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-   -   Tire pressure sensors (http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=658236)

blake_328XI 11-14-2012 04:53 PM

Tire pressure sensors
 
Hello Guys/Gals,

I recently moved to Montana and we get a great deal of snow. I am wanting to switch my summer wheels (19's) back to my stock wheels(16's) with a little more aggressive tire for winter. I ran into a problem at the tire place (les schwab) saying that the "tire pressure monitoring system" was corroded to the valve stem and couldn't swap the sensors over to my winter wheels.

I went to a second party BMW auto shop and he quoted me $100 each ($400) total for new pressure sensors for my winter wheels.


So I guess I am asking if there is a way around the TSP warning light just for the winter? or am I kind of stuck paying $400 for the sensor & tire stem plus whatever it cost to mount and balance the wheels?

Also is there any cheaper place to buy these sensor other then the dealer?


Thanks for all your help,


Montana Guy
328XI

TXFred 11-14-2012 05:06 PM

They're about $200 cheaper on eBay.

Frederic

blake_328XI 11-14-2012 05:38 PM

Tps
 
Thanks I will look there :)

floydarogers 11-14-2012 06:14 PM

Tirerack has about the cheapest prices. And they will get you the right one. There was a change (frequency of transmitters/receivers) in 2009 or so.

Zooks527 11-15-2012 03:12 AM

+1 on TireRack being able to provide replacements (with warranty and the right frequency) for around $200. The sensors they sold me for my winter tires have been just fine.

While many people have put non-TPMS wheels on their cars for the winter, I believe NHTSA is starting to crack down on the practice, going after installers who put non-TPMS setups onto a TPMS car.

I would think it would work out to your advantage to have 2 sets of wheels, each with its own set of sensors. You save possible wheel scarring / pulling / installing / rebalancing costs to the tune of $100 every 6 months.

CALWATERBOY 11-15-2012 04:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zooks527 (Post 7196114)
While many people have put non-TPMS wheels on their cars for the winter, I believe NHTSA is starting to crack down on the practice, going after installers who put non-TPMS setups onto a TPMS car..


How do they know?

DSXMachina 11-15-2012 04:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CALWATERBOY (Post 7196162)
How do they know?

Undercover agents. Seriously. With all the other problems in this country and the fight over financial resources, TPMS stings get funded.

CALWATERBOY 11-15-2012 08:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DSXMachina (Post 7196167)
Undercover agents. Seriously. With all the other problems in this country and the fight over financial resources, TPMS stings get funded.


There's credence to that - half the population spying on the other half; every current & former govt worker views civilians are people in need of behavior modification.

Do we live in Nazi Germany, or the Soviet Union?

Matrixolution 11-15-2012 08:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CALWATERBOY (Post 7196543)
There's credence to that - half the population spying on the other half; every current & former govt worker views civilians are people in need of behavior modification.

Do we live in Nazi Germany, or the Soviet Union?

I would say Nazi as we are driving German vehicles.:)

pointandgo 11-15-2012 11:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by blake_328XI (Post 7195410)
Hello Guys/Gals,

I recently moved to Montana and we get a great deal of snow. I am wanting to switch my summer wheels (19's) back to my stock wheels(16's) with a little more aggressive tire for winter. I ran into a problem at the tire place (les schwab) saying that the "tire pressure monitoring system" was corroded to the valve stem and couldn't swap the sensors over to my winter wheels.

I went to a second party BMW auto shop and he quoted me $100 each ($400) total for new pressure sensors for my winter wheels.


So I guess I am asking if there is a way around the TSP warning light just for the winter? or am I kind of stuck paying $400 for the sensor & tire stem plus whatever it cost to mount and balance the wheels?

Also is there any cheaper place to buy these sensor other then the dealer?


Thanks for all your help,


Montana Guy
328XI

Several questions are in order here. How old is your car? Are you out of warranty? Do they use salt on the roads in your area? Did the BMW dealer confirm the corrosion?

They do have "rebuild kits" for these TPMS but it's difficult to imagine the extent of corrosion you have. All four would be strange IMO. A TPMS can be ruined by a shop inserting a brass valve core during tire service vs. the required nickel plated valve core (prevents galvanic corrosion).

We rarely hear of TPMS corrosion issues in here.

fun2drive 11-15-2012 03:39 PM

TPMS rebuild kits don't replace the stem they replace most all the other components but that. I have a kit for mine since I figure eventually it will need rebuilt.
Just get 4 new TPMS and have them installed in the snow tires and enjoy life.
Life expectancy is about 8 years on these Li-Ion batteries and once they are shot the TPMS is shot.

pointandgo 11-15-2012 05:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DSXMachina (Post 7196167)
Undercover agents. Seriously. With all the other problems in this country and the fight over financial resources, TPMS stings get funded.

New car dealerships need worry, not an indy shop so much. Just keep an eye out for black full-size SUVs parked around the shop with tinted windows and government plates. :yikes:

pointandgo 11-15-2012 05:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fun2drive (Post 7197294)
TPMS rebuild kits don't replace the stem they replace most all the other components but that. I have a kit for mine since I figure eventually it will need rebuilt.
Just get 4 new TPMS and have them installed in the snow tires and enjoy life.
Life expectancy is about 8 years on these Li-Ion batteries and once they are shot the TPMS is shot.

Based on my calculations and the expected "normal curve" of TPMS battery failures by time in service, I'm projecting that 8 years will be the "mean" time of failure. We'll see more battery failures going in to 2013...it will be the dominant "fest" discussion issue going forward for the next five years! It will make the HPFP issue look like a mere "bump on the road" (as Obama says).

Big opportunities for indy shop owner's...and I expect that some will retire to Jupiter Island in Florida when this is all over...does Tiger own a BMW?

