Thread: windows8?
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Old 10-30-2012, 06:28 PM
PropellerHead PropellerHead is offline
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Originally Posted by AutoUnion View Post
Windows 8 is the next Vista. It sucks. Metro UI blows.
While the adoption rate of Windows 8 may model that of Vista- but who can tell the future?- Windows 8 is a completely different animal than Vista. In fact, the main problem with Vista (pre SP1) was that it was bloated and killed legacy PC's that tried to use it. No drivers were available anywhere for tons of legacy devices like printers and scanners. It was also more than twice the price of Windows 8. Microsoft had a solid enough following that they felt they could rely on their ole cash cow. They've learned that lesson with 8 and are making it so accessible that many will upgrade just 'cause they can and it's so cheap.

Windows 8 is the exact opposite in regard to operating well on legacy systems. As noted in this article where the author installed it with great success on his circa 2009 PC's.
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On every single one of these systems, the performance improvement over Windows 7 is noticeable. Boot up is much, much faster as well as general application and network responsiveness, particularly with the new Internet Explorer 10 browser. And all of my Windows 7-compatible application software is working perfectly.
Secondly, the reason for all of this working so well is a completely redeveloped kernel that is shared across the phone, the tablet (RT), and the Enterprise/Pro versions. Why is that common kernel important? One app can now be written and applied across the multiple platforms. The things that Windows 8 can do with memory have not been seen out of Microsoft before. I have actually seen first hand that the system effectively draws an app down to zero percentage of resources when it is simply minimized or deselected. What does this mean to average Joe? No more 24GB systems. The Great Race for RAM is over. You can do a lot more with a lot less because of these advancements. I predict that we see suffering tech companies who have hung their hat on end users needing more and more memory. This TechNet article talks about that a deep level, but it's a nice reference for noting how different things are under the covers.
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Windows 8 can efficiently write the whole (private) working set of a suspended Modern app to disk in order to gain additional memory when the system detects pressure. This process is analogous to hibernating a specific app, and then resuming it when the user switches back to the app. In this case, Windows 8 takes advantage of the suspend/resume mechanism of Modern apps to empty or re-populate an app's working set.
And then there's the MetroNowCalledModernUI. I think the adoption of this interface will be driven through the tablet and Windows phone markets. I have used a Windows phone as a work device for a few years, now. Of course, my personal choice is not a Windows device, so this is far from an endorsement. Rather, I can suggest that we will see folks who understand the way the Modern UI works and evolve to being comfortable with it in tablet and- eventually- on their touch screen desktop. The interface is not horrible. It's just different.

Finally, where will this mobile adoption come from? Enterprise shops across the world who have been waiting for the promised off-the-shelf secure mobile platform that can finally dig them out of the RIM/BES licensing horror. With TPM and real processing power in tablet form, users will finally be able to hold restricted or heavily regulated data types with security right out of the box and administered from a single, familiar enterprise management console.

Of course, all of that is only if the thing actually works. I've used it for a few months and can get around with a mouse as well as I require. Any reasonable person can work through the uncomfortable changes and find their own peace with it. The nerdy things it does under the covers just have to be enough to motivate us 'upgraders' to adopt the change.

Last edited by PropellerHead; 10-30-2012 at 07:03 PM.
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