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Old 01-16-2013, 11:34 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 20,537
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMW318i_E36 View Post
A friend told me that PBR was just a budget brand and their pads suck
A friend told me the world was gonna end last month. She gave me just as much proof as your friend provided you.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMW318i_E36 View Post
should I get the PBR Deluxe Pads or PBR Metal masters?
The friction codes (and other characteristics) for both are listed in the thread I previously provided. Pick the one you want. It really won't matter all that much either way - practically speaking.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMW318i_E36 View Post
How is ferodo brake fluid Dot 4 fluid?
IMHO, DOT4 is DOT4, unless it's "low viscosity" DOT4. For more details though, I follow this from the E39 side of the house.
- Brake & clutch fluid: Brake & clutch hydraulic fluid (1) & brake bleeding DIYs (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)
Quote:
- Brakes (9/1998 and later): "low viscosity" "high performance" DOT 4 (while the Bentleys clearly specify both "low viscosity DOT 4" on page 340-9 and "high performance DOT4" on page 020-11 and just plain old "DOT 4" on page 020-24, some recommend DOT4 ISO6 (aka Class 6, ISO 4925) low viscosity brake fluid over just regular DOT4, especially in colder climes). While the Bentleys do not specify what viscosity they consider to be "low"). Further inspection reveals a viscosity of 700mm^2 at -104F can be considered "low viscosity". However any good DOT 4 brake fluid can be used; but most recommend ATE Super Blue DOT 4 or "Original ATE SL.6" brake fluid. Many recommend alternating amber and blue colors to ascertain when the flush is complete. [Volume: Most people use about 750 ml or about 3/4 quart to flush the four wheels manually and slightly more than a liter to pressure bleed, depending on technique; so buy at least a liter (or quart) to power flush your entire brake system.] Replacement Interval: Every two (2) years (Bentley page 020-9) starting from date of manufacture. Best to use the pressure method, e.g., Motive pressure bleeder; but the two-man push-and-open method still works.
- Brakes (up to 8/1998): "high performance" DOT 4 (nobody seems to know what "high performance" means in practical terms; but the Bentleys clearly specify "high performance DOT4" on page 020-11 and just plain old "DOT 4" on page 020-24 and again on page 340-9). Replacement Interval: Every two (2) years (Bentley page 020-9) starting from date of manufacture.
- Hydraulic clutch (manual transmission only): Uses the same fluid & reservoir as the brake fluid, Bentley 020-26.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdorman View Post
If they come with shims, use them.
I once asked what the shims do (the answer is in the thread I already referenced).

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdorman View Post
Only lube in the right spots (look it up in Bentley, etc).
It's amazing how dry the Bentley is on brake pads & rotors. See gory details here:
- All BS aside, what are the BMW-recommended brake job "fluids" (1)

Quote:
Originally Posted by rdorman View Post
Don't forget the bed the pads once installed and once the rotors are in place
The bedding procedure is covered, in detail, in the threads I referenced for the OP.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMW318i_E36 View Post
I have no problems buying from BMW dealer either.
Wow. May I have a handout?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TannerT View Post
Cheap stuff will warp easier wear down faster and worse yet you could have a rotor crack.
Rotors almost never warp. Especially on street vehicles. If by warping, you mean pad deposition, that happens all the time. It's caused by the way the owner brakes. No sophistication.
Details here:
- The main causes of vibration while highway driving (0) (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) & while highway braking (1) (2) (3) & why it's never rotor "warp" (1)

Quote:
Originally Posted by BMW318i_E36 View Post
The orginal price of the rotors are between $170-$190, so I am amazed that I can get a rotor like that at fraction of that cost.
Price is meaningless most of the time.
The price you pay is not what 'you' think it's worth - it's the sum total of what every other moron out there thinks it's worth.
And those morons outnumber you a million to one (given that most people are styupid).
That's simple supply and demand stuff from Microeconomics 101.

My advice? Same advice I use for everything else.
Buy the cheapest rotors that meet the desired specifications.
Use your brain, instead of your money, to make decisions.

Good luck. Read the references. You'll do just fine.
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Each repair should invariably add to our knowledge base by the process of inexorable incrementalism.
Your job, in return, is to read the suggested threads, where the best people will always add value to those threads, either by pictures or by descriptions, so the next person with the same problem stands on your shoulders.
See also: E39 Bestlinks & How to easily find what you need

Last edited by bluebee; 01-17-2013 at 05:03 PM.
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