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View Full Version : How important is matching front and rear tires?


528i
02-03-2005, 12:14 AM
My rear tires (ContiSport2s) are within a millimeter of the wear bars, but the fronts easily have 65% or more tread left.

It seems like a waste to throw the fronts away when they have thousands of miles left, but at the same time.. I don't want to invest any more money into inferior tires when I could get PS2s for about $30 more a tire.

Should I just get PS2s for the rear, leaving the fronts mismatched with the Contis until they wear out? Or, is matching the tires important enough to rebuy the crappy Contis (gasp) for the rear?


Stupid question, I know :p
I didn't see any Tirerack articles or posts here on the subject. :dunno:

kyfdx
02-03-2005, 07:30 AM
My rear tires (ContiSport2s) are within a millimeter of the wear bars, but the fronts easily have 65% or more tread left.

It seems like a waste to throw the fronts away when they have thousands of miles left, but at the same time.. I don't want to invest any more money into inferior tires when I could get PS2s for about $30 more a tire.

Should I just get PS2s for the rear, leaving the fronts mismatched with the Contis until they wear out? Or, is matching the tires important enough to rebuy the crappy Contis (gasp) for the rear?


Stupid question, I know :p
I didn't see any Tirerack articles or posts here on the subject. :dunno:

I like to have matched sets.. but, if you are going to mix, as long as you have them on the same axle, you should be okay....

The rear tires are the most important, when it comes to holding the road in curves.. (not autoxing..just normal driving), so having the new ones on the rear is going to mitigate any problems... If it were the other way around (new tires on the front..old ones on the rear), then I wouldn't do it..

JMHO
kyfdx

Brashland
02-08-2005, 02:14 PM
I had a similar problem and came up with this 'solution' (for lack of a better term).

I really dislike mismatched tires, so I got a 'deal' (again, for lack of a better term) on another set of Yoko's. So my plan is of my original set of tires: put the good ones on the back, and rotate the bad ones to the front. Run the fronts until they're dead. Then rotate the backs to the front and put the new Yoko's on the back. Rotate the tires about every 2,000 miles (Thank you Tire Kingdom unlimited 3 year tire rotation/alignment plan) until all my tires are toast.

Final step: never buy Yokohama's again.

rajrao
02-08-2005, 02:23 PM
on a similar note, would putting higher performance tires up front reduce oversteer to a noticeable extent?

Andre Yew
02-08-2005, 02:40 PM
Higher performance tires up front will increase oversteer. Always put your best tires in the rear.

--Andre

rajrao
02-08-2005, 02:45 PM
sorry, that's what I meant to say, increase oversteer. I think that might be a good thing. I have wondered why nobody puts bigger tires up front on fwd cars to reduce understeer.

kyfdx
02-09-2005, 07:13 AM
sorry, that's what I meant to say, increase oversteer. I think that might be a good thing. I have wondered why nobody puts bigger tires up front on fwd cars to reduce understeer.

There is controllable oversteer... like in a power-slide... and, uncontrollable oversteer.. Like when your back tires break loose suddenly in a high-speed curve...

Old, less grippy tires on the back generally contribute to the latter... not a good thing.. Keep your best tires on the back.. And, if you are intent on tweaking your handling to that extent, buy four new tires...

regards,
kyfdx

Pinecone
02-09-2005, 05:53 PM
Basically putting mismatched tires on a car makes you an instant test driver. Of course you won't know how they will work until you push the car to the limit, which may be ina very not good situation.

Life is too short to die saving a few bucks on tires for a high end car.

528i
02-11-2005, 01:06 AM
Basically putting mismatched tires on a car makes you an instant test driver. Of course you won't know how they will work until you push the car to the limit, which may be ina very not good situation.

Life is too short to die saving a few bucks on tires for a high end car.


Well, actually, I would be spending more money getting the mismatched tires in the back. The PS2s are $60 more for the pair.

Oh, and I don't have a high end car either ;)

Bob330Ci
02-15-2005, 01:48 PM
Basically putting mismatched tires on a car makes you an instant test driver. Of course you won't know how they will work until you push the car to the limit, which may be ina very not good situation.

Life is too short to die saving a few bucks on tires for a high end car.

That makes a whole lot of sense to me.

B.

y2k540
02-16-2005, 07:27 AM
I say that you just buy the PS2's and drive until the fronts are shot and then have matching tires all around. Money doesn't grow on trees and certianly if you have tires that you are even considering keeping on the vehicle for a couple thousand more miles they are most likely much nicer tires than the majority of the world is riding on. As long as you have matched sets on the front axle and the rear axle you won't have any problem. I am assuming that you aren't trying to set any land speed records or testing the limits of adhesion with your eyes closed on rainy days. Just drive the car and in a few months this point will be mute as you will then need front tires and they will all match again.
Just my opinion.
Good Luck