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Old 01-23-2013, 08:16 PM
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captainaudio captainaudio is offline
Worlds Foremost Authority
Location: Upper East Side Manhattan - Boca Raton Florida
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 13,643
Mein Auto: 335i E93 - 750Lix
Quote:
Originally Posted by -=Hot|Ice=- View Post


Did the Enzo actually do a lap? Isn't he scared of wrecking the thing? Ferrari F1 cars? A F430? Where is this? Heaven? I need to treck your way, CA.
Those pictures were taken at Lime Rock Club track days. If you would like to attend one PM me and I can arrange for you to be my guest.

The Enzo did do laps and it is not the most valuable car in the pictures,''

The red Ferrari parked next to my 335i is a 250 GTO.

To put things in perspective that car is worth more than 546 BMW M3s (assuming $75,000 for an M3)

There is a woman who brings her GTO to the Lime Rock Historic Festival every year and I have seen her race it in the vintage races. She and here husband bought the car when it was 2 years old for $14,000. A few months back Robert Cumberford wrote in Automobile Magazine that in the late 60s a dealer in Belgium offered to sell him two of them for $12,000.

Other 250 GTO owners include Ralph Lauren and Nick Mason, with the Pink Floyd star often spotted driving around England in his model, which has the plate '250 GTO'.

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1962 Ferrari 250 GTO for sale at $41 million makes bid for world's most expensive car




Quote:
Just six months ago, a green 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO built for Sir Stirling Moss traded hands for $35 million, making it the most expensive car ever sold. That record may not stand another month if an anonymous American seller gets his asking price of $41 million for his 250 GTO - a sign that the market for Enzo Ferrari's most famous race cars may soon overheat.
Offered for sale by a London broker, there's little public detail about which one of the 39 known GTOs has been put on the market. It's one of 29 Series I GTOs, and one of 22 left-hand-drive versions, and the broker claims it has "great provenence and a very well cared for history by past and current owners," which only means it likely hasn't been burned in a wreck on the track.
When Ferrari built the V-12, 170-mph GTOs to race, with wins at Le Mans and around the world, there was never a thought that the cars would someday turn into near-venerated objects. Even a decade after their heyday, GTOs were often considered worn-out sports cars by collectors. Only in recent years, as the world's wealthy have begun to see collector cars as pieces of art, profit and coolness combined have their prices risen to stratospheric heights. By comparison, the most expensive new car for sale in the world - the Bugatti Veyron, starting at $2 million - seems a downright bargain.
The world of people who keep track of GTOs and their owners will know if and when a buyer puts down the $41 million. If no one bites, the collector car world will know that there's at least a temporary ceiling to demand for the right cars. If someone does pay for it, the question then becomes where the top really is, and who else might be willing to pay tomorrow's price for a 50-year-old Ferrari today.
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Drivers Club at Lime Rock
The Glen Club
International Motor Racing Research Center
BMWCCA
Cayman Club Nor'Easters
Madison Ave. Sports Car Driving and Chowder Society (Only a Vice President)
Sports Car Club of America
Polish Racing Drivers of America (PRDA)
American Mural Project
Simeone Foundation Automotive Museum
Mount Washington Observatory
Society of Automotive Historians

Last edited by captainaudio; 01-23-2013 at 08:52 PM.
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