Sportsdad 11-15-2012 06:14 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by CALWATERBOY (Post 7196543)
There's credence to that - half the population spying on the other half; every current & former govt worker views civilians are people in need of behavior modification.

Do we live in Nazi Germany, or the Soviet Union?

I would say closer to the Soviet Union based on text book quotes(and end product, the brainwashed masses) that quote Marx et al in a positive manner in our major universities today. :yikes:

thumper_330 11-17-2012 08:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zooks527 (Post 7196114)
While many people have put non-TPMS wheels on their cars for the winter, I believe NHTSA is starting to crack down on the practice, going after installers who put non-TPMS setups onto a TPMS car.

I think this is a bit misleading to the point of disingenuous.

The NHTSA is not cracking down on the practice of putting non-TPMS wheels on a TPMS car; what they're doing is taking a harder look at those who put run-flat tires without TPMS onto a TPMS car, and dictating that all cars equipped with run-flats are eqiupped with TPMS going forward.

The NHTSA is unable to stop you installing non-TPMS equipped tires on your TPMS car; what they can do is if a run-flat tire without TPMS loses pressure and then fails (i.e. the sidewall gives out either because you're driving too fast or too far) causing any significant damage to your car or others then that would be grounds for a report to your insurance company that they may use to deny a claim.

If you have non-run-flat tires (normal tires) on a TPMS equipped car, then it's reasonable and prudent to assume that you are well aware when your tire goes flat because the car handles like crap. It's no different than in a non-TPMS equipped car at that point.

The NHTSA is not a police force; they are an advisory body only. Even in the event you run run-flats without TPMS then it's actually quite unlikely that you're going to get yourself in particularly hot water because in order for an insurance claim to be denied it would have to be proved that the lack of TPMS caused the issue... i.e. you would have to have a sidewall of a run-flat fail hard and actually be unable to control the car. In either instance you're probably going too fast or shouldn't be driving anyway; I've had a run-flat fail hard (not a BMW) and the likelihood of you losing control is exactly the same as if you had a tire blow out.

No, I'm not an attorney but I am well familiar with the NHTSA and what they can and can't do.

Zooks527 11-17-2012 09:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thumper_330 (Post 7199793)
I think this is a bit misleading to the point of disingenuous.



The NHTSA is unable to stop you installing non-TPMS equipped tires on your TPMS car;

What part of "cracking down on installers" do you consider misleading or disingenuous? I never said anything about them going after individuals, I was clear it was on installers.




Quote:

Originally Posted by thumper_330 (Post 7199793)
The NHTSA is not cracking down on the practice of putting non-TPMS wheels on a TPMS car;

Flat out wrong. Look at case (2) in this link:
http://tires.about.com/od/Tire_Safet...ng-Sensors.htm



Quote:

Originally Posted by thumper_330 (Post 7199793)
The NHTSA is not a police force;

Nope, they're a government agency that provides interpretation of federal codes for police forces and prosecutors to use. Just like the FDA inspectors who can and do walk into my clients' production facilities at their discretion. They can pass out paper, but that's it. If you get them upset enough, though, they can and do return with people carrying guns who will take other steps.

Again, I never said they could come after the owner of the car. I said they're cracking down on installers, and are providing a legal framework for local forces to do so.



Quote:

Originally Posted by thumper_330 (Post 7199793)
No, I'm not an attorney ...

Clearly


Quote:

Originally Posted by thumper_330 (Post 7199793)
... but I am well familiar with the NHTSA and what they can and can't do.

Not nearly as clear

pointandgo 11-17-2012 10:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thumper_330 (Post 7199793)
I think this is a bit misleading to the point of disingenuous.

The NHTSA is not cracking down on the practice of putting non-TPMS wheels on a TPMS car; what they're doing is taking a harder look at those who put run-flat tires without TPMS onto a TPMS car, and dictating that all cars equipped with run-flats are eqiupped with TPMS going forward.

The NHTSA is unable to stop you installing non-TPMS equipped tires on your TPMS car; what they can do is if a run-flat tire without TPMS loses pressure and then fails (i.e. the sidewall gives out either because you're driving too fast or too far) causing any significant damage to your car or others then that would be grounds for a report to your insurance company that they may use to deny a claim.

If you have non-run-flat tires (normal tires) on a TPMS equipped car, then it's reasonable and prudent to assume that you are well aware when your tire goes flat because the car handles like crap. It's no different than in a non-TPMS equipped car at that point.

The NHTSA is not a police force; they are an advisory body only. Even in the event you run run-flats without TPMS then it's actually quite unlikely that you're going to get yourself in particularly hot water because in order for an insurance claim to be denied it would have to be proved that the lack of TPMS caused the issue... i.e. you would have to have a sidewall of a run-flat fail hard and actually be unable to control the car. In either instance you're probably going too fast or shouldn't be driving anyway; I've had a run-flat fail hard (not a BMW) and the likelihood of you losing control is exactly the same as if you had a tire blow out.

No, I'm not an attorney but I am well familiar with the NHTSA and what they can and can't do.

NHTSA has considerable rule making authority as authorized by Congress and they can enforce those rules through the application of stiff civil penalties or through the judicial process if necessary. Their investigative process is similar to the IRS except that it lacks the empathy.

Zooks is correct (link)...making an item subject to motor vehicle safety standards (fmvss) "inoperative" by a shop is highly frowned upon and subject to civil penalties.

Another subject of NHTSA's scrutiny are auto parts subject to fmvss, but not marked with the necessary 'DOT' to indicate they meet federal testing requirements.

Not too many years ago in the L.A. area a distributor of "car boy" aftermarket auto lighting was caught selling non-DOT approved lighting. NHTSA nailed them for about $600,000+.


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