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-   -   Putting my 6 in storage for 6 months!! Please Help! (http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=509894)

SOL's 650i 01-03-2011 08:26 AM

Putting my 6 in storage for 6 months!! Please Help!
 
Like the title says I will be putting my 6 in an indoors, climate controled storage unit for the next 5-6 months due to the fact that I am being deployed over seas again. I am scared to death of encountering problems upon my return from the car just sitting fir so long. One of my friends already suggested having as little fuel as possible in the tank, and also said to add some fuel stabilizer. Im wondering what your guys opinion on that is, and also anything I might need to do to the engine/ oil. YOUR INPUT IS GREATLY APPRECIATED!!

BlaZinMJ3 01-03-2011 08:30 AM

i park my 6er for 5 months every winter in my garage which is not climate controlled. it fires right up without being touched in that time frame. i think you should be alright. give it a good cleaning and change the oil beforehand and you should be good.

pablo645 01-03-2011 08:36 AM

Wow, six months without being driven is hard man. Well first off good luck on your deployment man and please be safe. Since your car will be in a storage facility I would ask them to see if you have the option of connecting a battery tender to the car. They should be able to provide some AC power close to the car so that you can hook up a battery tender to it. Another thing to look at is the tires. I would suggest the car being jacked up and off the suspension if sitting for that long. The tires can become "out of round" by sitting in that one position for long time. If you have been using high octane fuel I would not worry about the gas treatment too much. Cars have started after sitting for years, just use a fuel system cleaner once you get back just to clean out anything that may have settled in the fuel system. This is just my take, other members may have other suggestions as well.

alsaleen 01-03-2011 09:37 AM

My check list for when I store my track bike for the winter.

change the oil

Add sea foam fuel stabaliser

Let run for a couple minutes.

A good thorough wash and wax

Then I put her on stands and pull the wheel, and put wheels on rack (with steel rod going through where the axel goes.)

Cover with either soft sheet or an actual car/bike cover.

The reason for changing oil is so no moisture is in the motor. The fuel stabilize is a must for cold climates, not sure about warmer climates as I've only lived in Wisconsin but it will keep moisture out, some one from a warmer climate can tell you if this is nesessacry. Run the bike/vehicle to cycle new oil and fuel stabilize through the system. The wash down is a must wax optional.
I believe putting vehicles up on jacks for storage is a must to prevent them becoming square. However if you don't have enough stands laying around its up to you, I store my wheels and tires inside because of the cold climate. So if you have 4 stands jack her up and stack the wheels. I always cover the bike I really would with your car as even little bugs waists can eat away at paint.

Don't forget to remember where the keys are!!!!

Ps. If you do decide on. Fuel stabaliser I recommend seafoam over stabil any day.

Thank you for what you do, and stay safe over there.

Sent from my PC36100 using Bimmer App

Tosh.645ci 01-03-2011 09:43 AM

Seafoam stabilizes fuel for long term storage.

coug60 01-03-2011 10:02 AM

#1 Change the oil and filter.

#2 Fill the fuel tank with fresh, premium fuel. Condensation in the tank is a problem in stored vehicles, and it is widely suggested that you fill the tank completely in order to avoid any empty space where water can accumulate. However, the gasoline additives can become "sticky" over time, so it is useful to add a gasoline stabilizer, which is available for lawn mowers and other seasonal yard equipment. In some areas, premium gas does not contain ethanol which can release water when stored for long periods.

#3 Make sure coolant levels are proper.

#4 Inflate the tires to proper pressure. If you are storing for the winter in a cold climate, check the manual for proper pressures.

#5 Clean and wax the car. Be sure to wash under the car to remove any dirt, especially from the the wheel wells. Clean the interior extensively, being especially vigilant about all food scraps and particles; these can attract small animals. Removing the carpets for heated indoor storage will prevent them from becoming musty. Do not use Armor AllŪ or similar products; these contain water, which may become trapped inside the car.

#6 Consider placing a sheet of vapor barrier plastic under the car on the floor if being stored indoors. This will prevent water vapor buildup in an unheated garage, and also makes it very easy to spot fluid leaks when the car is removed from storage.

