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JSpira
11-13-2012, 09:14 PM
I hope this gives you some ideas on what you can do to get at least a few hours of sleep on flights...


How to Sleep During a Flight: The Secrets of In-Flight Slumber (http://www.frequentbusinesstraveler.com/2012/11/how-to-sleep-during-a-flight-the-secrets-of-in-flight-slumber/)


by Jonathan Spira
Sleeping during flights is a challenge for many people. Indeed, until recently, Iíve only managed to achieve sleep on flights that met several qualifications, including being at my regular bedtime and having a comfortable lie-flat seat/bed.

While lie-flat beds and mattress toppers help, the odds are still against you when it comes to getting a restful nightís sleep during a flight. Low humidity, cabin pressure, noise, ambient light, smells, and of Ö
Read the full story Ľ (http://www.frequentbusinesstraveler.com/2012/11/how-to-sleep-during-a-flight-the-secrets-of-in-flight-slumber/)


http://www.frequentbusinesstraveler.com/wp-content/themes/arthemia-premium/scripts/timthumb.php?src=wp-content/uploads/2012/11/DSC_1138-300x199.jpg&w=200&h=225&zc=1&q=90 (http://www.frequentbusinesstraveler.com/2012/11/how-to-sleep-during-a-flight-the-secrets-of-in-flight-slumber/)

Andrew*Debbie
11-13-2012, 10:48 PM
Along with your good suggestions, we've found Tylenol PM helps. It is mild compared to sleeping pills and doesn't last as long, maybe 4 to 6 hours. It is not available in the UK, so we stock up when we are in the US.

FastMarkA
11-20-2012, 05:48 AM
I have taught myself to sleep on planes...because I have to.

Here's my routine:

* Comfortable Clothes (For me, it's a pair of athletic shorts and a t-shirt. I really don't care how I look to others. Shorts are a must since cabins tend to be warmer rather than cooler.)
* Dream Water (Two shots. Take it about 20 minutes before you want to sleep.)
* Pillows/Blanket (If I'm flying a US carrier, I will bring my own pillow and blanket. I use the airline-supplied blanket as a pad on the seat. I'll also use their pillow. And then I'll use my larger blanket to cover me up. If I'm flying a respectable non-US carrier, I find their bedding is sufficient.
* Eye Mask (I resisted for the longest time because I felt they looked ridiculous, but they do help.)
* Don't Eat the Meal (If you absolutely must get sleep, I have found that not eating the meal is essential. I show up with a little something in my stomach, and that's plenty. Eating at altitude is rough on the body.)

I recently flew HNL-DFW on a red-eye, and I was amused by the looks of some of the older (arguably less-traveled) passengers in the cabin as I prepared my bed to sleep right after takeoff. As soon as we hit 10K feet, I was in bed mode and didn't wake up until I heard the pilot's command to prepare for landing.

tlm999
11-20-2012, 06:08 AM
I have never had any problem sleeping on a flight unless there is a screaming child nearby or one who constantly kicks the back of my seat. I'm usually asleep as soon as the seat-backs can be reclined. It probably has to do with my many years of working on ships and being used to background noise and vibrations.

ard
11-23-2012, 12:57 PM
For me it all depends on what is happening when I arrive. If I need to be functional for a full day before my next sleep cycle, then I try and sleep. Otherwise I jsut occupy myself, read, movies, etc....napping here and there. If I will land and head to a hotel for a full night sleep I purposefully try and stay up. (Essentially looking to become synced to the destination...although trying to jump onto EU time or Tokyo time while still in california SOUNDS nice, it is impossible for me)

I rarely take sleeping pills in the air- occasionally headed to Germany or sydney in F when I needed to work on arrival, and could lie flat and sleep.... otherwise nothing. BUT, they are a MUST for me once I arrive: for 3 days, I take them at bedtime and get 8 hours of un-interrupted sleep. You may still be jet lagged, but at least you arent TIRED! (There is a difference, IMO) People I travel with who go drug-free pay the price by the second/thrid day...

I think this, at least for me, is the biggest factor in getting sync'd.


Any time change under 3,4 horus isnt a big deal, but europe, australia, asia are PITAs from California.

MMME30W
11-23-2012, 04:16 PM
I have taught myself to sleep on planes...because I have to.

Here's my routine:

* Comfortable Clothes (For me, it's a pair of athletic shorts and a t-shirt. I really don't care how I look to others. Shorts are a must since cabins tend to be warmer rather than cooler.)
* Dream Water (Two shots. Take it about 20 minutes before you want to sleep.)
* Pillows/Blanket (If I'm flying a US carrier, I will bring my own pillow and blanket. I use the airline-supplied blanket as a pad on the seat. I'll also use their pillow. And then I'll use my larger blanket to cover me up. If I'm flying a respectable non-US carrier, I find their bedding is sufficient.
* Eye Mask (I resisted for the longest time because I felt they looked ridiculous, but they do help.)
* Don't Eat the Meal (If you absolutely must get sleep, I have found that not eating the meal is essential. I show up with a little something in my stomach, and that's plenty. Eating at altitude is rough on the body.)

I recently flew HNL-DFW on a red-eye, and I was amused by the looks of some of the older (arguably less-traveled) passengers in the cabin as I prepared my bed to sleep right after takeoff. As soon as we hit 10K feet, I was in bed mode and didn't wake up until I heard the pilot's command to prepare for landing.

Good call.

Would only add to avoid alcohol, use ear plugs, and to try and support your head somehow if you end up in cattle.