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E39 (1997 - 2003)
The BMW 5-Series (E39 chassis) was introduced in the United States as a 1997 model year car and lasted until the 2004 when the E60 chassis was released. The United States saw several variations including the 525i, 528i, 530i and 540i. -- View the E39 Wiki

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  #1  
Old 07-29-2010, 02:03 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Recommended parts kits for overhauling cooling, drive belts, CCV/ICV, VANOS, OFH, PSP

This is not asking for a DIY ... it's asking for a recommended parts list for the following 7 systems (interrelated as to the PIA parts that need to be removed).
- Drive belt system recommended parts list kit
- Cooling system recommended parts list kit
- Crankcase ventilation valve (CCV) recommended parts list kit
- Idle control valve (ICV) recommended parts list kit
- Oil filter housing (OFH) leak recommended parts list kit
- Power steering pump (PSP) fluid reservoir recommended parts list kit
- Variable valve timing (VANOS) recommended parts list kit

Rationale: This week, I needed a tow and had to buy parts in a hurry and rip an alternator out in a frenzied rush ... so I already lost my opportunity to get the right parts for a decent overhaul of easy to get to stuff once the alternator, fan, fan, tensioners, pulleys, airbox, etc. were already removed. If I had this list of related parts, I wouldn't have to do the PIA removal twice.

I realize each DIY has a slightly different recommended tools and parts list ... and I realize some "mod" the car (i.e., aluminum radiators, special coolants, special thermostats, aluminum thermostat housings, etc.) but if we keep THIS LIST to just the recommended 1:1 replacement, I feel it will be very helpful to many (including me) in the future.

In fact, if I had that earlier this week, I would have already ordered all my cooling system components, for example, instead of being scared by indecision of not knowing WHAT to get and what brand, and ending up with nothing to show for all that indecision.

EDIT: This is the general recommendation on MIXING jobs:
1. Do a complete cooling system overhaul at ~75K miles
2. Do a complete VANOS seals overhaul at ~75K miles (for the I6)
3. Do a complete belt-drive system overhaul at ~75K miles
4. Do a CCV replacement at ~100K miles

A. It's common to mix the cooling system & belt drive overhauls as the same parts are removed
B. It's common to add power steering hose check/fix & oil filter housing gasket check/fix to the belt-drive overhaul
C. It's common to add a spark-plug replacement with the VANOS seals as the same parts are removed
D. It's common to do the CCV all by itself as it is the more difficult of the three jobs
E. Plan ahead by stocking alternator rebuild parts; but if your alternator unexpectedly goes south, do the entire belt drive system at the same time as the alternator.

Last edited by bluebee; 09-20-2010 at 03:01 PM.
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  #2  
Old 07-29-2010, 02:12 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Here is what I think is the typical recommended special tools and parts list for a drive-belt system overhaul (please correct any errors or omissions):

RECOMMENDED BELT-DRIVE SYSTEM PARTS LIST:
- alternator/ps/wp drive belt (CRP-Contitech)
- A/C compressor drive belt (CRP-Contitech)
- idler roller (INA is OEM, can also get SKF)
- A/C belt tensioner (INA is OEM, can also get SKF or Ruville or Lemfoerder)
- alternator/ps/wp belt tensioner (INA is OEM, can also get SKF, Ruville, or Lemfoerder)
- alternator, 120Amp (Bosch and Valeo are OEM; replace yours with the same as you're taking out)
- viscious fan clutch (Behr is OEM, Sachs is recommended brand, MFC is not recommended)
- ??? anything else ???

TOOLS:
- Dialectric grease for the O-ring on water-cooled alternators only
- 32mm long (~16 inches) thin (~4mm) viscous fan wrench (EBAY, Harbor Freight Tools, Northern Tools, Pelican Parts, Technitool)
- Fan hub bolt counterhold tool, 45mm hole spacing (I6) or 38mm hole spacing (V8) aka fan nut counterhold tool (EBAY, Samsung Tools, Pelican, Technitool)
- 24mm hollow thin socket alternator pulley nut removal tool (only needed if new/rebuilt alternator doesn't have pulley attached)
- Big Fine Hammer, sometimes needed on the fan nut, especially if you don't have the counterhold tool (OSH, Home Depot, ACE)
Note: You can use a screwdriver or make your own counterhold tools for $10 as per the CAD diagrams in this thread.
Note: The BMW 32mm tool (which nobody seems to get, P/N 11 5 040) has an attachment for a torque wrench (but most people don't worry about torque because it's a left-hand thread and the fan spins the other way).
Note: The I6 uses a 45mm spacing tool; old BMW P/N 88.88.6.115.030; new BMW P/N 83.30.0.491.046.
Note: The V8 uses a 38mm spacing tool; old BMW P/N 88.88.6.115.050; new BMW P/N 83.30.0.491.048.
Note: Consider the EBAY fan nut counterhold tool which has the I6 spacing on one end and the V8 spacing on the other.
Note: Edjack implies V8 owners need a recessed counterhold tool for some V8s; so doublecheck here if necessary.
Note: Sometimes the new/rebuilt alternator doesn't come with the pulley so you have to remove yours; most people use a 32mm impact wrench; but BMW sells a specific "hollow thin walled" 24mm socket for this, BMW P/N 12 7 100.
- ??? anything else ???

