sealant :) and installed motor mount arm. Major pain hardly any room to maneuver tools in there!

wilson009
12-29-2009, 09:26 PM
Replacing Stabilizer Bar Rubber Mountings

Unlike the gaskets which got hard. These were soft, and pliable. The new ones were much more firm and held their shape. Should help the Stabilzer Bar which ties into the DSC system.

wilson009
12-29-2009, 09:34 PM
Lift Points on your car

Taking extra pics while I'm under here.
Reference only

There are 6 locations for you to jack up the car 2 primary


The first is the plastic Block directly under the car between the front
2nd is the rear axle dead center

The other 4 are for jacking up a side for a tire change and located just below each of the 4 doors.

wilson009
12-29-2009, 09:44 PM
Taking extra pics while I'm under here.
Reference only

Engine Opening to Alternator Housing Seal
Exhaust Manifold Gaskets
Transmission Pan Drain Location
Exhaust Tubing and Oxygen Sensor locations
Oil Pump pics

Blue Bimmer
12-30-2009, 07:27 AM
I'm just working out of my garage on weekends and evenings. My kids and wife are suffering but I gotta knock this out. My references are the electronic TIS which is an electronic manual, real oem for breakout of parts, google, and I read all the problems on this board and the solutions and get help from the guys on here.

I had a friend who was a mechanic that taught me about the timing chain.

I'm not going any farther than this so an engine pull wasn't needed I have no idea how to do that anyway.

By studying and documenting everything it helps me learn everything so I can get it all back together. One nice thing about BMW is all of the visual resources.

You mentioned pulling the engine if you did this again, so my questions again (kind of) is why not pull the engine? I am by no means a mechanic, but it seems like you just unplug the wires, loosen the motor mounts, take off a few parts like the fan etc, disconnect from the tranny and pull it, right? Obviously the hood would need to come off too i assume. An engine lift would be required.

I have NEVER pulled an engine, but it doesnt seem that hard really, but please feel free to correct me if i'm wrong. I'm thinking in a couple years lots of us will have the same issues and for those of us that like to tinker, it might be easier to just pull everything to gain better access for this involved of a job.

Now, if all the parts you took off would have to be taken off anyway before the engine pull, then the access issue would be moot.

I am completely unaware of how to disconect an engine from a transmission, but i'm guessing the tranny housing just bolts the the engine in a specific way and lines itself up?

Also, you mentioned in one post that if you disconnect one of the engine mounts, you can jack the engine up 5 or 6 inches for access to a certain part, wouldnt this lift the transmission as well? Would you have to loosen transmission mounting brackets or is it floating? If it's floating I assume that due to the guibo in the drive shaft, that may be the flex point?

Thoughts?

hotrod2448
12-30-2009, 09:09 AM
You mentioned pulling the engine if you did this again, so my questions again (kind of) is why not pull the engine? I am by no means a mechanic, but it seems like you just unplug the wires, loosen the motor mounts, take off a few parts like the fan etc, disconnect from the tranny and pull it, right? Obviously the hood would need to come off too i assume. An engine lift would be required.

I have NEVER pulled an engine, but it doesnt seem that hard really, but please feel free to correct me if i'm wrong. I'm thinking in a couple years lots of us will have the same issues and for those of us that like to tinker, it might be easier to just pull everything to gain better access for this involved of a job.

Now, if all the parts you took off would have to be taken off anyway before the engine pull, then the access issue would be moot.

I am completely unaware of how to disconect an engine from a transmission, but i'm guessing the tranny housing just bolts the the engine in a specific way and lines itself up?

Also, you mentioned in one post that if you disconnect one of the engine mounts, you can jack the engine up 5 or 6 inches for access to a certain part, wouldnt this lift the transmission as well? Would you have to loosen transmission mounting brackets or is it floating? If it's floating I assume that due to the guibo in the drive shaft, that may be the flex point?

Thoughts?

It depends really. At most factories these days the engine is installed from below. I'm fairly certain they still provide some type of accommodation to remove the engine from above though. You'd remove the trans at the bell housing most likely. I don't believe most production cars have enough room to remove the trans with the engine.

Personally if I had to do this I would just remove the engine because even though most/all the same parts are going to need to come off to do the job at least you have easy access to them when the engine is sitting on a stand. Truth be told if I was going that far that I'd either get rid of the car or do a complete engine rebuild while it's out but, that's just me.

wilson009
12-30-2009, 11:45 AM
Whether you pull the engine is a comfort level really. If your comfortable with it and have the tools do it. There are 2 connectons on the engine, front driver side, rear passenger side. Attached a chain to those to loops of a disconnected engine and it will pull right up.
There will be a few more connections to remove such as the exhaust pipes etc and who know what else..

Do just do the all German Auto pipe, its just a fraction of the work i did.


To do it even cheaper do it the way Tommie B did by lifting up the side. This worked well for me until I ran into the Timing Chain issues, but by then I was already in deep. This is all a new learning process for all of us and can no doubt be improved by the next guy. I didn't have to do anything with the Tranny bolts.

I'm not a mechanic. I work in IT lol. I'm doing what I have to do and learning and correcting as i go. I have had limited experience with cars in the past (oil, belts, pans) but this has greatly increased my knowledge. So if I had the same knowledge I had right now, at the beginning of this project I probably would have pulled the engine.



You mentioned pulling the engine if you did this again, so my questions again (kind of) is why not pull the engine? I am by no means a mechanic, but it seems like you just unplug the wires, loosen the motor mounts, take off a few parts like the fan etc, disconnect from the tranny and pull it, right? Obviously the hood would need to come off too i assume. An engine lift would be required.

I have NEVER pulled an engine, but it doesnt seem that hard really, but please feel free to correct me if i'm wrong. I'm thinking in a couple years lots of us will have the same issues and for those of us that like to tinker, it might be easier to just pull everything to gain better access for this involved of a job.

Now, if all the parts you took off would have to be taken off anyway before the engine pull, then the access issue would be moot.

I am completely unaware of how to disconect an engine from a transmission, but i'm guessing the tranny housing just bolts the the engine in a specific way and lines itself up?

Also, you mentioned in one post that if you disconnect one of the engine mounts, you can jack the engine up 5 or 6 inches for access to a certain part, wouldnt this lift the transmission as well? Would you have to loosen transmission mounting brackets or is it floating? If it's floating I assume that due to the guibo in the drive shaft, that may be the flex point?

