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Old 11-05-2012, 04:34 PM
mismaloya mismaloya is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: long island ny
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 456
Mein Auto: 2005 325xiT
I think RFT's are a big advantage for my wife (she'll be driving the X1) for the sole reason she'll never get stranded with a flat on the side of the road when I'm out of town etc.... There's comfort in knowing that. Besides that benefit if I had my choice I'd pass on them. I had a 330 with RFT's that rode very stiff but I understand that they have mastered the RFT/Suspension setup so most of the harshness is gone from the earlier generation. As far as the OP's question, I would pass on the coverage for the sole reason I have had only one issue years ago with a bubble that developed during the first 30 days use on the sidewall of a RFT, and the dealer actually replaced the tire at n/c. Here's some interesting comments on buying Road Hazard insurance from a quick search I did:

The Economics of Tire Warranties

An article from the Washington Post by Terence O'Hara explains the economics of extended warranties and purchase protection plans in general. It is quite fitting for road hazard warranties. He writes:

The decision to buy an extended warranty...defies the recommendations of economists, consumer advocates and product quality experts, who all warn that the plans rarely benefit consumers and are nearly always a waste of money.

'[Extended warranties or purchase protection plans] make no rational sense,' Harvard economist David Cutler said. 'The implied probability [of having an issue with the product] has to be substantially greater than the risk that you can't afford to fix it or replace it. If you're buying a $400 item, for the overwhelming number of consumers that level of spending is not a risk you need to insure under any circumstances.'


In short, road hazard warranties are a waste of money. Don't insure that which you can afford to replace.

Rim Replacement and Repair

Rim replacement is becoming less frequent. With the high cost of aluminum wheels and sport wheel packages, tire insurers have opted to have them repaired. Repair will only be done if the rim does not hold air. What this means is that even if the rim is warped--enough to cause a vibration and even premature tire wear--they won't replace it. Rather, they will send it out to be straightened and repaired.

Rims are replaced only if the damage is so extensive that the new tire, when mounted on the rim, won't hold air. However, even in this case, especially if it's an expensive sport wheel, they may still attempt to repair it.

Repairing rims is a bad option. While some rim repair is acceptable, badly warped or damaged rims will in no way ever be the same.


Article Source: http://*************.com/330737

Numbers Game and Slim Chances

Like all insurance, tire insurance plans are a numbers game. However, this is a game you have a 98% chance of losing. Insider statistics show that the percentage of claims paid out by providers is as low a 2%.


Article Source: http://*************.com/330737
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2005 325xiT Jet Black / Beige - current daily driver
2015 328XGT Luxury Line Black Sapphire/Saddle- on order
2010 528xi Sapphire Black/Black/Dark Poplar - retired
2008 528xi Sapphire Black / Oyster/ 6sp manual - retired
2003 330cic Jet Black / Natural Brown - retired
2001 X-5 3.0 Titanium Siver /Black - retired
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