NOTES:
Note 1: The ONLY way to know if you have mechanical spring or so-called hydraulic piston tensioners is to look; you can even have one of each. No VIN lookup will help you. DO NOT GUESS!
Note 2: You can change from mechanical to hydraulic belt tensioners; but you'll need an additional parts kit.
Note 3: If you plan ahead, you can rebuild the alternator for a fraction of the cost of a remanufactured one; and you'll be sure to have quality bearings.
Note 4: If you are handy, you can make your own fan clutch bolt counterhold tool; just follow the plans outlined in this tool-making DIY.
Note 5: I'm confused but I think the hydraulic tensioners come without the pulley while the mechanical tensioners come with the pulley; I don't know if you can get the pulleys separate from the mechanical tensioners (please correct what I mis-state).

Last edited by bluebee; 08-24-2010 at 01:19 PM.
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  #3  
Old 07-29-2010, 02:13 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Here is what I think is the typical recommended special tools and parts list for a 1:1 cooling system overhaul (please correct any errors or omissions):

FLUIDS:
- 1 gallon BMW antifreeze (~$20/gallon)
- 1 gallon distilled water
- 1 small can of dialectric grease (for electrical connections) (~$5)
Notes:
a. BMW recommends phosphate/amine & nitrite/nitrate free & low silicate or silicate free coolant (e.g., BMW, Valvoline Zerex G-05, or Prestone Extended Life 5/150).
b. You can "mod" the fluid (e.g., Evans NPG+); but let's keep this list mostly mainstream.
c. A complete cooling system flush will use up to 1.5 gallons of coolant and 1.5 of distilled water; but most seem to get away with a gallon somehow.

TOOLS:
- 32mm long & thin viscous fan wrench (EBAY, Harbor Freight Tools, Northern Tools, Pelican Parts, Technitool)
- Fan hub counterhold tool (EBAY, Samsung Tools, Pelican, Technitool)
- Mallet (sometimes needed on the fan nut, especially if you don't have the counterhold tool)
Notes:
a. These tools are recommended, but you can use a screwdriver or make your own counterhold tools for $10 as per the CAD diagrams in this thread.
b. The I6 uses a 45mm spacing counterhold tool; old BMW P/N 88.88.6.115.030; new BMW P/N 83.30.0.491.046 (most people buy EBAY or tool supplier, not BMW).
c. The V8 uses a 38mm spacing counterhold tool; old BMW P/N 88.88.6.115.050; new BMW P/N 83.30.0.491.048 (most people buy EBAY or tool supplier, not BMW).
d. Consider the EBAY fan nut counterhold tool that I have which has the I6 spacing on one end and the V8 spacing on the other.
e. The BMW 32mm tool (which nobody seems to get from BMW, P/N 11 5 040) has an attachment for a torque wrench; but few torque the fan nut anyway.
f. Technically a 1 1/4" wrench is the same size as a 32mm wrench so check your toolbox (it has to be at least 16" long and preferably < 8mm thick); mine is 4mm thick.

REMOVAL OF FAN SHROUD:
- 1 fuel-line type solid hose clamp for 1/4" ID hoses, 25mm to 40mm (~$1), (Oetiker, Norma)
- 1 radiator nipple, PN 17.11.0.419.132 (~$3); if you're not replacing the radiator, this is a recommended spare part as it very often breaks.
Notes:
a. It's common to break the fan shroud seal that surrounds the expansion tank bleeder screw; keep a spare handy (PN 17 11 1 723 580).
b. It's less common to find the two fan shroud 8mm shell, 1mm rivets missing (~$0.25 each); consider a spare set (PN 17 11 1 712 963).
c. The only hose clamp needed for the entire cooling system overhaul is this expansion tank to radiator nipple hose clamp.

EXPANSION TANK & HOSES:
- 1 expansion tank (~60 to $75); (Nissens (if available) or Behr).
- 1 expansion tank cap (~$12) (the cap does NOT come with the new expansion tank).
Optional:
- 1 expansion tank mounting clip (~$2) (this is the clip which goes around the bleeder screw; it often breaks when removing it so keep a spare handy) (Behr, or MTC).
- 2 fuel-line-style solid hose clamps (one for each end of the thin hose at the top of the expansion tank)
Notes:
a. Only the top (stick) half of the level sensor comes the expansion tank; the bottom (electromagnetic) half of the level sensor generally doesn't go bad and can be re-used.
b. Optionally, you can pick up the electromagnetic coolant level sensor (which plugs into the bottom of the expansion tank to mate with the mechanical (stick) level indication).
c. The expansion tank comes with a plastic bleeder screw (~$2) prone to breaking in half; consider replacing with (~$4) brass aftermarket screws (same size as upper hose screw).
d. There are three hoses emanating from the expansion tank (one on the top, two on the bottom); most don't replace them unless they're obviously worn.