Thoughts?

hotrod2448
12-30-2009, 01:37 PM
Whether you pull the engine is a comfort level really. If your comfortable with it and have the tools do it. There are 2 connectons on the engine, front driver side, rear passenger side. Attached a chain to those to loops of a disconnected engine and it will pull right up.
There will be a few more connections to remove such as the exhaust pipes etc and who know what else..

Do just do the all German Auto pipe, its just a fraction of the work i did.


To do it even cheaper do it the way Tommie B did by lifting up the side. This worked well for me until I ran into the Timing Chain issues, but by then I was already in deep. This is all a new learning process for all of us and can no doubt be improved by the next guy. I didn't have to do anything with the Tranny bolts.

I'm not a mechanic. I work in IT lol. I'm doing what I have to do and learning and correcting as i go. I have had limited experience with cars in the past (oil, belts, pans) but this has greatly increased my knowledge. So if I had the same knowledge I had right now, at the beginning of this project I probably would have pulled the engine.

Good way to state it.

Blue Bimmer
12-30-2009, 02:09 PM
Hopefully my post didnt sound rude- I applaud your efforts and appreciate you sharing your experience. I am thinking though if I were to do the coolant pipe myself, i'd probably have the same mentality as you and figure that since i'm already wrist deep, might as well go elbow deep and do some preventative maintenance- plus it would be a project.

Anyway- thanks for all the info.


Whether you pull the engine is a comfort level really. If your comfortable with it and have the tools do it. There are 2 connectons on the engine, front driver side, rear passenger side. Attached a chain to those to loops of a disconnected engine and it will pull right up.
There will be a few more connections to remove such as the exhaust pipes etc and who know what else..

Do just do the all German Auto pipe, its just a fraction of the work i did.


To do it even cheaper do it the way Tommie B did by lifting up the side. This worked well for me until I ran into the Timing Chain issues, but by then I was already in deep. This is all a new learning process for all of us and can no doubt be improved by the next guy. I didn't have to do anything with the Tranny bolts.

I'm not a mechanic. I work in IT lol. I'm doing what I have to do and learning and correcting as i go. I have had limited experience with cars in the past (oil, belts, pans) but this has greatly increased my knowledge. So if I had the same knowledge I had right now, at the beginning of this project I probably would have pulled the engine.

wilson009
12-30-2009, 05:26 PM
No not at all. Its all good!


Hopefully my post didnt sound rude- I applaud your efforts and appreciate you sharing your experience. I am thinking though if I were to do the coolant pipe myself, i'd probably have the same mentality as you and figure that since i'm already wrist deep, might as well go elbow deep and do some preventative maintenance- plus it would be a project.

Anyway- thanks for all the info.

wilson009
01-04-2010, 07:44 PM
TIMING PROCEDURES

Get the timing tools. They are sooo worth it. 11 9 460 ebay

1. Put Engine at Top Dead Center TDC on Cylinder #1.
a. Cylinder 1 is the front Piston on Passenger Side
b. Start the timing procedures on The Drivers Side..
c. Secure vibration damper with special tool 11 9 190 in firing TDC position of 1st cylinder.
2. Slacken screws of exhaust and inlet adjustment unit. Turn to the left to loosen.
a. When slackening screws, grip camshafts at hexagon head behind inlet units with wrench. See pic.
3. Place special tool 11 9 461 on inlet camshaft and align inlet. The cams move free of the chain when loosened.
4. Adjust camshaft so that special tool 11 9 461 rests without a gap on cylinder head.
5. Fit special tool 11 9 463 , secure screw (1) in thread for oil line and tighten down by hand.
6. Tightening down screw to inlet while gripping camshaft at hexagon head.
7. Place special tool 11 9 462 on exhaust camshaft and align exhaust camshaft so that special tool 11 9 462 rests without a gap on cylinder head.
8. Fit special tool 11 9 463 , secure screw (1) in thread for oil line and tighten down by hand.
9. Tightening down screw to exhaust while gripping camshaft at hexagon head.

Check Timing on Passenger Side
Repeat Procedure if needed

Once everything is aligned Crank engine at central bolt twice in direction of rotation until
engine returns to firing TDC position of 1st cylinder. Check your timing again. If it is off adjust again. Slack in the chain may throw off timing. Repeat procedure to adjust cams again if needed.

Jerry 745Li
01-05-2010, 02:07 PM
So, is it put back together? I'm dying to know if it starts up and runs fine the first time.

Jer

teejaylentz
01-05-2010, 05:43 PM
+1 - very curious to hear the results!

haz1
01-05-2010, 09:49 PM
No not at all. Its all good!

Keep it rolling Wilson, quite extensive project and details are exemplary, learning a lot.

Keif
01-06-2010, 07:29 AM
+1. Mighty glad to have timing instructions posted somewhere and have access to someone who has done it! ...and glad to have material for people to fight the dealers with when they say it's a nightmare to do the timing on these! Great job man, and thanks for posting all these pictures/procedures.

Jerry 745Li
01-06-2010, 08:32 AM
I know it would be a lot to ask, but would help others, could you tally the parts and costs in an itemized list as well as your estimated time spent doing the work? I know you said you were an IT guy and did this project not having any real experience, so I applaud you for that. So, if I were drive out to Ohio, what's your labor charge? :-)

Jer

07841-tb
01-06-2010, 08:39 AM
+1. Mighty glad to have timing instructions posted somewhere and have access to someone who has done it! ...and glad to have material for people to fight the dealers with when they say it's a nightmare to do the timing on these! Great job man, and thanks for posting all these pictures/procedures.

+1:thumbup:

GKT33
01-06-2010, 11:28 AM
+1:)!! One of the best post's I've seen since I have been a member of this forum!

wilson009
01-07-2010, 06:29 AM
Don't worry i'll post the results and figure out the costs when I'm done.

I don't have it together yet. I only have a few hours each night or less depending on kid demands and my wifey. My heater broke and its 23 degrees right now so i'm didn't get much done this week.

And yes i"m too am worried when i first start it up. I'm sure I'll get some errors from various sensors. But I know I got all my seals right and torque settings done and timing right. Will probably do the Valve Covers this weekend, will need my patience for that one according to Keif lol.

I expect that after I get it running i will need to tightenup or replace one of my DSC lines which is siezed with rust and a few minor things that i may miss. So hopefully i'll be fully operational within a week (barring unforseen circumstances).

