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Old 12-03-2012, 02:55 PM
robertobaggio20 robertobaggio20 is offline
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Join Date: Oct 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by snowsled7 View Post
Quote:
Originally Posted by robertobaggio20
High mileage tranny oil from multi million dollar brand name oil companies are most certainly not a "mechanic in a bottle" products and there is nothing overtly wrong with mechanic in a bottle situations, if actual mechanics such as Scotty Kilmer are prepared to advocate them in public in for appropriate situations. Obviously, such products will never be equal to a direct repair, but they solve the problem in enough situations to have proven their worth.

So explain to me their worth when you admit in the same paragraph that it is not the same as a "direct repair".
You can ask scotty kilmer. I'm sure he promotes things that are totally useless and have zero benefit in all situations.


Quote:
Originally Posted by snowsled7 View Post

Opinions vary on the validity of oil companies marketing claims. They have been suing each other for lying for decades. Accept the the claims they make at your own risk. Expect that the $100 you drop on trans fluid is most likely not going to fix the car, spend accordingly I say.

I have a mechanic who says that this (new oil causing slippage in an old transmission right after an oil change) might be possible. He has seen it happen. His theory is that the old oil was left in there for way too long before being changed, thickened too significantly, the tranny generated damage in trying to pump thicker oil around, and now cannot function with thinner oil. He feels that its not because of worn clutches that were being compensated for by the thicker old oil.

The point ???? He has noticed this exact same problem before, that of slippage right after an oil change, despite using only oem fluids and filling transmissions properly. His solution for his customers of course was to replace the transmission. He is not a forum member clearly.


Quote:
Originally Posted by snowsled7 View Post


Quote:
And we have seen situations on these forums where people with no prior damage to their transmissions, encountered gear slippage immediately after changing to new oil of the correct rating, and filled correctly according to the manual. Most of them posted here and disappeared without stating how they fixed it, but one german dude who specialised in buying E34s cheap from returning US servicemen and then selling it off at a profit, had this same problem with one of his cars and fixed it by switching to RP's high mileage tranny oil. He was one happy dude. That was over a year ago.

Very compelling evidence
Of course, nothing on these forums is worth anything if it challenges one's superstitions.


Quote:
Originally Posted by snowsled7 View Post

Quote:
Anyway, the classic quick and dirty way to test if your have insufficient tranny fluid is as follows. Shift to D and accelerate to 30 mph and hit the brakes very hard...an e brake. When the car stops fully, release the brakes immediately and do not tap on the accelerator. Watch for how long the car takes to move forward. It should only take 1-3 seconds. If it takes something like 10 seconds, or an inordinately long period of time, you've got too little fluid.

The hard brake causes all the fluid to rush to the front of the transmission. It takes a few seconds to flow back to the back. The tcm will not let the transmission engage until it detects oil at the back of the tranny (or something like that). Its a fail safe. If there is too little oil, there will be nothing left at the back of the tranny when you hit the brakes. If you have enough oil, this will not be a problem.

More very scientific evidence that will tell you exactly nothing, except that your fluid may be REALLY low.
Ermmm.....that was kinda the point here ?
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