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View Full Version : They had promised not to build a van (and some other spy pictures)


Alex Baumann
11-19-2003, 11:10 AM
More and more news from Munich is indicating that they are working on a van :eek:

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/41999.jpg

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/41998.jpg

6 Series cabrio

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/42002.jpg

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/42003.jpg

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/42004.jpg

Alex Baumann
11-19-2003, 11:10 AM
E90

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/40035.jpg

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/40037.jpg

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/40038.jpg

E90 Touring


http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/40039.jpg

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/40040.jpg


All pictures and images are courtesy of Autobild.de

mbr129
11-19-2003, 11:21 AM
Holy Fat-A$$ rear end on the E90! :eek:

The Roadstergal
11-19-2003, 11:21 AM
I'm more disgusted by the concept of a BMW SAV than by the concept of a BMW van. :dunno:

Alex Baumann
11-19-2003, 11:24 AM
I'm more disgusted by the concept of a BMW SAV than by the concept of a BMW van. :dunno:

LOL! They are selling every bit they are building at the moment. So, life will go on ;)

Plaz
11-19-2003, 11:26 AM
I'm more disgusted by the concept of a BMW SAV than by the concept of a BMW van. :dunno:

Pete Teoh
11-19-2003, 11:26 AM
LOL! They are selling every bit they are building at the moment. So, life will go on ;)
The van looks kinda cute. If it's about the same size as a MB A-class, it could have some fans in Europe. :thumbup:

Kaz
11-19-2003, 11:26 AM
The old drawings of the V3 and V5 vans looked a lot better.

vexed
11-19-2003, 11:30 AM
I found this on another site:eeps:

BMW rules out ‘boring’ MPVs
10 October 2003

BMW has ruled out the idea of following arch-rival Mercedes by building an MPV, even though it is seeking to explore new markets.

Dr Helmut Panke, chairman of BMW’s board, said: ‘We will not build an MPV. We had been working on more flexible and practical vehicles, but the board was not happy and said that such cars did not feel like BMWs. We will never build a boring BMW.’

He was speaking as BMW introduced two new niche models which are due to arrive in the UK next year. The 6-series coupe, priced at just under £50,000, goes on sale in March, while the X3 junior 4x4, which will cost from just under £29,000, arrives in May.

Later in the year, BMW will launch the all-new 1-series small hatch, its rival to the Volkswagen Golf and Ford Focus. The 1-series will be unique in its class in having rear-wheel drive and will be smaller than today’s 3-series. Pictures of the new car have not yet been released, but clues to its styling were provided by the CS1 concept seen at the Geneva Motor Show earlier this year.

‘Within the next five years, we will launch derivations of the present range rather than all-new niche models,’ added Dr Panke.

pdz
11-19-2003, 11:30 AM
those e90 pictures make it look like the current crop of rover saloons.

can't wait for unencumbered photos. it's the last stand, gents.

that van is cute. all it needs are angels at its four corners, also.

TD
11-19-2003, 12:02 PM
I'm more disgusted by the concept of a BMW SAV than by the concept of a BMW van. :dunno:

LmtdSlip
11-19-2003, 12:33 PM
The rear of the 6 series vert looks like a Solara to me....at least the trunk and tail lights. The lower bumper says Mitsubishi spyder.

So much for the destinctive BMW styling.

SONET
11-19-2003, 12:45 PM
Based on history and looking at the pictures, it's looking more and more like the E90 is going to be as big as the E39 was. Why must they always grow in size? Bigger isn't always better.

Unless they use a substantial amount of CF in the body, it's going to be too heavy for a coupe IMHO (the E46 could already stand to lose a couple hundred pounds as it is). Something that size would have to be pushing 3600 pounds.

The upcoming 1 / 2 series is looking better all the time - especially a 3.0 or M iteration. I hope it comes in coupe form in the US, and more importantly that it weighs in at under 3,000 pounds.

--SONET

OBS3SSION
11-19-2003, 01:01 PM
Van = Cargo Capacity

That BMW "van" has none. It looks more like a BMW version of the Audi A2 or A3. It is cute though, and I'd rather be driving one of those than an X5.

