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View Full Version : Questions about BRAKE replacement


$exy_Dirty
05-14-2010, 04:49 PM
Hi all mighty gurus, the BMW gods have put another spell upon me, ohh why?? jk :)

I have questions about DIY brake job/replacement, I did some research prior to posting this thread, I apologize if I have missed the thread and answers to my silly questions.

I found a great youtube.com link on how to change brakes on E46:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CcSstG_el-I

Very detailed how to with pics on E36
http://www.bimmerdiy.com/diy/e36brakesystem/

more on E39
http://forums.bimmerforums.com/forum/showthread.php?t=986325

But nothing on E60, are they all the same when it comes down to brake pads replacement? If you can provide with a better link or vid that would be awesome!

iDrive tells me that the rear brakes are due in 2k miles so Im considering to do it my self as the dealer wants $600 plus for it.

I see that people change the rotors as well when changing brake pads is that a must? Also please educate me on where to buy the parts for this brake job and or brands to choose or stay away from, thanks fellas!

$exy_Dirty
05-15-2010, 07:22 PM
Am I asking something ridiculous? or nobody has changed brake pads here and can't answer these questions for me? :)

Nube1kenobi
05-15-2010, 08:21 PM
The disc brake technology has not changed much over the years. The method of repair/replacement is mostly identical for all manufacturers and even model years. What you have there in the video is very helpful. As far as rotor replacement, that all depends on the remaining thickness of the rotor. I think if you search, you will find the permissible remaining thickness for your model year.

One of the more popular sources of anything tire/wheel related site is Tire Rack (http://www.tirerack.com/brakes/results.jsp?autoMake=BMW&autoModel=525i+Sedan+Sport+Package&autoYear=2005&autoModClar=).

If you do decide to replace your rotors and brake pads, it will behove you to read the procedures for bedding your new brake pads and rotors:
http://www.tirerack.com/brakes/tech/techpage.jsp?techid=85&currentpage=80

The reason no one replied is probably the weekend fun most are having with their bimmers. :)

Spyder
05-16-2010, 03:35 PM
I see that people change the rotors as well when changing brake pads is that a must? Also please educate me on where to buy the parts for this brake job and or brands to choose or stay away from, thanks fellas!

BMW generally recommends replacing, not turning, rotors when pads are changed, but you can also use rotor thickness as a guide, especially when pads are replaced early, eg, to reduce dusting.

I ordered new pads for my 650 and 535 (they are identical), and new rotors for the 535, from Zeckhausen Racing. After a conversation with Dave Zeckhausen, this is what I ordered...

2007 BMW 650i
2008 BMW 535i (RWD)

Products
------------------------------------------------------
2 x Axxis Deluxe Advanced brake pads - rear (D919) [1 box required] (63-213-0919) = $142.00
2 x Axxis Deluxe Advanced brake pads - front (D918) [1 box required] (63-213-0918) = $188.00
2 x Centric Premium rear rotor 345x24mm (2 required) (120.34072) = $194.00
2 x Centric Premium front rotor 348x30mm (2 required) (120.34071) = $216.00
1 x Brake pad wear sensor for BMW - Rear (64-116-34029) = $24.00
1 x Brake pad wear sensor for BMW - Front (64-116-34028) = $24.00

I actually prefer the slightly less grabby pedal feel on the 650 after installing the Axxis pads. Dusting is history. I'll be changing pads and rotors on the 535 shortly.

Spyder

fnc
05-17-2010, 11:23 AM
This may be your best bet for trust worthy info http://www.bentleypublishers.com/bmw/5-series/525i/2004-2007/BMW-5-Series-E60-E61-Repair-Manual-2004-2010.html

jesimmons
05-17-2010, 09:46 PM
The Bentley manual would be great but it's not available for another month. I can't locate the e60 instructions at the moment. But I will say that they are so similar to other models from a brake system perspective that the instructions are identical. I replaced my BMW pads with the Axxis pads when I had less than 1800 miles on the car. It was a simple job an took me a Saturday morning to do. Replacing the rotors might have added an hour to the job assuming no difficulty removing the rotor retaining bolt or the old rotors.

txag_530i
05-18-2010, 06:33 AM
These two files should help you out. Don't worry about the special tools listed, you can use off-the-shelf Craftsman equivalents and be just fine. IIRCC, the bit required for the caliper guide pins is 7mm.