Keif
01-07-2010, 08:20 AM
(and beer and maybe earplugs so the kids don't hear the cussing) ...it's not tough, just a pain.

wilson009
01-11-2010, 01:57 PM
Well I should have had it done this weekend but I made my first big mistake.

Putting on the Valve Cover on the driverside I read the wrong Torque setting for the bolts to the Timing Cover. I think I must have put in the torque for the cylinderhead to the block.

Anyway I always have a hard time trusting torque wrenches especially at the lower settings. I was spinning it in and wondering why it hadn't clicked. The it just snapped off. :mad:
Stupid mistake after so much tedious work.

The aluminum is so soft I destroyed the timing cover trying to back out the bolt.

Thankfully realoem makes it so easy to order parts. I'll have a replacement by Wednesday.

Meanwhile I put on the Passenger side valve Cover as well as pretty much the rest of the parts. I'll write that up later. So close.

hotrod2448
01-11-2010, 03:21 PM
Well I should have had it done this weekend but I made my first big mistake.

Putting on the Valve Cover on the driverside I read the wrong Torque setting for the bolts to the Timing Cover. I think I must have put in the torque for the cylinderhead to the block.

Anyway I always have a hard time trusting torque wrenches especially at the lower settings. I was spinning it in and wondering why it hadn't clicked. The it just snapped off. :mad:
Stupid mistake after so much tedious work.

The aluminum is so soft I destroyed the timing cover trying to back out the bolt.

Thankfully realoem makes it so easy to order parts. I'll have a replacement by Wednesday.

Meanwhile I put on the Passenger side valve Cover as well as pretty much the rest of the parts. I'll write that up later. So close.

Is it in a location where you will be able to heli-coil the damaged threads?

wilson009
01-11-2010, 05:57 PM
It would have been if I could have successfully removed the bolt. But its just a big gaping hole now too big to heli-coil back to 10mm. The timing case cover was $80 so not too big of a mistake.

Judd944
01-18-2010, 07:53 AM
how is it going?

wilson009
01-25-2010, 05:38 AM
Everything is together. No leaks.

However I"m dealing with a misfire on cylinder 1. I'll make a separate post on that as I need help. Then I'll finish up this post.

wilson009
02-08-2010, 06:48 PM
Re-installing the Valve Covers


Replace the 4 Valve Cover bolts. They are weak and can snap after previous use.

Put the spark plug tubes in. They should fit snug in the hole by the plugs. If they are loose at all they should be replaced as they will leak oil into your plug.

Use an OEM Gasket replacement to get the right fit. Apply a thin bead of "The Right Stuff" gasket maker or whatever you use to the top of the gasket and place in the valve cover then seat the gasket. Apply another layer to the bottom of the gasket. (BMW just does the corners. I did the whole thing)


Quickly work it on. The hard part is getting it over that cam shaft sensor. I highly reccommend doing a dry run a 1 or two times to get the procedure down. Once on align the cover holes with the smark plug tubes. Make sure everything is clear then use a rubber mallet to tamp it down till the tubes are snug against the cover.



Snug the bolts by hand then torqued the bolts.



Repeat the other side.


Put the rest of the car back together. If you got this far the putting back together is easy.

Unless you replaced a module there is no reprogramming by the dealership needed. The engine will re-adapt.

And Your all Done!

wilson009
02-08-2010, 06:53 PM
Your all done unless your a dumba$$ me that is....

Then you will unwittingly drop a plastic piece into the head which will cause exhaust valve #2 to jam.

So Part II of my project will be pulling the passenger side cylinder valve. Here we go again!

teejaylentz
03-08-2010, 07:06 PM
Just re-read this thread again as a reference - getting ready to change my valve cover gaskets and upper timing chain cover gaskets soon...

Wilson - is your car up and running now?

oifoef0809
03-09-2010, 06:07 AM
I have a 2002 745i and really enjoyed this write up! I am a former BMW tech about 10 years ago, and really liked this write up. I plan on doing most of the work on my 7 myself aside from the electronic programing since I dont have the factory computer at home, lol. Good job!

wilson009
03-15-2010, 07:00 AM
Well it would have been ready to go. But I discovered the source of my misfires was bent exhaust valves on cylinder 1&2.

I did this manually before I had my timing kit.

After finally figuring this out.... I pulled the head and ordered new valves and sent to the machine shop.

I should will be getting it back today. Over all it was about a $350 mistake. (not including time, but this project is all about patience and perseverance and a great education....)

Head gasket, Bolts, and valves were about $250 plus another $100 at the machine shop.

I'll update here once I get it back together, but I've been taking pictures.

So basically I know how to change an head gasket on a 745 now and it isn't very fun!

fyi- I considered pulling both heads and doing a complete valve job, but the heads were very clean and the amount of money I would need to invest (time and money) wasn't practical for any percieved benefit..

wilson009
03-31-2010, 05:51 PM
BMW Engine is together and Running!

wilson009
03-31-2010, 06:17 PM
Cylinder Head Removal

To Remove a Cylinder head you better be familiar with your engine. And its every bit as difficult to remove as BMW likes to do with its other stuff.

1. Remove the Valve Covers and all the stuff in the front.
2. Exhaust Manifold.
a. To Remove the Exhaust manifold you have to drop the front axle support. Why? Its the only way to get the clearance you need to get at the exhaust.
b. This means you need to lift the engine with a engine puller to support it.

See Keifers DIY on dropping the front axle support.

Its not that hard and I did the entire job by myself. The axle is light and can be lifted/pressed on and off. But a jack of a friend would definitely make it easier.

3 Once the exhaust if off you have to bolt the axle back on.
4 Lower the engine back onto the axle support so the engine puller can be removed.
5. Remove the EGR valve
6. Drain the antifreeze from the block from the drain bolt underneath the exhaust manifold
7 Unbolt the head bolts. Pitch them or save for something else but do not reuse.
8. Lift of the head.
9. If antifreeze spills out you will need to flush out your oil system.

wilson009
03-31-2010, 06:32 PM
Here are pics of the Cylinder Head Removed and the Piston heads

wilson009
03-31-2010, 06:36 PM
Pics of my Bent Valves

Took the Head and the new valves to a machine shop and had them refitted for $40. The best value of the whole project.

wilson009
03-31-2010, 06:42 PM
Pics of the Springs, Roller Levers, Valve Collet, and Hydraulic Valve Push Rod

wilson009
03-31-2010, 06:46 PM
The Intermediate Levers are on the Intake Valve Side only.

