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View Full Version : White Lake Country pad melts & shreds in 90 minutes


AZDrPhil
05-15-2011, 04:22 PM
I was polishing away today with a White LC 5.5" pad. Using Griots Garage DA on a setting of 6. After about 90 minutes of on-off use the pad decided it had enough and flew off the backing plate. The center of the poor thing was half melted and it had fused itself into the velcro on the plate. The plate was pretty hot, especially in the center.

It took me 30 minutes to clean the foam, rubber, glue, etc. out of the backing plate. I thought it was a gonner.

Pros: Aren't these pads supposed to be more durable than this or was the pad defective? What can one do to prevent this?

Angelo@properautocare.com
05-15-2011, 06:00 PM
Did you use it for about 90 min's in polishing?

csmeance
05-15-2011, 06:53 PM
how large of a backing plate were you using? Was it 90 minutes of continuous polishing?

Todd@properautocare.com
05-15-2011, 08:11 PM
Wow...

The pad should be more durable. What size backing plate where you using and was the pad wet (from a previous wash) when you started using it?

Angelo@properautocare.com
05-16-2011, 04:57 AM
Give me a call and maybe I can help your on this.

DetailDan
05-16-2011, 07:39 AM
Were you using the paper washer between the backing plate and the machine?

AZDrPhil
05-16-2011, 07:53 AM
Size of backing plate: 5"
Washer Installed: yes
Was pad wet?: no, it had never been used before

I did mist the pad once or twice using Adams detail spray several times before applying more polish. Garage temp was about 88 - 90. Also I applied a good amount of pressure but not excessive, the pad was rotating the entire time. It just built up way to much heat.

Angelo@properautocare.com
05-16-2011, 09:54 AM
Thank you Phil, it was great to talk to you. I will get back to you.

AZDrPhil
05-16-2011, 12:39 PM
Angelo: thank you for helping on this.

I received a call from the pad manufacturer and have received some hints and tips to avoid future occurrences.

1) don't apply as much pressure
2) if correction isn't occurring use a stronger compound and/or denser pad
3) clean or swap pad every two panels
4) use thicker pads instead of 7/8" pads if needing to apply lots of pressure

DetailDan
05-16-2011, 12:56 PM
I would run the machine at speed 4- 5. You can do some serious correcting at those speeds. 6 is almost not needed.

Todd@properautocare.com
05-16-2011, 07:28 PM
Angelo: thank you for helping on this.

I received a call from the pad manufacturer and have received some hints and tips to avoid future occurrences.

1) don't apply as much pressure
2) if correction isn't occurring use a stronger compound and/or denser pad
3) clean or swap pad every two panels
4) use thicker pads instead of 7/8" pads if needing to apply lots of pressure



1) don't apply as much pressure- This is far to subjective. Who is to say you were pressing too hard to begin with? 10-15 lbs of pressure is the general recommended amount.

2) Of course.

3) You should be cleaning your pad after each application if you are truly trying to achieve the best results. If you notice heat build up in the pad, simply spinning it (at speed 4) with no pressure for a couple of seconds will dramatically cool the pad.

4) I don't agree with this what-so-ever. I assume the premise is because the larger volume of foam (in a taller pad) will dissipate heat better?

The problem is that a taller pad is going to have more internal flex and do a much poorer job of transmitting the orbital motion of the backing plate to the surface being polisher. This motion is lost do to the internal twisting and stretching of the foam, and is the main reason that an orbital machine's pad gets so warm.

In fact using a low-profile pad will require less pressure to get the same results (perhaps even better results) as a tall profile pad. (I could give you a 20 paragraph reason why but I have already been long winded.).

Angelo@properautocare.com
05-17-2011, 05:59 AM
Great to hear you talk to one of the best MFG's in this industry and got the right information about the pad in question.