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  #76  
Old 07-16-2012, 06:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AutoUnion View Post

They just updated them with offline maps. Cache cities, counties, countries, etc
http://www.howtogeek.com/?post_type=post&p=94561



Quote:
Google Maps for Android is a great way to find your way around but what if you’re in an area with spotty connectivity? The new Download Map Area caches maps for offline use. While using Google Maps for Android you can now cache maps in up to a 10 mile radius around your current location. No matter where you go (subways, dense city streets, or deep within buildings) you’ll still have access to the maps regardless of how weak your cellular signal is. The cached maps are available on your phone for 30 days (you can delete them prior to the expiration to free up space).
Read more about the new map caching feature as well as the introduction of the Scale and Measure tools at the link below.
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"You know, by the time you become the leader of a country, someone else makes all the decisions. You may find that you can get away with virtual presidents, virtual prime ministers, virtual everything" - Bill Clinton

"Give me control of a nation's money and I care not who makes the laws." -
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  #77  
Old 07-16-2012, 06:16 AM
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I just downloaded the entire Northeast...

Your link is from Google Labs, which was the alpha before they added full offline support to the GMaps.

Last edited by AutoUnion; 07-16-2012 at 06:17 AM.
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  #78  
Old 07-16-2012, 06:28 AM
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Originally Posted by AutoUnion View Post
I just downloaded the entire Northeast...

Your link is from Google Labs, which was the alpha before they added full offline support to the GMaps.
This is great. Now can we download the whole continent?
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"You know, by the time you become the leader of a country, someone else makes all the decisions. You may find that you can get away with virtual presidents, virtual prime ministers, virtual everything" - Bill Clinton

"Give me control of a nation's money and I care not who makes the laws." -
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  #79  
Old 07-16-2012, 11:45 AM
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I feel thread bombed by MCSL... (<-- probably works for RIM's marketing department or something... no, definitely works for RIM!)
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  #80  
Old 07-28-2012, 11:15 PM
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When Two Phones Are Better

As Mary Alice Stephenson bounces between her two smartphones, sending emails with one and tweeting photos with the other, it often leads her to wonder: "Why can't the iPhone and the BlackBerry have a baby?"

Ms. Stephenson, a style and fashion consultant in New York, has tried using each phone alone. She liked the ease of typing on the BlackBerry's keyboard, and she also liked the photo-sharing tools on the all touch-screen iPhone.

A few months ago, she ditched her BlackBerry in favor of the iPhone but quickly became frustrated with the touch-screen keyboard and its autocorrect function. So, despite the hassle, she now always carries both.

Touch-screen smartphones, from Apple Inc. and the likes of Samsung, are the industry leaders, hogging much of the U.S. market share for mobile phones. Most of their users have adapted to the difficulty of sending emails and texts without a physical keyboard and are snapping up the phones because of features such as better Web browsing, camera quality and screen size.

But plenty of people remain attached to BlackBerrys for the ease of emailing and texting via a QWERTY keyboard. Though BlackBerry-maker Research In Motion Ltd. has seen most of its U.S. market share erode over the past two years, many employers still prefer the secure network that BlackBerrys run on.

There are currently 78 million BlackBerry subscribers world-wide, and RIM says that a large majority of Fortune 500 companies issue BlackBerrys to employees.

Instead of ditching one phone or the other, a corps of professional multimedia types have concluded, Why not keep both?

Carrying two phones can be annoying, and there are logistical challenges. First, where to put them? They are unwieldy in pockets and purses.

Then there's the issue of making sure not one but two phones are fully charged, and keeping track of two sets of power cords. There are two phone numbers and two separate carrier plans to manage, which often means different minutes and calling and text rates.

And then there are image concerns. Amanda Slavin, the 26-year-old director of marketing and events for a New York restaurant group, is used to getting skeptical looks when she pulls out her BlackBerry. She quickly heads off any judgment. "Don't worry, I also have an iPhone," she says.

She says people perceive her BlackBerry as outdated, and she agrees with that view-up to a point. "It's just not really practical for anything besides emailing," she says. But her BlackBerry serves up her work email messages very fast, Ms. Slavin says. As important, she can type on it without looking at the keypad. She also likes its instant-messaging feature, known as BBM, as well as its calendar, which syncs with her work PC.

Her iPhone, on the other hand, covers everything else. Ms. Slavin uses it for phone calls, text messages, her personal Gmail account and Web browsing. She also updates her social media, including Facebook, on her iPhone, so she considers it a networking tool. And besides, she says, "the iPhone is so pretty."

The two phones "complement each other really nicely," says Allen Adamson, a managing director at branding firm Landor Associates, New York, and himself a dual iPhone-BlackBerry user.

"Having two devices is often a more powerful solution," Mr. Adamson says. "If you're pounding out a ton of emails, it is very hard to do on an iPhone unless you're very, very fast or a 15-year-old."

Frank Boulben, RIM's newly appointed chief marketing officer, says he is well aware of the two-phone phenomenon, noting that many work-issued BlackBerrys have nonessential applications disabled. Users aren't getting a full BlackBerry experience, he says. "We are going to try and address those individuals differently with BlackBerry 10," he says, referring to RIM's next line of phones, which is expected to launch early next year.