#7 Open a window slightly if stored indoors, but not enough to allow small animals inside. Put the top up if it's a convertible. Stuff a rag into the air intake and exhaust to prevent animals from nesting, covering this with a metal screen (1/4 inch square screen is useful here). Some suggest using strong-smelling chemicals like soap or mothballs to keep animals away, but these can leave a smell in the car.

#8 Use a battery maintainer if the car will be stored for more than a month. These are basically "smart" battery chargers that only turn on periodically. For short times, a few months, the maintainer can be attached to the battery while still in the car. For extended periods, if you are comfortable with basic mechanics, removing the battery and attaching the maintainer to it outside the car is a advisable. If you choose to do this, be sure to contact the car's manufacturer to ensure that this will not confuse the on-board computers, and that you have written down any needed access codes for devices such as the stereo or alarm.

#9 Place a piece of plastic wrap on the windshield under the wiper blades, to prevent the rubber from sticking to the glass. Better yet, remove the blades completely and store them in a warm place (perhaps beside the battery and carpets). If you remove the blades, be sure to pad the ends of the wiper arms, which can scratch the glass if inadvertently turned on. You can also leave the wipers in place and just wrap them with plain plastic wrap. This can be gently scrubbed from the window if it sticks. Alternatively, if your car has the windshield wiper arms that pop out and away from the windshield, you can store them in the "out" position

#10 If you are comfortable with basic mechanics, remove the spark plugs and spray a small amount of oil into the cylinders to prevent rusting, then insert the plugs again. Special "fogging oil" is available for storing boats, and will work well here. Use of a spark plug anti-seize lubricant on the threads is always advisable, as to prevent the threads from sticking. It will make disassembly easier, when it's time to change the spark plugs.

#11 If the car will be stored for extended periods of time, it is advisable to jack it up on axle stands to avoid flat spots in the tires. "Extended" in this case depends on the type of tires; bias-ply tires need to be jacked up sooner than radials, and high-profile sooner than low-profile. A "classic" car with fat bias-ply tires should be jacked up if stored for more than a month, a modern sports car with low-profile radials should be fine for a winter.

I would jack it for sure and remove the tires.........

#12 Release the parking brake. If the brake is left on, the brake pads can stick to the rotors. Place chocks under the tires to prevent movement, which is even more effective than the brake, anyway.

#13 Place a note to yourself on the steering wheel outlining which optional steps above you carried out (rag in exhaust, rag in intake, carpets removed, battery removed, etc). When returning to the car in the spring, ensure all of these steps are reversed, checking them off as you go down the list. The list should contain every item separately; "rags in openings" may lead to one being left behind.

#14 Lock the doors. It will help in case someone tries to steal something from your car.

#15 Use a car cover only for outdoor storage, or in very dusty locations. Leaving the car "open" indoors allows water vapor to leave the car after humid weather.

Tips

* If you must use a cover, typically only for outdoor storage or very dusty locations, use a cover that is ventilated and allows water vapor to escape. Wicking materials, similar to those used on sporting "technical wear", is widely used in high-end covers.
* It is not uncommon for the brake rotors to develop surface rust during storage. This is most often just a cosmetic problem and can be eliminated during a few driving stops. Heavier surface rust can be burnished off the rotors by performing 15 moderate stops from 35-40 MPH with cooling time in between.
* If the car has been sitting for more than 3 months, change the oil and filter again before driving. Oil breaks down over time, even when the car is stored.
* Before removing the spark plugs, be sure to use compressed air to blow any foreign matter away from the spark plug holes to prevent dirt and other abrasives from entering the combustion chamber.
* When applying anti-seize lubricant on the spark plugs, try to get the Lubricant only on the threads, and not anything else. Also, a little dab of anti-seize lubricant goes a long way; be sure not to apply too much.
* If you have access to the car during the storage period, exercise the brakes and clutch once a month to help prevent sticking of the seals inside the hydraulic components.

Yorgi 01-03-2011 08:54 PM

coug60's list pretty much covers everything.

