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View Full Version : Taking care of some chips and scratches.


ventsyv
03-12-2011, 03:52 PM
I read through the guides, but I still have a few questions. Here is what my car looks like:

http://img151.imageshack.us/img151/7178/dsc0021gu.th.jpg (http://img151.imageshack.us/i/dsc0021gu.jpg/)
http://img696.imageshack.us/img696/787/dsc0030ay.th.jpg (http://img696.imageshack.us/i/dsc0030ay.jpg/)
http://img855.imageshack.us/img855/6441/dsc0022w.th.jpg (http://img855.imageshack.us/i/dsc0022w.jpg/)
http://img844.imageshack.us/img844/2700/dsc0024nm.th.jpg (http://img844.imageshack.us/i/dsc0024nm.jpg/)
http://img835.imageshack.us/img835/9440/dsc0025mt.th.jpg (http://img835.imageshack.us/i/dsc0025mt.jpg/)
http://img852.imageshack.us/img852/2050/dsc0027b.th.jpg (http://img852.imageshack.us/i/dsc0027b.jpg/)
http://img862.imageshack.us/img862/4260/dsc0029d.th.jpg (http://img862.imageshack.us/i/dsc0029d.jpg/)


As you can see, the chips are not very big, I was wondering, should I use paint or just waxing will cover take care of them? Any way to take care of that big crack on the back bumper? Insurance said it will cost around $500 and I had to pay $250, which I thought is expensive.

CGdetailing
03-12-2011, 11:05 PM
for the chips you will have to use something that's specifically for the job. For example, touch up paint. wax will not cover up the chips.

Johnz3mc
03-13-2011, 01:22 AM
Dr. Colorchip or Paintscratch.com offers systems and paints for your chips.

The back bumper is another matter and the 500 bucks/250 insurance deductable isn't expensive at all, it's really quite reasonable.

ventsyv
03-13-2011, 08:36 AM
I see. I have some extra paint left from previous scratch repair (it's matched to my car obviously), so I guess I should use the "tooth pick method" then? The back bumper is not DIY-able? I though it's expensive because for $500 I can get a new bumper.

DetailDan
03-13-2011, 12:05 PM
Were you looking to remove the swirls as well? http://img844.imageshack.us/f/dsc0024nm.jpg/

ventsyv
03-13-2011, 11:07 PM
Absolutely. I'm planning to do a full wax job on it, but I figured I need to take care of the chips first.

DetailDan
03-14-2011, 08:21 AM
Gotcha. A wax is not going to remove those swirl marks though.

ventsyv
03-14-2011, 08:35 AM
It won't ? I'm planning to clay it, paint the chips, then use orbital to buff out the swirls with wax. Isn't that the general procedure? Or do I have to buff out the swirls with another chemical and then wax??

DetailDan
03-14-2011, 02:46 PM
You need to use some type of polish first, then wax. Its not a simple process and very time consuming, when done right.

dvon
03-14-2011, 03:14 PM
It won't ? I'm planning to clay it, paint the chips, then use orbital to buff out the swirls with wax. Isn't that the general procedure? Or do I have to buff out the swirls with another chemical and then wax??

You need to use a polish with your orbital not wax to remove swirls. All wax does is protect the paint, won't do anything at all to remove swirls.

Johnz3mc
03-14-2011, 03:54 PM
Ventsyv,
Here's a pretty good primer for people new to detailing.
Have a look at the section called 'compounding, polishing, waxing'. It shows a little graphic which will help explain the difference between compounding and polishing then waxing.
In a nutshell, compounding and polishing actually abrade the surface of the clearcoat down to a smooth, highly polished surface. The wax then goes on top of that smooth surface to add a sacrificial layer for the elements and as a bonus, adds a whole bunch of shine.
There are different products for these three tasks just because one product can't possibly do more than 1 job. That's why everybody is mentioning that a wax can't really polish out the swirls.
Here's the article:
http://www.properautocare.com/usporcabpol.html

ventsyv
03-15-2011, 12:23 PM
I see. I bought Mothers California Gold 3 step waxing set and a clay bar. So I have :

1. Pre-wax cleaner
2. Sealer and glaze
3. Carnauba wax

I've read a number of tutorials and I know the major steps:

1. Wash car
2. Wash with dish soap to take off any wax. (Rinse obviously)
3. Clay (read on quite a bit so I'm comfortable)
4. Fix chips using toothpick method
5. Use the Mothers chemical and orbital to buff the car allowing enough drying time between hands.