I'm on the fence about Bangle... not caring for the 7, thinking the 5 is okay... but I must say I love what I'm seeing on that 6, and I also like the Z. Hopefully, the E90 will not dissapoint... and hopefully we'll see the touring here in the United States of Generica.

A fast, fun and good looking 1 or 2 Series could be quite the car...

Jeff_DML
11-19-2003, 01:44 PM
thanks for the pic.

wagon looks to curvey for me, I like the more angular muscular lines of my current E46 wagon.

What with the guy with no shirt? :D Doesnt BMWAG have a dress code :rofl:

pdz
11-19-2003, 01:50 PM
thanks for the pic.

wagon looks to curvey for me, I like the more angular muscular lines of my current E46 wagon.

What with the guy with no shirt? :D Doesnt BMWAG have a dress code :rofl:

guy with no-shirt.....didn't know they had red lobster over in europe also.

LOL

Kaz
11-19-2003, 01:51 PM
thanks for the pic.

wagon looks to curvey for me, I like the more angular muscular lines of my current E46 wagon.


Yeah, the lack of the 'sicke' and the rather roundy ass makes it look like, I dunno, an Opel or EuroFord or something.

Alex Baumann
11-19-2003, 01:59 PM
What with the guy with no shirt? :D Doesnt BMWAG have a dress code :rofl:

:lmao:

I think the photos were shot in Southern France at Istres, where BMW owns a test track (Miramas)

EZ
11-19-2003, 02:43 PM
Aside from being too large for my tastes, the E90 sedan looks pretty good, especially the last shot -- very airdynamic and aggressive. Having said that, I'd look at the upcoming 1/2 series very closely before even considering this elephantous automobile.

Sean
11-19-2003, 04:22 PM
The 1st pic of the van looks good, for a van. :eek:

JetBlack330i
11-21-2003, 03:41 AM
I'm more disgusted by the concept of a BMW SAV than by the concept of a BMW van. :dunno:
How is that van different than an X3?
I'm affraid I can't wait till 2008 :cry:

postoak
11-21-2003, 06:03 AM
This article:

http://www.autoweek.com/cat_content.mv?port_code=autoweek&cat_code=carnews&loc_code=index&content_code=07003119

seems to indicate that the automakers, including BMW, think it important to have an offering for each market segment. I don't have a business background and don't know why this would be thought necessary but apparently it is.

LeucX3
11-21-2003, 09:30 AM
The e90 ass looks like a Jetta IV. Not that there's anything too wrong with that, other than it looks rather vanilla. But with recent BMW designs, i'm not complaining about that at all.

Salvator
11-24-2003, 12:39 PM
guy with no-shirt.....didn't know they had red lobster over in europe also.

LOL
And why do they all wear those giant rectangular sunglasses... what's up with that? ; )

hts
11-24-2003, 05:34 PM
As the one who wears the pants in my household, I'd be very, very happy with a BMW-ish minivan. Doesn't even have to be from BMW. I'd take one from Acura in a heartbeat, but alas, I fear that Acura, like BMW, just doesn't want to be associated with anything MV-ish.

Oh well, if they don't build it, how can we come? In any event, if it doesn't arrive sometime in the next 8-10 years (my estimated timeframe for needing/wanting a minivan), it won't matter (at least not to us).

By then, we'll be moving on to the Acura TL (or replacement) for the missus and the rug-rats (who won't be rug-rats by then).

ff
11-24-2003, 05:42 PM
That van looks smaller than even the X3. What's the sense?

WILLIA///M
11-25-2003, 04:09 PM
Based on history and looking at the pictures, it's looking more and more like the E90 is going to be as big as the E39 was. Why must they always grow in size? Bigger isn't always better.

Unless they use a substantial amount of CF in the body, it's going to be too heavy for a coupe IMHO (the E46 could already stand to lose a couple hundred pounds as it is). Something that size would have to be pushing 3600 pounds.

The upcoming 1 / 2 series is looking better all the time - especially a 3.0 or M iteration. I hope it comes in coupe form in the US, and more importantly that it weighs in at under 3,000 pounds.