The essential steps are:
1) Fill the gas tank to the limit just before storing. Prevents oxidization and condensation which can rust the inside of the tank.
2) Add a fuel stabilizer and run the car for a few minutes
3) Disconnect the battery or add a good battery tender (BMW's tender or a CTEK)
4) Change the oil before and after. Old oil is acidic and you don't want it sitting in your engine for an extended period. Contaminates can settle to form sludge. You can use cheap synthetic oil before storage and replace it with BMW-specified synthetic when you get back after driving the car for a few days.
5) Park on boards/tire cradles or put the car on jackstands
6) Do not set the parking brake
7) wash and wax the car

If you do not have access to power for a tender I would disconnect one of the battery terminals.

If you cannot use jackstands I would crank the air pressure in the tires to the max rating written on the sidewall. Then park the car on 2x12 boards or even better Tire Cradles (thick rubber mats) to help prevent flatspots. You should not park directly on asphalt as the oils in it can affect the rubber. On concrete it's the moisture. A full plastic tarp under the car is a good idea. If you use jackstands maybe spray the exposed chrome piston rods on the struts with WD40 to prevent rust.

You can also cover the tail pipes (rag or plastic bag etc) to keep air out of the exhaust and engine. Mice too.

While you are gone don't have someone start the car in storage unless you plan on driving it around for 15 min or more at a time. Otherwise moisture will form in the crankcase and exhaust.

deanpeterson 01-25-2013 10:47 PM

Great Thread
 
I am thinking of getting a 2008 BMW - am only in the country 2 to 3 times per year as I travel for my business. Soooo - do I have to store it as per above OR am I okay if I have my sister fire it up and take it around the block 3 times once a month type thing - does that work? I just don't want to spend $$$$ on a car and then have it rot away - need it work and be enjoyable when in town right!:thumbup:

FredoinSF 01-25-2013 10:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deanpeterson (Post 7339076)
I am thinking of getting a 2008 BMW - am only in the country 2 to 3 times per year as I travel for my business. Soooo - do I have to store it as per above OR am I okay if I have my sister fire it up and take it around the block 3 times once a month type thing - does that work? I just don't want to spend $20K on a car and then have it rot away - need it work and be enjoyable when in town right!:thumbup:

Where are you a 2008 6 series for 20k?

deanpeterson 01-25-2013 10:56 PM

Sorry - its a 3 series - am on wrong forum - storage is the same question though I think. I changed now to put $$$$. Am excited to get a BMW - friend had a couple and sure enjoyed the ride! The look of the BMW too is great - can't mix it up with some other car - don't have to wonder what car is that!

ammobmw 01-27-2013 12:07 AM

I'm here in the STAN and missing my 6r. I have my girl take it for weekly rides so that it does not just sit around. If possible and if you know someone you can trust I would suggest they take it for a spin once in a while, that will avoid you doing most of what we are suggesting you do. Aside from that be prepared to miss your 6r as I do....If I didn't.... I wouldnt be here in the forum thinking about it :(

Mulchman 01-27-2013 03:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ammobmw (Post 7340747)
I'm here in the STAN and missing my 6r. I have my girl take it for weekly rides so that it does not just sit around. If possible and if you know someone you can trust I would suggest they take it for a spin once in a while, that will avoid you doing most of what we are suggesting you do. Aside from that be prepared to miss your 6r as I do....If I didn't.... I wouldnt be here in the forum thinking about it :(

Stay safe my friend. Before you know it, you'll be taking an on-ramp at 65 mph.

Thank you for your service to the country.

:bow:

gregb 01-27-2013 07:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mulchman (Post 7340823)
stay safe my friend. Before you know it, you'll be taking an on-ramp at 65 mph.

Thank you for your service to the country.

:bow:

+1000

HerbP 01-27-2013 07:48 AM

All of the above advice should take care of all of your needs. Before changing the oil for storage, make sure the engine is up to normal operating range. This will help to make sure all moisture in the engine, should burn off. If you put the car on jack stands, The tire should be fine as long as they are not under load.

One last thing would be to put some dryer sheets, in any possible place. This means one on top of each tire, under the hood, several places inside of the car, & the trunk. Rodents do not like the smell of dryer sheets, & this should keep any rodents from moving in & damaging your interior.

Thanks for your service in the armed forces, & providing protection for all!

Good Luck!

ammobmw 01-27-2013 08:46 AM

Thank you guys for your well wishes.


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