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-   -   Code 1223 (http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=648724)

Lapin 229 09-28-2012 08:45 AM

Code 1223
 
I just replaced both temp sending units and I'm still getting a 1223 code reading. Where does the engine temp wiring go? Thanks

Smoothops 11-03-2013 07:04 AM

I'm having the same 1223 code on my 318i and just learned that there are 3 coolant temp sensors on my car. One on the radiator that turns on the auxiliary fan and 2 are on the cylinder head, one (blue) reports to the dashboard gauge and the other one (black) reports to the ECU. The latter may be the one that sets the code, as I have replaced the other two on my car and still have the code. Your car could have a similar configuration. Hope that helps

imae34driver 11-03-2013 01:27 PM

We have the same motor so to speak mines just bigger, and more powetfull. "& Dont you forget it lol"..

Anyways, the dash guage is ran off the CTS on the radiator, there is others in the heads.. For the DME..

Smoothops 11-03-2013 01:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by imae34driver (Post 7935052)
We have the same motor so to speak mines just bigger, and more powetfull. "& Dont you forget it lol"..

Anyways, the dash guage is ran off the CTS on the radiator, there is others in the heads.. For the DME..

I won't forget, but I can wait for the time when yours is not running well, so I can let you eat my dust :bigpimp:
Anyway, in my 318iC, the gauge runs from the forward sensor on the head, the DME runs from the rearward sensor on the head and the sensor on the radiator turns on the auxiliary fan when the coolant gets too hot. I haven't been able to get rid of that 1223 crap because I replaced all of the wrong sensors before running into the right info

Smoothops 01-18-2014 07:03 AM

I finally got around to install the correct temp sensor on the m42. Took the manifold out, replaced the coolant pipe while at it ect. The pervasive engine light is still on, 1223 code again. Resetting the computer by disconnecting the battery does not erase the code, nor does jumping the negative cable of the battery to the positive cable. Worse yet, while re-starting the car, the throttle got stuck and the car started at 3000 RPM after which I got an ABS light, so now I have 2 light on the dashboard. There is a 2002 Firebird that looks better as time goes by.

imae34driver 01-18-2014 07:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Smoothops (Post 8084294)
I finally got around to install the correct temp sensor on the m42. Took the manifold out, replaced the coolant pipe while at it ect. The pervasive engine light is still on, 1223 code again. Resetting the computer by disconnecting the battery does not erase the code, nor does jumping the negative cable of the battery to the positive cable. Worse yet, while re-starting the car, the throttle got stuck and the car started at 3000 RPM after which I got an ABS light, so now I have 2 light on the dashboard. There is a 2002 Firebird that looks better as time goes by.

First, i dont know where you got the idea to jump negative to positive but DONT!


Secondly, are you sure it did reset? If the odometer did not reset then it was not disconnected long enough..

E34ZombieHunter 01-18-2014 08:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by imae34driver (Post 8084318)
First, i dont know where you got the idea to jump negative to positive but DONT!


I think you misunderstood that. You disconnect both negative and positive cables.
Then while both are disconnected touch them together for 10-30seconds.
This drains the capacitors in the computer erasing ALL memory, even "learning" how the aged sensors respond, so it will run rough for a while, until it "re-learns".

I have never seen anyone do this on a BMW, i personally only do it on my Jeeps, and yes it does work. Sometimes the pesky codes do not want to clear, and beats waiting 30min.

Smoothops 01-18-2014 08:21 AM

The idea is in the forums, disconnect the negative, then connect only the negative lead to the positive wire, making sure the negative post of the battery does not come in contact with the jumper. That does clear the EPROM chips on the ECU, same as it does on PC's that are password locked. The shorting occurs without juice in the system, thus no damage is done. It clears all of the codes and data out. I did not check the odometer, but I don't think you can erase the odometer mileage no matter how long it is disconnected. It has been disconnected for the last 2 hours and I'll give it another few hours before I try it again. I have a DME computer replacement looked up, but as the car runs with the existing DME I'm hesitant to spend more money, especially after I opened my DME only to find its contents in pristine condition, no traces of corrosion, humidity or burning from short circuits. All 4 of the temp sensors have been replaced. I found odd that the socket of the temp sensor that feeds the DME showed only one connector when the sensor has 2 prongs. I wander if I'm missing the two little metal pieces that go inside the socket that connects to the sensor. This would cause failure to deliver data to the DME, thus throwing the code. This is just the last of a thousand theories I've concocted in the last 6 months. All of the prior ones have failed to deliver.