They are used by the Eccentric shaft/actuator to set adjust your inlet camshaft/valves.

wilson009
03-31-2010, 06:53 PM
Once your ready to go its just a matter of doing everything in reverse order.

Getting the new head gasket on and easy. Just put torque down your headbolts in the correct order. See Pic.

wilson009
03-31-2010, 06:57 PM
Understanding BMW Timing.

I made this document based on what I learned and the TIS and from my Friend Keith and some good ole Reverse Engineering backed up by verifying it works.

If you can understand this document you can time a BMW.

See Attachment

johndade
03-31-2010, 07:58 PM
So hows it running after this huge project? Your 7 should be running as good as the day it came off the line. Good job on the diy.

wilson009
03-31-2010, 08:15 PM
Well the parts I touched run great. But it is a 7 so Ill still be on here.... Tacking a transmisson problem next.

So hows it running after this huge project? Your 7 should be running as good as the day it came off the line. Good job on the diy.

Seven11
03-31-2010, 08:32 PM
wow bent valves!

do u know why it happened?

Keif
03-31-2010, 09:29 PM
For reference, making some long dowels to thread in place of the middle two bolts of the front axle support makes raising / lowering it much, much easier.

When trying to understand the timing, read Wilson's document thoroughly, and keep in mind that the intake cam lobes actually contact the intermediate levers at a 45 degree angle (southeast on bank 1 / passenger's side, southwest on bank 2 / driver's side), and those intermediate levers in turn contact the rockers. This is important because the intake cams will look like they are 90 degrees off from each other...until you take the contact positions of the intermediate levers with the intake cams into account, then it should all make sense.

wilson009
04-01-2010, 03:34 AM
Yeah... Going way back. When I replaced my sliderails the exhaust cam on the pass side slipped more than I realized. This was before I understood the timing. I rotated the engine 1x bendn the valves . I then timed the engine not knowing I had already bent the valves.


wow bent valves!

do u know why it happened?

serge254
04-01-2010, 11:31 AM
Hey Wilson were do you get yous TIS? Can you give me website. I search online can't found.:)
Here is my post http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=442315&highlight=

Keif
04-01-2010, 12:00 PM
BMWTIS.com / BMWTechInfo.com (~$30/day), eBay, or one of the many file sharing networks

teejaylentz
04-01-2010, 11:08 PM
Glad to see this project come to completion. The pictures and documentation along the way are amazing and are an awesome contribution to this community for anyone that needs to take this journey again!

intsu
05-09-2010, 08:57 AM
I was gonna change my valve cover gaskets and stumbled on this thread. I have oil in the plugs and idling is not so great. Also got the tic tic noise. Great information here! Thanks to Wilson for taking time to document all this and thanks to other contributors too!


A question: What is the part number of the bolts in the valve cover? The ones Wilson recommended to replace?

Here's the list of the parts I compiled from this and other threads. If you guys have some suggestions to add, change or subtract from the list they are more than welcome.

Edit: REALOEM.com links are not working in the pdf, sorry :(

bmw74me
05-29-2010, 09:44 AM
wow great job wilson...man i give you a tun of credit .....

CirrusSR22
09-25-2010, 11:55 PM
I'm getting ready to replace the coolant pipe with the All German Auto unit and it mentions removing the intake cam adjusters. I've read in another thread people questioning why they sell new gaskets for those, which suggests they don't need to be removed. Also, the pictures in this thread make it look like you can remove the intake manifold without removing the adjusters.

Do the adjusters need to be removed to pull the intake manifold and valley pan to access the long pipe? If so, can they just be bolted back in, or do they require a timing procedure/special tools?

Thanks :)

wilson009
09-27-2010, 03:15 AM
No you do not need to mess with the adjusters. Just pull the intake manifold . The adjusters and timing was to pull the head to fix a bent valve .

Sent from my PC36100 using BimmerApp

CirrusSR22
09-27-2010, 08:26 PM
Ok, I got the engine apart (harness, injectors, intake mani., valley pan, etc.) and yes the adjuster didn't need to be touched. Thanks! But now, once everything was apart, I decided that the valve cover gaskets should be done as well, so the ajusters do need to come out. :)

wilson009
11-20-2010, 01:17 PM
I think we might be using different definitions for adjusters as the ones I was referring to are underneath the valve cover. I hope your project went well.

Ok, I got the engine apart (harness, injectors, intake mani., valley pan, etc.) and yes the adjuster didn't need to be touched. Thanks! But now, once everything was apart, I decided that the valve cover gaskets should be done as well, so the ajusters do need to come out. :)



Sent from my PC36100 using BimmerApp

Xerox
02-26-2011, 07:07 AM
So I have pulled the covers off and I am in the process of putting them back on. I am having a very difficult time getting them to go onto the new spark plug tubes. I tried with the old spark plug tubes and the covers go on very easy. Any ideas? Both sides are having problems getting back on. Any tricks to getting them back on?

Thanks

intsu
02-27-2011, 02:40 AM
So I have pulled the covers off and I am in the process of putting them back on. I am having a very difficult time getting them to go onto the new spark plug tubes. I tried with the old spark plug tubes and the covers go on very easy. Any ideas? Both sides are having problems getting back on. Any tricks to getting them back on?

Thanks

Did you use lubricant? I used generous amount of lubricant on spark plug tube ends. They went in with no resistance at all.

Xerox
02-27-2011, 03:58 AM
What did you use as a lubricant?

intsu
02-27-2011, 05:47 AM
I think it was some silicone based lubricant. I had few unlabeled lubricant bottles on the shelf. I picked the one that eliminated friction best. If i remember correctly the TIS specified lubricant is also silicone based.

Xerox
02-27-2011, 06:19 AM
Yeah, my version of the TIS just said "Anti friction rubber coating". I was not sure what and could not find anything that said that. So I figured it meant a lubricant and just put a small amount of oil on the tube seal. However, I had no luck with it. The old ones did not even need oil on them, the just slid right in. Do you think oil is fine, or should I look for something else? Maybe I should put oil on both the tube and the valve cover.