RADIATOR & HOSES:
- 1 radiator, ~$150 (manual trans) to $200 (auto trans) (most prefer Nissens over the OES Behr; personally I don't see any reason to reward Behr for making the lousy OEM radiators by buying from them again if you don't have to)
- 1 upper radiator hose, ~$40, (Elaplast or CRP-Contitech but not Uro).
- 1 lower radiator hose, ~$20, (Elaplast or CRP-Contitech).
- 1 temperature sensor ~$20 to $30, a new sensor comes with a new o-ring. (FAE)
- 1 zip tie, about 8 to 10 inches long (ties a plastic wiring harness to the upper radiator hose)
Notes:
a. The new radiator comes with the expansion tank top hose nipple so the nipple part number isn't listed in the REALOEM diagrams.
b. If you're working on the fan shroud, it's common to break this nipple; keep a spare handy (PN 17.11.0.419.132).
c. The upper radiator hose comes with a plastic bleeder screw prone to breaking in half; consider replacing with brass aftermarket screws (same size as expansion tank screw).
d. The lower radiator hose does NOT come with the temperature sensor; so if you re-use your old temp sensor, buy a new 8mmIDx3mm thick O ring (PN 13 62 1 743 299).
e. You can "mod" the radiator by going all metal (e.g., Zionsville); but this post is about the typical recommended replacement parts.
f. The radiator comes with the blue radiator drain plug.

THERMOSTAT & HOSES:
- 1 mechanical (up to and including 1998) (~$100) or electrically heated thermostat (1999-2003) (Wahler) with O-ring gasket (~$2)
- 1 housing for the mechanical thermostat (not needed for the electrically-heated thermostat) with O-ring gasket (~$2)
Notes:
a. You can "mod" the mechanical thermostat housing by going all aluminum; but make sure your mating surfaces are precisely flat.
b. RTV or thermostat gasket/seal for thermostat housing (e.g., Goetze) is not needed nor recommended.
c. The electrically heated thermostat is integral with the plastic housing so you do not need a separate thermostat housing.
d. Some people mod their thermostat by going with a lower temperature and/or by drilling air-bypass holes in the thermostat.

WATER PUMP:
- 1 water pump (~$125 to $150) with o-ring ($3), (lots of debate ... Hepu & Graf are good, GMB is BMW OEM, GEMP/Stewart is high end)
Notes:
a. Optionally you can replace the glass-filled plastic water pump pulley ($25); but most replace only if damaged.
b. Having said that, those who use a BFH and just the 32mm wrench often damage the pulley; so either buy the pulley holder or keep a spare pulley handy before you start the job (lesson learned ... see details below).
b. Optionally you can replace the 4 water pump pulley bolts; but most replace only if damaged.
c. Optionally you can replace the 4 water pump pulley nuts; but most replace only if damaged.
d. There is intense argument about water pumps, mostly about plastic versus metal impellers and long life.

FAN:
- 1 fan clutch ~75 to ~125, (Behr or Fichtel-Sachs, maybe even ACM; but not MTC, Mission Trading Company)
Notes:
a. The viscous fan clutch and the plastic blades are two different parts; most replace the clutch; some replace the fan blades.
b. Optionally replace the fan blades (~$40 to $60); but most replace only if damaged (Behr OEM, Febi-Bilstein, or Meyle, or ACM)

ENGINE BLOCK:
- There are no recommended parts for the engine block; but see optional parts below:
Notes:
- Optionally, on older E39s, if you flush, you may require 1 engine block water drain plug (see cn90 cooling system overhaul DIY)
- Optionally, on older E39s, if you flush, you may require 1 engine block water drain plug washer (see cn90 cooling overhaul DIY)

ODDS & ENDS (most of which were covered in specific sections above):
- Extra radiator nipples (BMW PN 17.11.0.419.132).
- Extra green coolant temperature sensor o-Rings 8mmIDx3mmthick (BMW PN 13.62.1.743.299).
- Extra fan shroud rivets for 8mm holes (BMW PN 17.11.1.712.963).
- Extra brass bleeder screws (aftermarket), ~$4
- Extra fan shroud seal surrounding the expansion tank bleeder screw (PN 17 11 1 723 580).
- Extra hose clamp (fuel filter solid-band type, for ID 1/4")
- Extra 10-inch long zip ties (to secure plastic wiring harness to upper radiator hose)

EXAMPLE:
Here is a real-world example parts list from cn90 back in 2006 for a 1998 528i. Notice the choices made, the need for multiple suppliers, and the prices paid ... (YMMV).

1. From the BMW Dealer:
* Thermostat Plastic Housing (PN 11531740478) $28.00

2.From AutoHauzAZ http://[URL="http://www.autohausaz.com/"]www.Autohausaz.com:[/URL]
* Behr Thermostat 88°C (PN 11531721002) $17.00
- Note: The factory thermostat is 92°C, but I wanted it a bit cooler. Now the temperature gauge sits just a bit LEFT of the 12 o’clock position when warmed up.
* Radiator hoses (upper and lower): $9 and $7
* AC belt (5PK0906) $9
* WP-Alt-PS belt (6PK1560) $13
* Rollers x 2 (PN 11281748131) $17/each
- (for the AC belt and for between the crank and WP pulleys)
* Idler Roller (PN 11281738605) $23/each
(this sits between the WP and alternator pulleys)
* Hydraulic Tensioner (PN 11281717210) $39/each
(for the AC belt)
* Hydraulic Tensioner (PN 11281717188) $50/each
(for the roller between the crank and WP pulleys)
* Coolant Reservoir "Mounting Clip" (PN 17111723580) $2.20/each
* Fan Clutch by "Sachs" (PN 11521719269) $94/each
* Fan Blades by "BMW" (PN 11521712058) $45/each
* Radiator by "Nissens" (PN 17111702969) $173/each
(many people consider the Nissens to be better than the Behr radiator)
Bluebee note: Plus why reward Behr by buying ANOTHER of their radiators to replace the broken one!
* Bypass Hose from Radiator to Reservoir (PN 17111427156) $5.60/each
(This is also known as the reservoir overflow hose, which is located along the top of the radiator going from the reservoir nipple to the radiator nipple)