--SONET

Ditto. Too big.

wannabimmer
11-27-2003, 09:33 AM
More and more news from Munich is indicating that they are working on a van :eek:

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/41999.jpg

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/41998.jpg

6 Series cabrio

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/42002.jpg

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/42003.jpg

http://bilder.autobild.de/bilder/1/42004.jpg
November 26, 2003 11:05 a.m. EST


MEDIA & MARKETING


BMW's CEO
Just Says 'No'
To Protect Brand

By NEAL E. BOUDETTE
Staff Reporter of THE WALL STREET JOURNAL


Take a look at which auto makers are making money these days, and it should be no surprise that one of the hottest topics in the industry is "brand management." Companies with strong brand images are raking in profit -- despite slumping demand in Europe and a price war in the U.S. It's not a matter of offering high-priced "luxury" products. Volume sellers such as Japan's Toyota Motor Corp. as well as premium players such as Germany's Bayerische Motoren Werke AG are speeding ahead, because customers are simply willing to pay more for their brands. Companies with weaker images, such as the Big Three U.S. auto makers, are forced to slug it out in profit-sapping incentive wars.

Few companies are as fixated on grooming their image as BMW. Helmut Panke, the company's 57-year-old chief executive, says a brand isn't just a label or a marketing campaign. It requires a mind-set that has to permeate an organization, from the top down into everything the company does. His company focuses on upscale brands only -- BMW, Rolls Royce and Mini -- and it's paying off. This year Munich-based BMW will sell more than one million cars for the second year in a row, up from 675,000 in 1997.

Trained as a nuclear engineer, Mr. Panke worked at McKinsey & Co. for four years, joined BMW in 1982, ran the car maker's U.S. unit from 1993 until 1995 and became CEO in 2002. He recently talked about BMW's brand philosophy with The Wall Street Journal. Excerpts from that interview:

WSJ: BMW is one of the top brands in any industry. For you, as CEO, are there special responsibilities you have in maintaining or building your brand image?

Mr. Panke: As provocative as it sounds, the biggest task is to be able to say, "No." Because in the end, authentic brand management boils down to understanding that a brand is a promise that has to be fulfilled everywhere, at any time. So when something doesn't fit, you must make sure that that is not done. The most important role of senior management, not just the CEO, is to understand that the brand is not just a label that you can put on and take off. BMW ... settle[s] for fewer compromises, which goes back to what the brand stands for.




WSJ: When was the last significant time you said "no"?

Mr. Panke: The last significant time was tied into the debate on the expansion of our product program. There is a segment in the market which BMW is not catering to and that is the minivan or the MPV segment. We don't have a van because a van as it is in the market today does not fulfill any of the BMW group brand values. We all as a team said no. We will not bring a van.

WSJ: Why did you think you could turn the Mini into a premium brand? The original version from the "60s wasn't an upscale car.

Mr. Panke: In hindsight it sounds so logical yet there was a certain element of uncertainty, maybe even risk. The first generation of Minis was a very compact but very agile car. It was the first that had the engine mounted transversely in the front for a front-wheel drive. The wheels at the four corners gave the go-cart-like feeling. Through the "60s and "70s the Mini kept its appeal. No group of people felt excluded. With this starting situation, we came to the conclusion that premium is a question of concept for any vehicle and not a question of size; that there is a market for a small premium car because why should people settle for less safety, less innovation, less flexibility? We said, "Go full speed ahead."

WSJ: In the past 10 years, a key point in time was the Rover sale in 2000, because you ended up with kind of a clean slate. A big piece of the former strategy was now off the table. What did you do right after the sale and what are you trying to do now?

Mr. Panke: The reason for the separation of the Rover Group is that premium and mass don't necessarily mix and jive. It's different focus points in there... . From March 1999 through March 2000 we had hundreds of top people shuttling over to England trying to turn around the situation and it began to get to the psychological side of the organization. "Gee, we are putting all that effort in there and nothing happens." Internally I used this example: If you try at home to repair a washing machine or a cuckoo clock weekend after weekend, when you could be having fun, and you finally just decide to get rid of it... . This led to the premium brand strategy -- to continue a profitable growth with products in different sizes, different characteristics but all of them having one common envelope around them, premium character.