Thanks

intsu
02-27-2011, 09:25 AM
I would get some lubricant that is designed for this. I tried with different oils and if you use something like wd40 or general lubricants its about same as not using any. At least when i compared "general purpose" lubricants and silicone based lubricants the different was like night and day. I used silicone oil that was quite thick and clear, much like a syrup. Its used to treat rubber seals in industry, but is very multipurpose stuff. I used small paintbrush to apply it.

Xerox
02-27-2011, 08:42 PM
I found Silicone grease at Home Depot in the plumbing section used for o-rings in faucets. You are right it was like night and day. The cover slides right on. However, now I am on to my next challenge in that it seems that I can not get the tubes to go all the way up into the cover. It has a very small gap at the top. This small gap seems to be keeping me from putting the small nuts/bolts back onto the bottom of the cover. I am not having a problem getting the long ones on the top. Just for reference, I tried the long ones on bottom to see if I could get those started and I could. I would guess I have about an 1/8 of an inch gap from the top of the cover to the top of the tube.

I am sure this gap is not suppose to be there but can not figure out what to do about it. Any ideas?

Thanks for your help with the grease!

intsu
02-28-2011, 04:27 AM
I also had hard time getting covers back on. Mostly because I was too lazy to read tis and didn't notice I had different size bolts. Are you tightening them in right order? Does your new spark plug tubes have a metal sleeve on them? Mine did and I ended taking them off to get cover aligned properly&threads started.

Xerox
02-28-2011, 05:00 AM
So I do have the new tubes with the aluminum covers. I did read tis thats the only reason I knew the 4 small bolts went on the bottom. I have not taken the aluminum off but might have to as a last resort. Do you feel the aluminum sleeves is what made the difference for you?

Thanks

intsu
02-28-2011, 06:30 AM
Maybe do a dry run without them? See if it helps. Sleeves seem to keep tubes straight when seated on the head. I failed to see any obvious other uses for them. Plus old tubes didn't have them. So I just took them off as it allowed more movement with the cover. After I realized I had different size bolts it went without bigger issues. I still had to lean a bit over it to get threads started as new rubber grommets/sealing elements were little bit thicker than old ones.

Xerox
02-28-2011, 07:03 AM
I'll let you know what I find. Thanks for the help.

wilson009
02-28-2011, 07:08 PM
The steel tubes won't have an impact. Definately do a dry run. It's a matter of finesse and a rubber mallet when everything is aligned. The putting on the bolts which requires pressure on the cover. Getting the short ones on in the front and working your way back is key if I remember correctly

Sent from my PC36100 using Bimmer A

Xerox
03-02-2011, 05:53 PM
I've got one on. NOW, I have the problem of I can't figure out how the heck to get my torque wrench on the bottom bolts. I've tried a crows foot but still can get in there. Any suggestions? How did you guys do it? I have been successful at getting the wrench on there but then I don't have room to rotate it at all.

The way that I did was as follows:

Call the lower studs from left to right 1-4 (direction doesn't really matter right to left would be fine as well). I put a slightly tightened long bolt on studs 1 & 3 until I could get a short bolt on studs 2 & 4. Removed long bolt attached to stud 1 and replaced with a short bolt. Removed long bolt on stud 3 and replaced with a short bolt. You may have to tighten the bolts slightly more to get the last short bolt on. Once I had all of the short bolts on then I put all the long bolts on.

I did not have to remove the aluminum sleeves. Everything fit together well with them on there.

Thanks

Xerox
03-05-2011, 07:47 AM
No suggestions? I thought somebody would have had a solution. I am waiting for someone to chime in with a winning suggestion:)

Thanks

wilson009
03-07-2011, 06:19 AM
I accomplished this using 2 universal joints (one by ratchet and one by socket) and an extension bar.


I think i also used a stubby ratchet for the 3rd one back.

A flexhead ratchet also came in handy.

I definitely increased my tools selection on this project.

'NOW, I have the problem of I can't figure out how the heck to get my torque wrench on the bottom bolts'

Xerox
03-23-2011, 12:22 PM
More alternator Bracket Pics
Replace this Seal. A bad seal here would definitely cause oil dripping/weeping. As there and opening directly into the block.

No clue why its here doesn't' seem to do anything or go anywhere.

So I am 95% sure I have a leak from here. How difficult is this compared to the valve cover gaskets? It seems like the biggest deal is that the engine has to be hoisted up (which I don't have an engine hoist). I do have a car lift. Is it possible to do without hoisting the engine?

Also my alternator is not water cooled. Does that make a difference? Seems like it would not matter.


Also, I have not been able to find anything in TIS about this subject. Any ideas where it is in TIS. Surely it is in there and I just have not found it. I found how to change he alternator just not the procedure for removing the mounting plat and replacing the gasket .

TIA

xBMW91x
04-08-2011, 01:12 AM
Hello everyone,

I apologize for not starting a different thread for this question but I figured I may just post it here as it's all related.

So I put on my valve covers and after letting the car run for a few minutes I saw some smoke coming out from the area around where the exhaust is, right below the cover. It's not coming out from UNDER the cover itself, just the general area. Could it be the leftover oil that dripped down as I was taking the old covers off? I know for a fact that the new cover is not leaking any oil. Did anybody encounter the same problem? I was thinking of just letting the engine run till it burns off but figured I'd ask before I go with that idea.

mustoboy
11-18-2011, 06:20 PM
GREAT WILSON,
THANK YOU SO MUCH , YOU MADE MY WEEKEND WONDERFULL, LOOKING FOWARD TO FINISH THIS ,
Happy Thanksgiving
mustoboy

Garland745Li
04-19-2012, 06:31 PM
Wilson, you the man. I enjoyed this thread as my Alternator Bracket Gasket is now leaking and I was searching on how to do it, looks like I'm gonna have to hoist the engine up for that pesky last bolt on the bracket to get the bracket to come off. I just don't understand why BMW would put a hole in the engine that serves no purpose. Anyway, thanks for your instructions and for others input as well.

dablk1
06-18-2012, 11:34 AM
Need a little help guys. I am presently fixing my coolant pipe issue. Everything was going well until I was trying to remove the fuel rail. The screws are loose and I gave it a few tugs but it won't budge. I don't want to break anything. Any tips?

Keif
06-18-2012, 08:55 PM
Need a little help guys. I am presently fixing my coolant pipe issue. Everything was going well until I was trying to remove the fuel rail. The screws are loose and I gave it a few tugs but it won't budge. I don't want to break anything. Any tips?
Keep constant pressure pulling straight up and just wiggle a little / gently side to side. It'll come out, just keep at it.