3. From BMW-Parts Direct http://[URL="http://www.bmw-parts-direct.com/"]www.bmw-parts-direct.com[/URL]
* Coolant Vent Screw (PN 17111712788) $2.80/each
* Reservoir Cap (PN 17111712669) $10.60/each
* Reservoir by OEM (PN 17111723520) $56/each
* Water Pump by "Hepu" (PN 11511740241) $67/each
The pump came with the o-ring. Based on research, the "Hepu" waterpump seems to be a bit better than the "Graf" or "Geba" (Graf and Geba seem to have leakage after 20-30K miles but I am not sure). The Volvo folks love the Hepu water pump so I went with "Hepu".

CORRECTIONS:
Please correct the errors/omissions in this list so we have a good starting point for the next person who needs a cooling system overhaul parts list.

Last edited by bluebee; 09-26-2010 at 07:34 AM.
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  #4  
Old 07-29-2010, 03:51 AM
uncmozo uncmozo is offline
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Radiator cap does not mount on the radiator, it mounts on the expansion tank. The cap does not come with the tank. But the Behr radiator does come with the blue plastic drain plug. Only reason i know is I just bought both this week and am doing the install Sunday.

Jerry
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  #5  
Old 07-29-2010, 04:02 AM
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Fudman Fudman is offline
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Thanx, BlueBee! I haven't done this job yet but I appreciate you collecting all this info. It saves me a LOT of research time! Cooling system is on my to do list as I am almost to 80K.
From what I have read to date, a metal impeller is recommended for the water pump replacement. Available on a coupl of brands. I also recommend going the name brand route, vice saving a few $$ on eBay, for a critical system like cooling. Just not worth the risk vs. reward. For the fan tools, I use a standard 32mm wrench from HF. The full set costs ~$20 on sale and has many large sizes my Craftsman set was missing. Not very thin but it works fine and can take a beating (literally). For the holding tool, I made one using the dimensions in your earlier tool thread from the locking bar to my tool chest (who locks their tool chest?). Not particularly pretty but functional. I read one guy used his garage door opener connecting bar. Now that's innovative!

That's pretty much the limit of my contribution. Thanx again!
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Old 07-29-2010, 07:31 AM
poolman poolman is offline
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Bluebee--take the time to do your Vanos seals while your doing the cooling system--along with the oil filter housing gasket and CCV valve and hose's--while you have the engine down as far as your going--it would be the perfect time to renew all of these area's--you'll be gald ya did
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Old 07-29-2010, 10:44 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by uncmozo View Post
The cap does not come with the tank. But the Behr radiator does come with the blue plastic drain plug.
Thanks Jerry. I updated the post #3 so that the list is updated.

This is the kind of information we can all share what we know and the rest of us (me included) benefit by having a simple 1:1 replacement list to go down.
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Old 07-29-2010, 11:20 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudman View Post
appreciate you collecting all this info. It saves me a LOT of research time!
I don't consider this list anywhere near correct yet. We still need help from everyone to flesh out the questions.

Because the list is still so bad, I couldn't order the right parts when I ordered the alternator parts earlier this week. Now, because of the lack of a good list (and me being scared of being stuck without the right part), I have to rip apart my engine TWICE.

All because we still don't (yet) have the "correct" list of 1:1 replacement recommendations. But we will ... if we work together on it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudman View Post
a metal impeller is recommended for the water pump replacement.
I'm trying to list the most recommended replacement part. That's why I listed the Hepu (composite impeller) that Cam is happy with; yet I also listed the Stewart (metal impeller) which is pricey but many also recommend it (with the OEM GMB in the middle).

For the purpose of this thread, three ranges should suffice as it's supposed to be the most common recommended replacement part and brand.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudman View Post
I use a standard 32mm wrench from HF. The full set costs ~$20 on sale and has many large sizes my Craftsman set was missing.
I had to search to figure out what "HF" was (so I added "HF" to the BMW glossary so others would have it handy). I got my 32mm wrench and 45mm hole-spacing counterhold tool from EBAY, so, I'll list the top three as HF, EBAY, and Northern Tools (with a note with pointers for making your own).

How does that sound for a reasonable recommendation?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudman View Post
That's pretty much the limit of my contribution
No no no. You're not off the hook that easily.

You wrote the book on the CCV. I'm thoroughly confused about my CCV, whether I can tackle it with the hoses all attached but everything else out, and if I need to buy any parts or if we can just clean it.