WSJ: What you're saying about having premium and volume in the same organization, that means in your opinion many of your competitors are on the wrong track.

Mr. Panke: We can only comment from our experience. One always goes for compromises, if it has to be a little bit of both markets in there. So it's again coming back to knowing what you stand for, what your strengths are and executing that strength. You can be highly successful in both parts of the automobile market but you have to decide where you compete. You can't be a little bit of both.

It's maybe easiest to understand when you focus such a discussion on products. One of my favorite examples is the blindfold test. Take any of the BMW brand products, sit in them, touch it, feel it, hear it, feel the feedback from the road. You know exactly this is what a BMW feels like. In our premium brand strategy, the Minis had to be called Minis because they feel completely different. It is exciting to drive but it is different. One of your American colleagues said that brands are just skin deep. No, it's not. It has to be authentic, through everything you do.

WSJ: How deep into the details of projecting this image do you go? For example, do you look at even something like the BMW pens the company gives away, to make sure they project the right brand values?

Mr. Panke: In the end there is no limit to what degree of detail you go. But in regular intervals, something like every 1 1/2 years, the entire board of management gets a presentation of the lifestyle programs that are associated with the brands. Not just the clothing, it is all the accessories. We touch the materials. We don't decide the exact design of a T-shirt or some sports jacket, but mak[e] sure that from all the senses, the color schemes, the materials, the design directions that are different for BMW-brand accessories than for Mini-brand accessories.

WSJ: Next year you will launch the new 1 Series, a less-expensive model that could bring new customers into the BMW brand. But part of the brand is exclusivity. How do you balance that: expanding without losing exclusivity?

Mr. Panke: I think your question starts with the wrong assumption. The 1 Series is not going to be a small car and it's not going to be a cheap car. The 1 Series will have basically the same exact dimensions as the famous 2002, the car that is still the icon of the archetypical BMW in the U.S. [Over the years] cars continued to grow, generation by generation. So today's 3 Series has basically the same physical dimensions as the first-generation 5 Series had. So we kind of moved up by growing the cars out of that segment where we all started with the compact sport sedan.

At the same time we also learned there is a segment of customers who have grown up with front-wheel drive [cars] which have hatches. The 1 series will bring to that segment a slightly smaller model than the 3 series ... and it will be the only one with rear wheel drive, giving you that BMW feeling. It is not going to be a car that competes on volume.

Plaz
11-27-2003, 10:23 AM
November 26, 2003 11:05 a.m. EST


MEDIA & MARKETING


BMW's CEO
Just Says 'No'
To Protect Brand


Sounds like a wise, thoughtful man, with the right priorities.

Thanks for the article!

Bruce128iC
11-27-2003, 02:20 PM
I'm starting to definitely see a 6-series cabriolet in my future. What an absolutely STUNNING car. Can't wait to see one in person! Big :thumbup: from me! :D :bigpimp:

GimpyMcFarlan
11-27-2003, 03:46 PM
The more I look at the 6-series photos the more I :drool: over it. I originally thought about buying my coupe after the lease is up but, if my finances allow it, I might have to go for a 6 series in 2 years. :D

beware_phog
11-27-2003, 06:12 PM
This article:

http://www.autoweek.com/cat_content.mv?port_code=autoweek&cat_code=carnews&loc_code=index&content_code=07003119

seems to indicate that the automakers, including BMW, think it important to have an offering for each market segment. I don't have a business background and don't know why this would be thought necessary but apparently it is.

I'll tell you why. People like a brand. We, for example, like BMW for a variety of reason. Let's say you are in the market for a type of car your brand doesn' t carry, that means you'll go shop around when in reality, you'd love a BMW. How many people bought Ford Explorer's before the X5 arrived?

And then as you think about, you might run into another brand that you might like. Let's say you buy a Lexus SUV because you need one. Now when your 5-series lease comes up you check out the Lexus LS430 or whatever.

I'm good with it. As long as the new market segment maintains what the niche of the car maker is, it's all good.