Sent from my ADR6425LVW using Bimmer App

Keif
06-18-2012, 08:59 PM
Wilson, you the man. I enjoyed this thread as my Alternator Bracket Gasket is now leaking and I was searching on how to do it, looks like I'm gonna have to hoist the engine up for that pesky last bolt on the bracket to get the bracket to come off. I just don't understand why BMW would put a hole in the engine that serves no purpose. Anyway, thanks for your instructions and for others input as well.
Use an engine support bar if you have one -- that way the engine stays suspended as you lift and lower the car, as opposed to an engine hoist, which you would have to lift and lower as you lift and lower the car.

Actually that hole at the alternator mounting bracket gasket is used on the gulf versions -- to help in cooling the alternator, I believe.

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dablk1
06-26-2012, 08:11 PM
Well I replaced my coolant pipe. Reassembled everything and now I'm getting a misfire and sounds like it sucking in air on the side of the intake. I will pull some codes and report back. I'm not sure where I went wrong.

Blackbox760
06-28-2012, 08:29 AM
I am also busy to work towards replacing the water pipe inside the V. Start to strip the parts today and I must admit it is much more work than what I thought..;)

At this stage I have removed the fuel rails and the two intake manifolds, I am left to remove all the wiring to get access to the valley pan cover.

While I am inside I am inspecting all the parts for damage and can already see that most of the plastic tubing around the wires are brittle due to heat, I will use BMW cloth tape to repair all the wire looms accessible.

A quick question, is it worth while to remove all the injectors, well first of all is it necessary to remove the injectors? and then is it worth while to have the injectors service at a Bosch dealer? Car has almost 100k miles on the clock now.

What else deserve attention while I have the intake manifold and air box removed?

Cheers

dablk1
06-29-2012, 05:12 PM
I am also busy to work towards replacing the water pipe inside the V. Start to strip the parts today and I must admit it is much more work than what I thought..;)

At this stage I have removed the fuel rails and the two intake manifolds, I am left to remove all the wiring to get access to the valley pan cover.

While I am inside I am inspecting all the parts for damage and can already see that most of the plastic tubing around the wires are brittle due to heat, I will use BMW cloth tape to repair all the wire looms accessible.

A quick question, is it worth while to remove all the injectors, well first of all is it necessary to remove the injectors? and then is it worth while to have the injectors service at a Bosch dealer? Car has almost 100k miles on the clock now.

What else deserve attention while I have the intake manifold and air box removed?

Cheers

That's pretty weird; I had to remove my wires before I removed my fuel raisl. 2 intake manifolds(I only had one unless you are referring to the gaskets) I didn't remove my injectors as it didn't seem neccessary to me, but I did replace my injector o-rings.
I completed mine 2 days ago. I was getting misfires on 3 cylinders until I did.

dablk1
06-29-2012, 05:16 PM
As of right now, the problem has returned. My engine still overheats with coolant loss, but I haven't noticed any leaks whatsoever. I've replaced everything except the waterpump.

Keif
06-29-2012, 09:45 PM
Any water in your oil?

Sent from my ADR6425LVW using Bimmer App

Blackbox760
06-30-2012, 12:17 AM
thanx, I do not know if the V12 has less space inside the V than the V8 but it is very tight in there, I will strip the valley cover off today, I spend half a day yesterday to remove the 12 injectors, two were stuck like anything, I was so glad that the second injector I tried to lift out came out very easy otherwise I would not have known how to get them out. In the end I just took my time, spray a lot of Q20 oil and left the oil to soak in, then I rotated the stuck injector sprayed again, waited again until I could them all out. I will definitely replace the o-rings as well.

I am in the same boat than you, I can not see were my water is disappearing as well, hence my reason to work towards replacing the water pipe inside the V. The previous owner has replaced all the radiator water pipes as well as the complete radiator to try and solve the water issue. I am hoping to find something definite else I will have to look at the alternator o-ring next.

dablk1
06-30-2012, 06:08 AM
Any water in your oil?

Sent from my ADR6425LVW using Bimmer App

No and I changed the oil yesterday.

dablk1
07-03-2012, 03:33 PM
Well I did th "coolant pipe" project and my problem returned 2 days later, so I'm pulling the intake again.

Garland745Li
07-07-2012, 02:06 AM
Hey guys got a couple of questions on the coolant pipe repair. I have a puddle of constant flowing green antifreeze coming from the weep hole(class III Leak) and I looked all over the engine for any other areas of leakage. I know it's the coolant pipe because it just started when the weather got hot as hell here in Dallas to just start to drip out a little. It's over 100 degree + days, and the engine taking on all that extra heat probably just disintegrated that cheap seal in the front on the pipe.

Gonna get my kit from bmwpipe.com, waiting on the mail, and wanted to know when I remove the intake manifold is there a gasket under there that needs to be replaced when you go to put it back together to not cause any air leaks? And is there a torque specification when tightening up those 10 nuts?

I use to be a mechanic in the military so I know I can do it in a couple of days because I won't be in a rush. That's all I can think of for now and know I will probably have more along the way but hopefully not too many because Wilson did a hell of job documenting his journey to the dark side, lol.

BUGMAN1
10-04-2012, 07:20 AM
HELLO, i have been reading the post about this weep hole repair, i keep seeing the reference to the all german pipe,

two things where can i get one and also have anyone heard of the bimmerpipe? any opinion there thanks

mumbe
10-17-2012, 05:29 PM
I have the rt side loose but I do not seem to have enough room with the break lines and ac line how do I free up more room? I managed through the rt side valve cover, timing cover and alt bracket. Not fun but didn't rush.

fratan
02-24-2013, 11:54 AM
I've had a coolant leak for several months now and since I was going on vacation for a week I decided to drop my 2006 750I with 116,000 miles off to my Indy shop. My Indy mechanic is my 28 year old son who has been taking apart cars since he was a kid. A real prodigy.