"It would be much more convenient for you to manage all aspects of your personal life and professional life on the same device," Mr. Boulben says, adding that RIM is planning a number of innovations to help users do that.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...450333572.html

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  #81  
Old 07-29-2012, 10:57 PM
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The BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2.0 is awesome. One of the best things about the update is that it makes you feel good about the upcoming BlackBerry 10 smartphones. As far as we can tell, the upcoming BlackBerry 10 smartphones will be a smaller version of the tablet OS. This means that all the awesome games that you've been seeing, as well as the beautiful user interfaces, unified inbox, social integration and more, will all be a part of the next-generation BlackBerrys. There are some great new features in PlayBook OS 2.0, but there are 10 features that stand out above all.

1. BlackBerry Bridge Remote Control
The Remote Control feature with Bridge is amazing and it's going to really come together when you hook up your PlayBook to your TV. Not only does the Remote make watching video and playing music from your TV a breeze, but it also integrates with PowerPoint turning your smartphone into one of those PowerPoint clickers that people usually spend an additional $40 on. Another awesome feature of the Remote is using the BlackBerry keyboard. For those with a Bold 9900, you can now take the power of a BlackBerry keyboard to the PlayBook and bang-out emails at the speed you're used to.

2. Social Integration
It's great to see RIM's implementation of Gist, the Social Address Book, in all the native apps such as Messages, Calendar and Contacts. Whenever you enter a message and you have that user in your Contacts, it's easy to bring up more information about that contact. This brings a great new dynamic to your inbox, allowing you to learn about the people you're messaging. This is where RIM's productivity knowledge begins to shine.

3. Folders
The Folders feature was a big pain when the PlayBook first launched. We heard a lot of complaints from users saying that Folders is a standard feature and it's ridiculous that it wasn't available. Now that folders is here, it's a welcomed feature. Some of the folders I have include: Games, Location, News, Audio, Video, Productivity and more. I can't wait to see the Productivity folder increase in size as RIM releases more advanced APIs for developers to make cool apps with.

4. Message Formatting
It was a little weird that you couldn't type in Bold on a Bold. Perhaps something to do with the rich formatting didn't jive with RIM's vision of data-efficient messaging on the NOC. Now, you can use rich formatting on your PlayBook messages with Bold, Italics and more.

5. Reader Mode
When you're browsing a website, there's a small button in the top left that lets you switch to Reader Mode. This mode puts you in more of an RSS style of reading and makes it easy to take out the text of ad-rich websites. There are a number of ways to read websites on the PlayBook, including apps like Taptu and BlackBerry News, and this is just one more way that reading is enjoyable on the BlackBerry tablet.

6. Print To Go
The Print To Go feature is a cool way of integrating the desktop experience with the PlayBook. When you go to Print a document, you can send it to the PlayBook where you get a digital print version and you can even virtually shred the documents. This allows you to take the document with you on the go and review as well as sort your documents, without having to waste paper.

7. Video Calling
The video calling app on the PlayBook is much improved over the previous version. Now, you can see who is online and call them. Adding contacts is also much easier and it's actually done automatically out of your Address Book.

8. Integrated Android Player
When PlayBook OS 2 launched, there seemed to be a lot of confusion around how Android apps would end up on the PlayBook. The way RIM has done it makes a lot of sense but the way that Android apps can communicate with the PlayBook is incredibly limited for the time being. It's basically impossible to tell if the app you're getting from App World was previously an Android app, and you can't expect all your favorite Android apps to suddenly appear in App World. For now, it seems just very basic apps and games will start appearing in App World as the amount of APIs that the Android app can leverage is really limited. We're hoping that RIM figures out how to take even the most complicated Android apps and port them to the PlayBook. Even basic payment functionality would be great, such as the ability for Android games to default from Google's in-app payment system to App World's without any real work on the part of the developer. Until then, just sit back and watch the apps and games come in.

9. Improved Keyboard
The new virtual keyboard on the PlayBook is a huge improvement over its predecessor. The new keyboard features alphanumeric and symbols on a single page so you can type in your credentials without having to go back and forth between different keyboard styles. Virtual keyboards on BlackBerry devices like the latest Curve have been pretty bunk, and it should be interesting if RIM takes this new style to other devices. It's a winner for sure.

10. Calendar
The new native Calendar on the PlayBook has some great social integration as mentioned above, but it also lets you see what is going on at a glance with busy days being displayed bigger than slow days. The new Calendar also has a wide variety of ways of displaying events and seeing who is attending those events with you. All around, this Calendar makes us really excited for the type of Calendar we'll see on a BlackBerry 10 smartphone.

Honorable Mentions:

Speed – It seems that the PlayBook has improved the speed of the user experience. Swiping windows away as well as being able to click a little 'x' on the window makes browsing the PlayBook faster.

Improved browser – The browser is definitely more powerful on the PlayBook. The reason it's an honorable mention and not a favorite, is because it's sort of always been awesome and while there are definite improvements, it seems like more of a "behind-the-scenes" feature.