May I ask you to either respond to the query about the CCV here ... or just post below what parts or tools one needs to do the right thing for their CCV while they are working on the cooling system and/or belt-drive system.
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Old 07-29-2010, 01:00 PM
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Fudman Fudman is offline
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The first question should be: Do you really need to replace the CCV. Some say yes, I say maybe. Partly because I never want to replace parts unless it is really necessary. For instance, I will wait until my oil filter housing actually leaks before replacing the gasket. Why? Because I have better things to do than fix my car. Here are the typical CCV failure modes:

"The CCV also has two failure modes. The most serious failure mode occurs during sub-freezing temperatures and is the result of a mixture of oil mist and condensate (water) combining and freezing the separator solid so it can't do it's job. In the other failure mode the integral diaphragm in the CCV cracks and creates both a vacuum leak and a path for oil vapor to be sucked into the intake manifold and later burned. The result is usually a rough running engine and lots of blue smoke billowing from the exhaust. If this occurs it will most likely be associated with a check engine light (CEL) due to the vacuum leak and misfires that are the result of the contaminated fuel mixture. In a worst case scenario, if sufficient oil is sucked into the manifold the result can be a hydrolocked engine and a very large repair bill. For this reason I believe replacement of the $80 CCV is cheap insurance while you are under the hood to replace the ICV. " Ref: Doug's Domain e36

Being a CA car, you probably don't have the former issue. If you inspect the pipes/hoses, if you find a yellow/white mayo like substance inside, then you have the former problem. If you have the latter issue, you will know it (CEL or smoke in your exhaust). So, unless your diaphragm has failed, replacement may not be needed immediately. But since the total cost for replacement, including the 4 pipes/hoses, is around $140, you may want to do this for the access while everything is out and for peace of mind. It kind of depends on how long your commitment to this car is.

You cannot clean the CCV itself because you cannot open it. It is possible to clean the "mayo" like gunk out of the pipes/hoses but the plastic connectors get brittle over time and typically break when you remove them. Most folks just replace all the hoses. If the diaphragm has failed, it cannot be fixed because you can't access it. So, if this is on your agenda, you should just buy all new parts.

The CCV parts are located on Real.OEM in section 11 15, Engine - Cylinder Head. BMW recommends you should replace the old dipstick tube with the $250+ new BMW "special" dipstick tube. I say whoever says that IS a dipstick. Clean out the tube with compressed air and you're good to go. A new o-ring gasket is all you need there.

In my original DIY post on the CCV, go to post #36 and look at the picture #8, the one with the dipstick tube, wiring box and lower intake boot identified. That view is from the driver side, looking sideways (reference the alternator position). The CCV is hidden directly behind the wiring box, which must be removed to replace the CCV. In post #37, the old CCV is shown in photo #13 and the new one is shown in photo #18.

One thing. The technical difficulty of replacing your CCV is about a 3-4 on a scale of 1- 10. No real skills or experience are needed (look, I DID it! With minimal assistance!). The key is to be methodical and label everything that gets disconnected. However, the PITA factor is an 8-9 due to limited access. Since you have everything out of the way, the PITA factor should be go down to a 2-3. This may be a deciding factor on whether to do this job or not.

These are the parts and tools, taken from that DIY:

Tools
• T-40, T-27 & T-25 Torx
• 6mm, 10mm, & 13mm sockets
• Ratchet -1/4" & 3/8”
• Extension bars, various lengths - 1/4" & 3/8”
• ¼” drive handle
• Small mirror (absolutely necessary!)
• Assorted flat blade screw drivers in different lengths
• Magnetic pick up tool (optional)
• Small blade knife or cutter (for old hoses)
• WD-40

Parts
• 11 61 7 533 400 Pressure Regulating Valve - CCV (insulated)
• 11 61 1 533 398 Vent Pipe (insulated)
• 11 61 7 533 399 Connecting line (insulated)
• 11 61 7 532 629 Vent hose (insulated)
• 11 61 7 504 536 Return Pipe (insulated)
• 11 43 1 740 045 O-Ring, Oil Dip Stick Tube to Oil Pan

Hope this helps. Adding another fairly major task to your growing list of things to do is somewhat daunting but when you get through these jobs, your engine will be extremely reliable.

You'll then get the itch to replace your Vanos seals because you'll want to restore all that available power and torque...

Of course, then you'll want to replace your worn suspension components, because you're now outrunning your suspension...

This is why I try not to fix anything until it is broke. I have spent more $$ at Harbor Freight in the past year than I care to count.
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Old 07-29-2010, 01:17 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudman View Post
Since you have everything out of the way, the PITA factor should be go down to a 2-3.
That is the WHOLE POINT of making this list.

I had to remove the alternator due to an emergency. I had to order parts w/o having the time to do detailed research. Because of that constraint, I could not (successfully anyway) order the right set of cooling system, VANOS, CCV/ICV and OFH parts. But had I this thread with all the recommended parts already debated and decided upon (including the brand when applicable), then I would have ordered it all in one fell swoop.

So, I missed my opportunity ... but this thread is for others (and for me in the future) ... so THEY (and I) don't miss the parts-ordering opportunity again!

NOTE: I would think the Bimmerfest sponsors would be all over this as they could sell a "kit" for each of the four major related overhauls (cooling, drive system, ccv/icv, and vanos).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudman View Post
You cannot clean the CCV ... the plastic connectors ... typically break... Most folks ... replace all the hoses. Clean out the [old dipstick] ...A new o-ring gasket is all you need there.
Good to know. So a new $80 CCV seems like a recommended part on the CCV/ICV overhaul parts list and all the hoses and an O-ring for the oil dipstick tube.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudman View Post
The CCV parts are located on Real.OEM in section 11 15, Engine - Cylinder Head.
IMHO, RealOEM almost never works when you need to know the RECOMMENDED replacement parts & recommended brand. RealOEM works fine if you already know the part you want to replace.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudman View Post
The CCV is hidden directly behind the wiring box, which must be removed to replace the CCV.
I'm sooo confused about WHERE it is ... I'll go look now with your V8 CCV thread and Jason's I6 CCV thread visible and report back later (probably to the alternator thread).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudman View Post
These are the parts and tools, taken from that DIY
And now we get to the meat of the CCV/ICV parts list!