The first step was to pull the exhaust and drop the tranny to get to the coolant cover by the block. He had access to see if it was leaking but it wasn't but we decided to replaced it anyways since he was there and I had the part.
The second fix was to put the tranny on the stand and to inspect the GUIBO joint. It was shot. He couldn't believe that I could still drive the car. This wear and tear caused a load bang when downshifting, especially between 2nd and first gears.
The third fix was to take the intake apart and get to the valley pan gasket. Sure enough, that was where my coolant leak was. Here is the fix that he did without having to buy the $450.00 tube kit.
He bought a new tube since the dealer doesn't sell the o-ring separate, He took the o-ring off the front part of the tube. He cut under the adhesive to remove the o-ring from the tube since it was glued on. He then inserted the pipe from the rear of the valley pan, instead of the front. He used a windshield adhesive to glue the o-ring back to the front part of the tube and let the adhesive set over night. He also used the same adhesive to put the valley pan cover back on. Next day, put the intake back on, exhaust, and tranny back in the car and finally I have the ultimate driving machine with no smell of coolant or no more fast jerking downshifting.:thumbup:

TamaToa916
04-28-2013, 09:42 PM
I've had a coolant leak for several months now and since I was going on vacation for a week I decided to drop my 2006 750I with 116,000 miles off to my Indy shop. My Indy mechanic is my 28 year old son who has been taking apart cars since he was a kid. A real prodigy.

The first step was to pull the exhaust and drop the tranny to get to the coolant cover by the block. He had access to see if it was leaking but it wasn't but we decided to replaced it anyways since he was there and I had the part.
The second fix was to put the tranny on the stand and to inspect the GUIBO joint. It was shot. He couldn't believe that I could still drive the car. This wear and tear caused a load bang when downshifting, especially between 2nd and first gears.
The third fix was to take the intake apart and get to the valley pan gasket. Sure enough, that was where my coolant leak was. Here is the fix that he did without having to buy the $450.00 tube kit.
He bought a new tube since the dealer doesn't sell the o-ring separate, He took the o-ring off the front part of the tube. He cut under the adhesive to remove the o-ring from the tube since it was glued on. He then inserted the pipe from the rear of the valley pan, instead of the front. He used a windshield adhesive to glue the o-ring back to the front part of the tube and let the adhesive set over night. He also used the same adhesive to put the valley pan cover back on. Next day, put the intake back on, exhaust, and tranny back in the car and finally I have the ultimate driving machine with no smell of coolant or no more fast jerking downshifting.:thumbup:
Can you explain further or aves pix? This sounds very interesting about his fix...if no pix maybe a drawing?:dunno:

fratan
04-29-2013, 11:19 AM
Can't take any pictures now that the valleypan is back in and put back together. My son is an amazing mechanic, 28 years old, gifted. He fixed my wifes 745i this weekend by replacing the bridge seal adapter inside the tranny. I called the distributor for ZF transmissions and he said that 99% of the time the bridge seals crack and needs to be replaced. We were getting the 507c, 507b, 4F97 codes in Inpa. After fixing the bridge seal the codes cleared themselves. Car has a lot more power because the crack adapter seal is a pressure loss causing all kinds of codes.

Getting back to the coolant fix, he bought the valley pan tube from the dealer and at the end it had an o-ring. Instead of coming in from the front of the car and taking apart all that crap he had access to the back of the engine block because the exhaust and tranny was taken off to fix the coolant cover on the back of the engine. That cover wasn't leaking but we replaced it anyways. He cut the o-ring off the tube and was able to install the tube from the rear of the engine block and then glued the o-ring back on with windshield adhesive. Then made the valley pan seal with the same stuff. I've been running the car now for a couple months and not a drop is leaking.
All I have left to do is head gasket and tranny change with new bridge seal.:thumbup:

TamaToa916
04-29-2013, 08:36 PM
Got it ...you're a blessed man:thumbup:

schpenxel
10-04-2013, 01:03 PM
Subscribed--I have been looking for this thread for weeks now--I kept thinking Keif had made it, sorry Wilson!

One note: to pull the head, you do NOT need to unbolt the exhaust manifold from the head first. You can simply disconnect it from the rest of the exhaust system (2 nuts), remove the O2 sensors, and pull the head/manifold out together as one assembly. It's tight, but it'll fit.

If you aren't superman you'll probably be ready to pop a vein trying to pick it all up, but it's doable (did it myself a few nights ago on an E60). It's heavy though, no doubt about that.

tremartin06
11-29-2013, 08:06 PM
I am in the middle of replacing all of the above items while I have everything open. I have removed most of the clearance items and plan to tackle the E12 bolts tomorrow and finally pull out the Alternator Bracket. Hopefully USPS has no delays and will deliver my gasket tomorrow as scheduled. My question is: Does anyone know torque specs for the various alternator bracket bolts and engine mount bolts? Thanks in advance for you assistance!!

schpenxel
11-29-2013, 08:18 PM
http://bmw.workshop-manuals.com/5_Series_E60/545i_N62_SAL/index.phpindex.php?id=4 has basically everything

tremartin06
11-30-2013, 06:37 AM
http://bmw.workshop-manuals.com/5_Series_E60/545i_N62_SAL/index.phpindex.php?id=4 has basically everything

Thanks for the response!
I checked that site prior to posting. Maybe I don't understand how to read the torque page. It lists various bolt sizes/variations (M8, M10, M12, etc) along with colors (yellow or silver). However, the sizes that I'm looking for are not listed. For example, my ENGINE SUPPORT BRACKET uses the following fasteners:

M10X40-Z1-10.9
M10X60-Z1-ZNS3

and ALTERNATOR MOUNTING BRACKET

M8X30-ZNNIV SI
M10X35-U1
M8X80

Using the Workshop Manuals, how should I interpret the number after the 'X' or is it even relevant for torque?? :dunno: :dunno: :dunno:

Thanks in advance for your assistance....off to the dealer to pick up the solenoid O-rings. Hopefully I'll have good news once I return.....and get off those last 2 pesky (PIA) bolts on the rear of the engine support.

Also, taking Keif's advice and picking up an engine support. The engine hoist legs are just in my way under the vehicle!!! :mad: :mad: :mad:

schpenxel
11-30-2013, 06:57 AM
Thanks for the response!
I checked that site prior to posting. Maybe I don't understand how to read the torque page. It lists various bolt sizes/variations (M8, M10, M12, etc) along with colors (yellow or silver). However, the sizes that I'm looking for are not listed. For example, my ENGINE SUPPORT BRACKET uses the following fasteners:

M10X40-Z1-10.9
M10X60-Z1-ZNS3

and ALTERNATOR MOUNTING BRACKET

M8X30-ZNNIV SI
M10X35-U1
M8X80

Using the Workshop Manuals, how should I interpret the number after the 'X' or is it even relevant for torque?? :dunno: :dunno: :dunno:

Thanks in advance for your assistance....off to the dealer to pick up the solenoid O-rings. Hopefully I'll have good news once I return.....and get off those last 2 pesky (PIA) bolts on the rear of the engine support.