Smoothops 01-18-2014 09:33 AM

Just came back from the garage. The good news is that the battery disconnect for 3 hours worked. The engine lights are GONE!!!...... The bad news is that the car is now idling at 3000 RPM's. It was idling at 750 RPM's for the last few months and yesterday after taking the intake manifold out, then back in. I don't think the high horse is due to air leaks. The lower manifold gasket was fine and the upper manifold gaskets were coated with a light dab of Permatex gasket maker. All of the vacuum hoses are in good shape and connected. I gather that the engine has to "learn" to idle, but as I don't like to see it "idling" at 3000 RPM's, I turned it off and came back to the forum for more help.

E34ZombieHunter 01-20-2014 01:18 PM

I will update the thread for
Smoothops from our PM's.

RPM Issue--

Smoothops ordered a new vacuum line to replace one, while temporarily taping the cracked one it had fallen off creating a major vacuum leak, reconnected the line and it is fine.

Code 1223

Smoothops replaced all temp senders but still had the code. Turns out the connector for the oil sensor had gotten switch with one of the temp senders. Reverse the plugs and the issue is resolved.

Smoothops said the only difference is the pins inside the connector.

Glad the issues are resolved
Smoothops.
Always seems to be something simple, we all make mistakes.

Smoothops 01-20-2014 04:22 PM

Indeed Zombie, we get so preoccupied with the complex stuff that it is the simple stuff that kills us. In my case, the connectors for oil temp sensor and the coolant temp sensor were switched. The "squid" on my E36 has a total of 6 connectors, 3 of which are impossible to misconnect, as the wires are cut to their exact location. The other 3 connectors, 2 for coolant temp and one for oil temp are located real close to one another. None of the connectors are color coded or shape coded. When I was re-assembling the first time, I just connected the shorter of the 3 wires to the closest sensor, as the other 3 were cut to specific lenght. I just followed the natural dimensions of the wires and connected them to where they reached most orderly....I WAS WRONG!!! I figured it out because one of the connectors (the one that I had connected to the coolant temp sensor) had a single socket instead of the two that would be required to connect to the two prongs on the sensor. That caught my eye and after digging in the schematics I noticed that the oil temp sensor was shown with one wire on the diagrams. I then peeled the rubber boot on the connector and saw that there was only one wire. A quick look through Ebay showed the oil temp sensor to have just one prong (I could not see mine unless I took it out, which I was not in the mood to do. I felt the one prong with my finger and I connected the one socket connector to the one pronged sensor, switching the 2 socket connector that was there to the coolant temp sensor (where it belonged all along). Throughout the time I was working the battery was disconnected, so all the codes were erased. When I finally finished the reassembly and started the car, it started right up, even though I had lost the fuel pressure from disassembly. No engine lights came on and the car sounded much better, idled smooth and showed no hesitation upon acceleration from idling. I have not taken it for a test ride, as the streets are full of salt, but by the sound of it, I think is all good. I hope my mistake serves to prevent other noobies from having a hard time after taking the intake manifold out. Take home: LABEL ALL CONNECTORS AS THEY COME OUT OF THE SENSORS.

E34ZombieHunter 01-20-2014 04:41 PM

I thought this was your orig thread, i edited my post to have your username.
Again glad it got sorted.
We do overthink things at times because the cars sometimes seem to be over engineered.

Smoothops 01-21-2014 04:57 AM

I agree Zombie, our cars are different, to say the least. I just wander how BMW did not use color or shape coding for the connectors. There are plenty of sensors to get confused. I can imagine on the more complicated cars, must be a workout to do anything in them. I personally like the 7 series, but have been afraid of them. Just recently I missed a deal on one. By the way, what makes the E34 so special, everyone seems to go head over heels about them. I'm new to the BMW scene, so I can use some enlightening.


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