TOOLS FOR CCV REPLACEMENT:
• T-40, T-27 & T-25 Torx
• 6mm, 10mm, & 13mm sockets
• Ratchet -1/4" & 3/8"
• Extension bars, various lengths - 1/4" & 3/8"
• ¼" drive handle
• Small mirror (absolutely necessary!)
• Assorted flat blade screw drivers in different lengths
• Magnetic pick up tool (optional)
• Small blade knife or cutter (for old hoses)
• WD-40

PARTS FOR CCV REPLACEMENT:
• 11 61 7 533 400 Pressure Regulating Valve - CCV (insulated)
• 11 61 1 533 398 Vent Pipe (insulated)
• 11 61 7 533 399 Connecting line (insulated)
• 11 61 7 532 629 Vent hose (insulated)
• 11 61 7 504 536 Return Pipe (insulated)
• 11 43 1 740 045 O-Ring, Oil Dip Stick Tube to Oil Pan

In response to this complete list of parts from Mark at EACTuning for the M54 engine CCV repair: it seems Jason5Driver suggests only:
- CCV cold weather kit
- 2 additional hoses (one is the vent hose but I'm not sure the other hose?)
- dip-stick O-ring
- air distribution piece (is this the same as the return pipe?)

QUESTION:
Can somebody reconcile Fudmans & Mark's complete CCV list with Jason's quickly written but DIFFERENT (shorter) recommended list so we can come to an agreement on the list of CCV parts & tools?

Last edited by bluebee; 07-29-2010 at 02:02 PM.
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  #11  
Old 07-29-2010, 01:25 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poolman View Post
take the time to do your Vanos seals ... and CCV valve and hose's
I don't disagree. It would be nice to list the recommended parts for:
- Drive belt system (see post #2 above)
- Cooling system overhaul (see post #3 above)
- CCV valve & hose overhaul (see post #9 above)
- VANOS seals overhaul (see my ad hoc summary below).

BTW, it takes me longer to decide WHAT to buy than to do the actual job; so it helps to have a good starting point list of recommended parts and brands.

Is this the right list for the VANOS seals?
PLEASE CORRECT! (EDIT: Kindly corrected by Seth (aka Hooray!) here & Doru here).

HIGHLY RECOMMENDED PARTS:
- 1 valve cover gasket
- 1 Double vanos seals repair kit (6-cyl) (BS001) $60/each (beisansystems)
- 1 vanos gasket (11-36-1-433-817) 6.73/each,
- 2 vanos oil hose/pipe washer (32-41-1-093-596) $.25/each
- 15 valve cover bolt grommet (11-12-1-437-395) $1.73/each,

RECOMMENDED PARTS:
- 1 valve cover gasket set (>=09/02 11-12-0-030-496) $34.26/each,
- 4 x engine cover bolt/nut cap (11-12-1-726-089) 3.27/each,

EASILY BROKEN OR LOST OR JUST GOOD TO HAVE AROUND:
- 1 oil fill neck gasket (11-12-7-526-447) 2.29/each
- 2 x vanos piston bolt (11-36-1-748-745) $1.42/each,
- 2x fan shroud rivet (17-11-1-712-963) $.27/each,
- radiator overflow neck (17-11-0-419-132) $1.67/each
- 4x engine cover pad (11-12-1-730-352) $1.98/each
- High-temp Copper RTV sealant for the corners of the valve cover.
- 1 plastic (or better yet, brass) bleed screw which has a habit of disintegrating as the very last step.

TOOLS RECOMMENDED TO DO THE VANOS SEALS:
- 32mm long-handled thin fan clutch nut tool (see details here)
- Fan hub bolt counterhold tool, 45mm (I6) or 38mm (V8) hole spacing
- Exacto thin blade knife would be pefect
- A pick set (small screw driver handles on various metal point shafts)
- scotch brite pad (to smooth out the inevitable scratches on the piston surface, just don't scratch inside the groove when you remove them)
- Torque wrench that works both clockwise and counter clockwise
- way to lift your car, we lifted and put a triple 2x8 block under front wheels, gives you enough access under the car to disconnect the coolant hoses from clips without removing hoses like the Besian instructions suggest (avoids bleeding the coolant system).
- I used the brake cleaner on all the parts / hoses / shields, frame, etc before putting back together, you wont reach alot of those spots ever again!
- blue tape and marker to label each coil as you remove it so you put back on the same cylinder
- remove the VANOS cap and do one piston at a time, put cap back on so you dont mix up pistons (they have a wear set to the cylinder)
- only use one roll of paper towels
- used 6x white terry towels (tossed)
- used two beach size towels to cover fender and engine to prevent scratches, etc and a nice spot to set the tools and instructions
- printed instructions in a 3 ring binder (easy to manage and set on towel above)
- two shop lights, good flashlight (to see nooks)
- pan to catch coolant when you raise the overflow tank too high even though instructions warn you about this
- pan to catch oil that VANOS will spit out when you pull metal covers and plastic caps, I followed instructions and put two white towels over the belts and hoses (see pic), they did their job
- folding table with towel on it to set all the parts in an organized group, in sequence with them coming off, easy to locate and put back on

WHILE YOU'RE THERE:
- Bosch spark plugs (you are right there once the coils are removed)
- ? anything else ?