230610
230609

I'd recommend these vendors for parts:

http://www.autohausaz.com/

http://www.pelicanparts.com/bmw/index.htm

http://www.importrp.com/index.php

Be sure to let us know if you need any help.

Good luck!

grateful1
05-18-2010, 07:36 AM
Replacing the rotors might have added an hour to the job assuming no difficulty removing the rotor retaining bolt or the old rotors.

I have never had the rotors on any of my cars come off even remotely easy. I have always used PB Blaster and would recommend it as I have had a lot of success with it. Living in an area with a lot of salt in the winters, my rotors always rust onto the axel.

txag_530i
05-18-2010, 10:44 AM
I have never had the rotors on any of my cars come off even remotely easy. I have always used PB Blaster and would recommend it as I have had a lot of success with it. Living in an area with a lot of salt in the winters, my rotors always rust onto the axel.

Have you ever used anti-sieze on the back of the rotors and wheels? The anti-sieze will usually prevent the hub from sticking to the rotor, and the wheel from sticking to the rotor.

230622

Of course the factory doesn't do this so the initial change can be difficult.

grateful1
05-18-2010, 11:29 AM
Yes, I always use anti seize and have yet to see it work. Actually, I take that back. One time I used anti seize on all four axels and the next time I want to change my rotors all of them seized up with the exception of one. Can't really figure out to this day why the anti seize didn't do it's job.

Nube1kenobi
05-18-2010, 03:42 PM
Yes, I always use anti seize and have yet to see it work. Actually, I take that back. One time I used anti seize on all four axels and the next time I want to change my rotors all of them seized up with the exception of one. Can't really figure out to this day why the anti seize didn't do it's job.

Anti-seize compounds normally do not work well in areas where it is exposed to a lot of heat. We used it a lot before, until we ran into issues where they almost weld the mated parts together... no fun trying to remove cobalt alloyed bolts from nickel cadmium parts.

JerseyGeorge
05-19-2010, 05:46 PM
have you ever used anti-sieze on the back of the rotors and wheels? The anti-sieze will usually prevent the hub from sticking to the rotor, and the wheel from sticking to the rotor.

230622

of course the factory doesn't do this so the initial change can be difficult.

+1

Permatex® Anti-Seize Lubricant

A highly refined blend of aluminum, copper and graphite lubricants. Use during assembly to prevent galling, corrosion and seizing and to assure easier disassembly. Temperature range: -60°F to 1600°F (-51°Cto 871°C). Salt, corrosion and moisture resistant ***8211; ideal for marine use. Non-aerosol version meets Mil Spec #907E. Aerosol - Level 3

Nube1kenobi
05-19-2010, 06:05 PM
+1

Permatex® Anti-Seize Lubricant

A highly refined blend of aluminum, copper and graphite lubricants. Use during assembly to prevent galling, corrosion and seizing and to assure easier disassembly. Temperature range: -60°F to 1600°F (-51°Cto 871°C). Salt, corrosion and moisture resistant – ideal for marine use. Non-aerosol version meets Mil Spec #907E. Aerosol - Level 3

Let's hope they tightened that spec because I get nightmares over the 62 bolts of hell on a J52-P408B. :)

$exy_Dirty
05-24-2010, 01:30 PM
Thanks guys for all the input and links I have been busy for the past few days and didn't have time to checkout this forum... I will do my brakes in a short while I still have 2k miles to go on the rear and computer says I have like 4-5k left on the front should I do both at same time or 4k is too early? thanks

jesimmons
05-24-2010, 01:48 PM
If you're going to do the job yourself and they are that close, I'd just do them all at once and be done with it. However... the miles indicator is only approximate. Inspection of the pad thickness will be a better indicator. If there is plenty of pad left they may not need changing yet. If the pads are getting real thin, go ahead and change them now. If the pad wear sensors haven't started to wear off you might even be able to put the new pads in without having to buy new wear sensors. BTW...BMW says you shouldn't reuse a brake wear sensor even if it has not been worn at all. Supposedly the simple act of unclipping it from the old pad renders the clip incapable of holding tight to the new pad. I was able to reuse mine, though.