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View Full Version : Headlight restoration failure -- what went wrong?


output5151
07-09-2011, 04:18 PM
I just used the Mothers PowerBall restoration kit and now my headlight looks worse than before. I used the "Severe Damage Headlight Restoration Pack" and now my light looks all scratched. Anyone have experience with this? What did I do wrong?

I followed the directions to a tee...Any tips? Thanks!

noego
07-09-2011, 08:22 PM
without seeing photos of your lenses i can only speculate that you need to keep sanding and stepping down with progressively finer grit sandpaper. finish down with 2000 or 3000 grit and then use a final step of polish to achieve a +/- crystal clear appearance to your lenses. for the polish you could use Plastx or a polish that you use on your car's paint. you should use a cordless drill with an attachment for a foam applicator pad. 3M sells ($20.00) a kit for headlight restoration and the drill attachment and the foam pad are in the kit.

good luck! i've cleaned up lots of headlight lenses, but one of the pros (Dboy is good at this process) should be along to offer their guidance.

csmeance
07-09-2011, 11:46 PM
I just used the Mothers PowerBall restoration kit and now my headlight looks worse than before. I used the "Severe Damage Headlight Restoration Pack" and now my light looks all scratched. Anyone have experience with this? What did I do wrong?

I followed the directions to a tee...Any tips? Thanks!

Did you follow through with the rest of the polishes and such? The way headlight refinishing works is that you use a heavy grit of compound/sand paper and remove the layer of yellow film that's on the headlight. Then you use finer and finer compound/sandpaper until almost all the scratches are gone but the light is still cloudy. Then you use a polish to help get rid of any other scratches and clear up the cloudiness and then follow up with a sealant to keep the yellowing from coming back.

Ilovemycar
07-10-2011, 11:17 AM
What the other guys said^. A quick google doesn't show much in the way of various "grits" in the kit. There are some vids about doing this, and you'll often see cross-hatch wet sanding. In my very limited experiences with limited results, this does appear to take quite a bit of time and effort, depending on the age/oxidation.

Then the point about protecting with a sealant so that your work doesn't go to waste immediately is a good one. Some high end pros are using some anti UV coating device, I have no idea what in the heck it is called or how much it costs. I've seen others use Opti-coat, a permanent sealant, but that's not cheap either.