Last edited by bluebee; 09-20-2010 at 02:46 PM.
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  #12  
Old 07-29-2010, 01:38 PM
Mark@EAC Mark@EAC is offline
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If anyone needs assistance ordering parts I would be glad to help.
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  #13  
Old 07-29-2010, 01:39 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
I found a complete list of parts from Mark at EACTuning for the M54 engine CCV repair:

• 11 61 7 533 400 Pressure Regulating Valve - CCV (insulated)
• 11 61 1 533 398 Vent Pipe (insulated)
• 11 61 7 533 399 Connecting line (insulated)
• 11 61 7 532 629 Vent hose (insulated)
• 11 61 7 504 536 Return Pipe (insulated)
• 11 43 1 740 045 O-Ring, Oil Dip Stick Tube to Oil Pan
WHen I replaced this O-ring on the dipstick tube to oilpan,
reinstalling the tube w/ a new, uncompressed, o ring required immense downward force, which can ONLY be found w/ the intake manifold removed. With intake in place, there's just not enough elbow room to exert the downward force, and so you wind up trying to insert it back into the pan at an angle, and then the o ring gets torn. It's best to leave this o-ring alone.
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Old 07-29-2010, 02:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
That is the WHOLE POINT of making this list.

I had to remove the alternator due to an emergency. I had to order parts w/o having the time to do detailed research. Because of that constraint, I could not (successfully anyway) order the right set of cooling system, VANOS, CCV/ICV and OFH parts. But had I this thread with all the recommended parts already debated and decided upon (including the brand when applicable), then I would have ordered it all in one fell swoop.

So, I missed my opportunity ... but this thread is for others (and for me in the future) ... so THEY (and I) don't miss the parts-ordering opportunity again!

NOTE: I would think the Bimmerfest sponsors would be all over this as they could sell a "kit" for each of the four major related overhauls (cooling, drive system, ccv/icv, and vanos).


Good to know. So a new $80 CCV seems like a recommended part on the CCV/ICV overhaul parts list and all the hoses and an O-ring for the oil dipstick tube.



IMHO, RealOEM almost never works when you need to know the RECOMMENDED replacement parts & recommended brand. RealOEM works fine if you already know the part you want to replace.


I'm sooo confused about WHERE it is ... I'll go look now with your V8 CCV thread and Jason's I6 CCV thread visible and report back later (probably to the alternator thread).


And now we get to the meat of the CCV/ICV parts list!

TOOLS FOR CCV REPLACEMENT:
• T-40, T-27 & T-25 Torx
• 6mm, 10mm, & 13mm sockets
• Ratchet -1/4" & 3/8"
• Extension bars, various lengths - 1/4" & 3/8"
• ¼" drive handle
• Small mirror (absolutely necessary!)
• Assorted flat blade screw drivers in different lengths
• Magnetic pick up tool (optional)
• Small blade knife or cutter (for old hoses)
• WD-40

PARTS FOR CCV REPLACEMENT:
• 11 61 7 533 400 Pressure Regulating Valve - CCV (insulated)
• 11 61 1 533 398 Vent Pipe (insulated)
• 11 61 7 533 399 Connecting line (insulated)
• 11 61 7 532 629 Vent hose (insulated)
• 11 61 7 504 536 Return Pipe (insulated)
• 11 43 1 740 045 O-Ring, Oil Dip Stick Tube to Oil Pan

In response to this complete list of parts from Mark at EACTuning for the M54 engine CCV repair: it seems Jason5Driver suggests only:
- CCV cold weather kit
- 2 additional hoses (one is the vent hose but I'm not sure the other hose?)
- dip-stick O-ring
- air distribution piece (is this the same as the return pipe?)

QUESTION:
Can somebody reconcile Fudmans & Mark's complete CCV list with Jason's quickly written but DIFFERENT (shorter) recommended list so we can come to an agreement on the list of CCV parts & tools?
The parts are the same. Some "cold weather kits" come packaged with some of the hoses/pipes. Others sell them separately from the CCV. Just make sure you get all the parts listed above. The CCV, hoses and pipes all come in regular (uninsulated) or cold weather (insulated) versions. The return pipe is always insulated.

The air distribution piece is separate from the CCV job. This is found in RealOEM section 11 40, Engine, Intake Manifold. Replacement of this part is not required as part of the CCV job.

Real OEM is fine for the CCV parts because there is no aftermarket alternative, to the best of my knowledge. I bought mine from a dealer. Some aftermarket vendors carry them but I believe they are all one and the same. So the BMW part numbers always apply.
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  #15  
Old 07-30-2010, 09:06 AM
poolman poolman is offline
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Your spot on concerning what parts to buy when replacing the Vanos seals--the valve cover gasket along with new rubber washers--the seals of course and the Vanos gasket and silicone sealent--all thats needed beside
whats mentioned is the vanos piston bolts--make sure you have a couple of extra around--no need to be
working and not have whats needed to finish the project.
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Old 07-30-2010, 12:10 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poolman View Post
all thats needed beside whats mentioned is the vanos piston bolts
Thanks poolman for double checking the vanos parts list. The piston bolts are already there (unless I have the wrong ones listed):
- 2 x vanos piston bolt (11-36-1-748-745) $1.42/each,

BTW, I just now added a tools section to the VANOS post #11 above.

