Thread: Eeeewww!
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Old 12-26-2011, 02:13 PM
jarhed1964 jarhed1964 is online now
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Location: Charlotte, NC
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 501
Mein Auto: 97 &99 528i, 05 e60 530i
Quote:
Originally Posted by BikesStillRule View Post
I've been known to use 400 or 600 on used solid lifter buckets on bike engines when installing new cams. I very fine crosshatch on the lifter face helps a little with oil retention, I've never seen them highly polished from the factory, in fact my new BMW lifters have a distinct radial grinding pattern on them.
Ya know, that is a very good point. Just like the cylinder walls. See, little things like this is exactly why I hang out on several BMW forums. It's like having a "second eye".


Quote:
Don't be so humble, just the fact that you're doing what you're doing, puts you in the five percentile.
Well, thanks! I'm just the kind of nut that likes to take things apart and put them back together. It's a sickness, really. I'll never make the mistake of thinking I know it all though, always referring to my manual. I've made plenty mistakes over the years, especially when trying to cut corners. Biggest one was rebuilding an engine in an old Monte Carlo. Didn't thoroughly inspect the camshaft. It had a crack apparently, came apart 10 minutes into firing up the newly rebuilt engine. Gave me enough excuse to go with a Crane Cam and better lifters though.


The three lifters I'm replacing are because I found "pits" in them. Near the top surface above the oil groove when the lifters are situated upside down as if installed. Two have a very small pit, almost looks like it was meant to be there. Like a tiny little hole in the surface. The other one has two small pits pretty close to each other. Those are the only two that have these, so of course they aren't normal. The others also have an almost "polished" edge near the top. Perhaps scuffing those up lightly with 600grit would aid in oil retention also?
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