Also, taking Keif's advice and picking up an engine support. The engine hoist legs are just in my way under the vehicle!!! :mad: :mad: :mad:

The number after the X is just the bolt length in mm.. so M10x35 is an M10 bolt, 35mm long

So, yeah, basically it doesn't matter when looking up torques :)

fratan
11-30-2013, 07:16 AM
FYI,
Make sure your replace the alternator bracket seal under the bracket. There are 2 different types so buy both and return the one you don't use. This is a common oil leak failure and since your there this will save you time and money. I learned the hard way by not replacing the seal when we had to replace the alternator. Six months later, major oil leak.:p

schpenxel
11-30-2013, 07:47 AM
FYI,
Make sure your replace the alternator bracket seal under the bracket. There are 2 different types so buy both and return the one you don't use. This is a common oil leak failure and since your there this will save you time and money. I learned the hard way by not replacing the seal when we had to replace the alternator. Six months later, major oil leak.:p

Indeed--you do NOT want to have to do that job again.

I seriously thought about JB Welding the hole up on mine while I have the engine out

Also have thought about adding an oil cooler, not sure yet

tremartin06
11-30-2013, 10:19 AM
FYI,
Make sure your replace the alternator bracket seal under the bracket. There are 2 different types so buy both and return the one you don't use. This is a common oil leak failure and since your there this will save you time and money. I learned the hard way by not replacing the seal when we had to replace the alternator. Six months later, major oil leak.:p


Thanks FRATAN!
That $2.58 part is the main reason I'm doing all of this work. :cry: :cry: Just figured I would tackle as much as I could while everything was open.

tremartin06
11-30-2013, 10:22 AM
The number after the X is just the bolt length in mm.. so M10x35 is an M10 bolt, 35mm long

So, yeah, basically it doesn't matter when looking up torques :)

Thanks SCHPENXEL!
I sorta figured it out. Apparently the length does matter (no pun intended) as different lengths has different torgues. I'm going thru all of this in HOPES I'm able to torque the back 2 bolts once I start putting things back together. Now, IF I COULD ONLY GET THOSE TWO OUT!!!! Time to get back at it. Thanks all!!

schpenxel
11-30-2013, 04:37 PM
Thanks SCHPENXEL!
I sorta figured it out. Apparently the length does matter (no pun intended) as different lengths has different torgues.

Keep in mind that on some of the specs they'll have something like "M18 x 1.5". The 1.5 is a thread pitch so would probably have a different torque spec than say a 1.25 (threads per inch)

I think that's the difference you'll find in the torque specs

tremartin06
12-01-2013, 04:52 PM
What a weekend!!!
Alternator Bracket Seal Replacement - CHECK
Vacuum Pump Seals Replacement - CHECK
Solenoid Seals - CHECK
Oil Pressure Switch Replacement - CHECK
Alternator Replacement - OOPS....purchased wrong alternator. LOL

Took me 3 days off and on, but ooooooo what a feeling!!! What's next, valve stem seal replacement or crossover pipe???? What the heck, why not both!!! I'm a glutton for punishment. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

schpenxel
12-01-2013, 06:05 PM
Crossover pipe isn't bad if you're using the AGA or similar kit.. Basically just pull the intake and valley pan. The intake is a beast to lift on your own but I managed to do it. I did mine with water pump still on, but would probably be easier with it removed

Valve seals I haven't done with heads on (had machine shop swap them) so can't help there. Check my thread on the coolant crossover, tons of pictures, albeit for a 5 series

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=684294

fratan
12-01-2013, 06:48 PM
Great job doing the oil leak stuff. My son, the master mechanic , was talking about doing the valve stem seals and pulling the heads at the same time to bore out the carbon build up on a 2004 745 I. It would be nice but Not necessary since we just got it inspected today and passed the smokes. Nice to have a small ready monitor tool to know when the car is ready. We were getting a catalytic converter code but poured some cat cleaner in the oil and it seemed to work. Nice having inpa to clear the codes and a ready monitor tool. I think it was twenty bucks.


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schpenxel
12-01-2013, 06:51 PM
Great job doing the oil leak stuff. My son, the master mechanic , was talking about doing the valve stem seals and pulling the heads at the same time to bore out the carbon build up on a 2004 745 I. It would be nice but Not necessary since we just got it inspected today and passed the smokes. Nice to have a small ready monitor tool to know when the car is ready. We were getting a catalytic converter code but poured some cat cleaner in the oil and it seemed to work. Nice having inpa to clear the codes and a ready monitor tool. I think it was twenty bucks.


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Keep in mind that the cylinders are aluminum, they do not have steel liners like most engines..

I'd be scared of trying to clean the pistons from the top like that. I can't imagine aluminum standing up to carbon sliding around very well

tremartin06
12-08-2013, 02:22 PM
What a weekend!!!
Alternator Bracket Seal Replacement - CHECK
Vacuum Pump Seals Replacement - CHECK
Solenoid Seals - CHECK
Oil Pressure Switch Replacement - CHECK
Alternator Replacement - OOPS....purchased wrong alternator. LOL

Took me 3 days off and on, but ooooooo what a feeling!!! What's next, valve stem seal replacement or crossover pipe???? What the heck, why not both!!! I'm a glutton for punishment. :rofl::rofl::rofl:

Had my alternator rebuilt and I installed it yesterday. WHAT A DIFFERENCE!!!! There is a GREAT little shop in Marietta for those in the Atlanta area if you ever need yours rebuilt. It only set me back $146.

Hahano
12-27-2013, 07:42 AM
Has anyone done the job on a X5 E70 4.8i. I'm having trouble getting the driver side valve valve cover off. I am either not turning at the right angles or I didn't remove something that may be necessary to do the job. I can't seem to find a guide specific to the 4.8i . I can post pic if needed and am very willing to get help via phone or FaceTime or anything haha. I've taken the intake manifold of to do the valley pipe, also water pump and alternator to replace aswell.