Are there any special tools required to do the VANOS?
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  #17  
Old 07-30-2010, 01:31 PM
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Fudman Fudman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
Are there any special tools required to do the VANOS?
The only tool I considered "special" was the fan holding tool and maybe the 32mm wrench, as that's a bit bigger than normal. Everything else was in my tool box.
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  #18  
Old 07-30-2010, 01:50 PM
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doru doru is offline
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Another "special" tool, and I highly recommend it for all jobs, including also the brake job is a an ice cold six pack.
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  #19  
Old 07-30-2010, 06:47 PM
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Fudman Fudman is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doru View Post
Another "special" tool, and I highly recommend it for all jobs, including also the brake job is a an ice cold six pack.
+1, although that technically is not "special".
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  #20  
Old 07-31-2010, 01:37 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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I'm wondering if we missed something here ... so I ask to double check ...

In the parts list for the cooling system overhaul, there is no mention of stocking the problematic Behr OEM nipple (see photo below) that often breaks (it did on me just a few hours ago and all I was doing was removing the fan shroud for the alternator repair).

Research (details here) show the Behr nipple to break often but that it's not a separate part in RealOEM yet it is an available $2 part from AutoHauzAZ yet it seems to be made stronger in the Nissens radiator.

So, I'm a bit confused.

Anyone who has actually done this job could confirm the question below:

QUESTION:
If you're replacing a Behr with a Nissens, do you need to also order the problematic nipple?

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Old 07-31-2010, 02:59 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
If you're replacing a Behr with a Nissens, do you need to also order the problematic nipple?
Nevermind.

I found the answer by cn90 here:
"RE: Nipple PN 17-11-0-419-132. When you buy a new radiator (Behr or Nissens), the nipple is included with it.This is why it is not found in realoem.com."

BTW, I read all of the following before I found out that answer from cn90!
- 5-series DIY radiator nipple
- Can the nipple be replaced separately?
- Can my nipple be fixed
- Snapped off the radiator nipple
- Belt replacement mishap (snapped the nipple off)
- Fixing idler pulley - broke the nipple from the overflow tube to the radiator
- Belts, thermostat, & waterpump DIY (what if you break the nipple)
- etc.
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Old 07-31-2010, 06:37 AM
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Jason5driver Jason5driver is offline
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You can order the nipple separately from the dealer.
Just call the dealer and see if they have one in stock.

However, if your radiator is original, I would replace it.
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Old 07-31-2010, 09:56 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jason5driver View Post
However, if your radiator is original, I would replace it.
I'm going to replace the radiator. And, as most would, I'll do an overhaul at the same time (even though I started just replacing the alternator).

Given that I know NOTHING about cooling systems ...

Last night, until the wee hours of the morning, I read scores of articles on the cooling system overhauls (and made dozens of edits to the parts list above) There is a confusing bevy of conflicting information, and not all of which I remember.

For example, I know now I'm not going to go 'mod' with Evans NPG+ or with Zionsville; and for the hoses, I've seen recommendations for Elaplast or CRP-Contitech but not Uro; and to try to find Goetze for the thermostat gasket. I'm with cn90 in that Hepu is pretty good for the waterpump itself; for the fan clutch, I read to aim for Behr (OEM) or Fichtel-Sachs but not MFC; and for the fan blades, to try OEM, Febi-Bilstein or Meyle.

Unlike many of you guys, I don't have a ready supply of various sizes Hose clamps and all I've read so far says I need a 5/16ths, but I'm not sure where a good listing of the number and sizes of the hose clamps is.

Since I don't know WHICH hose clamps get destroyed and which can be re-used (or which come with the new part) ...

Can you point me to a good listing of the number and sizes of hose clamps necessary for a cooling system overhaul?
(It will help others too as it will go in the parts list above).
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  #24  
Old 07-31-2010, 10:42 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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In the entire E39 search, I couldn't find a specification for just the green O-ring that everyone says fails ... but searching outside the E39 cars, I do find the E46 guys have been active in finding replacements for the $1 O-ring (either made of Viton or Buna N material).

I opened an E39 thread specifically asking someone to MEASURE their new coolant temperature sensor O-ring ... and I'll add the part number I found to the post above for recommended parts for a cooling system overhaul.

I think the O-ring part number is: 13.62.1.743.299



REFERENCES:
- Coolant Temp Sensor O-Ring is a BMW Part Number
- DIY - Temp. sensor coolant leak repair
- E46 Cooling system temperature sensor part number
- Replacing the coolant temperature sensor DIY
- Recommended parts list for a cooling system overhaul
- E46 lower radiator hose coolant temperature sensor
- BrassCraft 0567 replacement for coolant temperature sensor o ring
- BrassCraft and Viton replacements for coolant temperature sensor o-ring
- Coolant temperature sensor o-ring dimensions
- Replace coolant temperature sensor o-ring with viton from macro rubber

Last edited by bluebee; 07-31-2010 at 10:57 PM.
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  #25  
Old 08-01-2010, 01:15 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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I did some more research and will add the following three parts to the recommended parts list for any DIY that requires a fan shroud removal.

- Extra radiator nipples (BMW PN 17.11.0.419.132)
- Extra green coolant temperature sensor O-Rings M8x3 (BMW PN 13.62.1.743.299)
- Extra fan shroud rivets for 8mm holes (BMW PN 17.11.1.712.963)
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