Am I missing something? Is the Mothers set adequate? I don't strive for perfection, this being my first time.

dvon
03-15-2011, 01:03 PM
I see. I bought Mothers California Gold 3 step waxing set and a clay bar. So I have :

1. Pre-wax cleaner
2. Sealer and glaze
3. Carnauba wax

I've read a number of tutorials and I know the major steps:

1. Wash car
2. Wash with dish soap to take off any wax. (Rinse obviously)
3. Clay (read on quite a bit so I'm comfortable)
4. Fix chips using toothpick method
5. Use the Mothers chemical and orbital to buff the car allowing enough drying time between hands.

Am I missing something? Is the Mothers set adequate? I don't strive for perfection, this being my first time.

I'm not sure that the pre-cleaner is abrasive enough to remove your scratches/swirls. You can try it but I'm not sure it's going to do the job. Does anywhere near you sell Meguaris 105 and 205?

DetailDan
03-15-2011, 01:26 PM
Is the Mothers set adequate?

That really wont do anything for the scratches, swirls, and other imperfections. You will have some clean paint though.

Ilovemycar
03-15-2011, 02:59 PM
You can try it but I'm not sure it's going to do the job. Does anywhere near you sell Meguaris 105 and 205?

Amazon sells those, which is nice for us detailing enthusiasts who deal with shipping charges so often.

ventsyv
03-16-2011, 09:52 AM
So forget about the pre-cleaner and use Meguaris 105 and 205 instead?? Is that going to take care of the scratches? Do I use 105 first and then 205?
I opened Meguaris web site - they have a ton of different swirl and scratch removers - any suggestions what should I use in terms of chemicals ?

DetailDan
03-16-2011, 10:39 AM
I used 205 once and wasnt impressed with it. 105 is a good compound, removes heavy defects, cuts quick, but dusts a lot. For your car, I would recommend Meguiars 105, then Menzerna 203s, then Menzerna 106 or 85rd. You may also want to look into the new Meguiars DA Microfiber System.

Keep in mind you'll probably be spending a few hundred for products if you dont have any yet. A proper orbital polisher is $110+.

ventsyv
03-16-2011, 10:46 AM
So that will buff out the scratches? Do I have to use something different for the swirls? I'm guessing that the each hand is finer and finer??
The orbital I was planning to rent for a day from Home Depot. They also have 8 inch orbitals for sale for about $50...

DetailDan
03-16-2011, 11:00 AM
Those polishes are for swirls, scratches, and other imperfections in the paint. The buffers from Home Depot wont work. Most popular are Porter Cable 7424, Griots Garage 6", and Meguiars G110v2.

dvon
03-16-2011, 04:52 PM
So that will buff out the scratches? Do I have to use something different for the swirls? I'm guessing that the each hand is finer and finer??
The orbital I was planning to rent for a day from Home Depot. They also have 8 inch orbitals for sale for about $50...

Honestly if you don't plan on buying a Porter Cable just pay a detailer to do your car for you. If you do plan on getting a buffer get a Porter Cable 7424xp,

schmatt
03-16-2011, 07:51 PM
When you're polishing your paint, you always want to start with the least aggressive paint correction first, then continue to get more aggressive until you are satisfied with the results. Then continue to go backwards from there until you end it with the lightest polish. Whenever you polish the paint, you are actually removing a layer of clear coat. You always want to remove the least amount possible. Also, there are different types of pads for different amounts of cutting. The white pads are generally less abrasive, but still used for polishes. The yellow pads are more aggressive. The blue or black pads are generally used for waxes, because there is no cutting action to them. It is good to have a large pad, 6-8" for most surfaces, but a smaller pad is also useful for the tighter areas. The pads are generally velcro, so you need a velcro backer for the DA. The whole thing will take a minimum of a full day, and probably 2 for your first time. Unless you enjoy this type of thing, I would just hire someone to do it. All in, you will probably spend $400+ just to get setup with a DA, pads and chemicals.

Also, keep in mind that you never want to wax over fresh paint. You always want to wait at least a month for that. When you wax the paint, it not only seals it from external contaminants, it seals it from curing as well.