The biggest endorsement I can make for PlayBook OS 2.0 is that I am using it again. Every day I leave my iPad at home and I do my browsing, write my emails and read my books on the PlayBook. Yes, I miss a few apps and some of the games, but for many people like me the PlayBook is currently the best tablet option out there.

http://mobilesyrup.com/2012/02/28/bl...for-your-buck/

http://www.blackberrycool.com/2012/0...playbook-os-2/


Last edited by MCSL; 07-29-2012 at 11:21 PM.
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  #82  
Old 07-31-2012, 12:44 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MCSL View Post
The BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2.0 is awesome. One of the best things about the update is that it makes you feel good about the upcoming BlackBerry 10 smartphones. As far as we can tell, the upcoming BlackBerry 10 smartphones will be a smaller version of the tablet OS. This means that all the awesome games that you've been seeing, as well as the beautiful user interfaces, unified inbox, social integration and more, will all be a part of the next-generation BlackBerrys. There are some great new features in PlayBook OS 2.0, but there are 10 features that stand out above all.

1. BlackBerry Bridge Remote Control
The Remote Control feature with Bridge is amazing and it's going to really come together when you hook up your PlayBook to your TV. Not only does the Remote make watching video and playing music from your TV a breeze, but it also integrates with PowerPoint turning your smartphone into one of those PowerPoint clickers that people usually spend an additional $40 on. Another awesome feature of the Remote is using the BlackBerry keyboard. For those with a Bold 9900, you can now take the power of a BlackBerry keyboard to the PlayBook and bang-out emails at the speed you're used to.

2. Social Integration
It's great to see RIM's implementation of Gist, the Social Address Book, in all the native apps such as Messages, Calendar and Contacts. Whenever you enter a message and you have that user in your Contacts, it's easy to bring up more information about that contact. This brings a great new dynamic to your inbox, allowing you to learn about the people you're messaging. This is where RIM's productivity knowledge begins to shine.

3. Folders
The Folders feature was a big pain when the PlayBook first launched. We heard a lot of complaints from users saying that Folders is a standard feature and it's ridiculous that it wasn't available. Now that folders is here, it's a welcomed feature. Some of the folders I have include: Games, Location, News, Audio, Video, Productivity and more. I can't wait to see the Productivity folder increase in size as RIM releases more advanced APIs for developers to make cool apps with.

4. Message Formatting
It was a little weird that you couldn't type in Bold on a Bold. Perhaps something to do with the rich formatting didn't jive with RIM's vision of data-efficient messaging on the NOC. Now, you can use rich formatting on your PlayBook messages with Bold, Italics and more.

5. Reader Mode
When you're browsing a website, there's a small button in the top left that lets you switch to Reader Mode. This mode puts you in more of an RSS style of reading and makes it easy to take out the text of ad-rich websites. There are a number of ways to read websites on the PlayBook, including apps like Taptu and BlackBerry News, and this is just one more way that reading is enjoyable on the BlackBerry tablet.

6. Print To Go
The Print To Go feature is a cool way of integrating the desktop experience with the PlayBook. When you go to Print a document, you can send it to the PlayBook where you get a digital print version and you can even virtually shred the documents. This allows you to take the document with you on the go and review as well as sort your documents, without having to waste paper.

7. Video Calling
The video calling app on the PlayBook is much improved over the previous version. Now, you can see who is online and call them. Adding contacts is also much easier and it's actually done automatically out of your Address Book.

8. Integrated Android Player
When PlayBook OS 2 launched, there seemed to be a lot of confusion around how Android apps would end up on the PlayBook. The way RIM has done it makes a lot of sense but the way that Android apps can communicate with the PlayBook is incredibly limited for the time being. It's basically impossible to tell if the app you're getting from App World was previously an Android app, and you can't expect all your favorite Android apps to suddenly appear in App World. For now, it seems just very basic apps and games will start appearing in App World as the amount of APIs that the Android app can leverage is really limited. We're hoping that RIM figures out how to take even the most complicated Android apps and port them to the PlayBook. Even basic payment functionality would be great, such as the ability for Android games to default from Google's in-app payment system to App World's without any real work on the part of the developer. Until then, just sit back and watch the apps and games come in.

9. Improved Keyboard
The new virtual keyboard on the PlayBook is a huge improvement over its predecessor. The new keyboard features alphanumeric and symbols on a single page so you can type in your credentials without having to go back and forth between different keyboard styles. Virtual keyboards on BlackBerry devices like the latest Curve have been pretty bunk, and it should be interesting if RIM takes this new style to other devices. It's a winner for sure.

10. Calendar
The new native Calendar on the PlayBook has some great social integration as mentioned above, but it also lets you see what is going on at a glance with busy days being displayed bigger than slow days. The new Calendar also has a wide variety of ways of displaying events and seeing who is attending those events with you. All around, this Calendar makes us really excited for the type of Calendar we'll see on a BlackBerry 10 smartphone.

Honorable Mentions:

Speed – It seems that the PlayBook has improved the speed of the user experience. Swiping windows away as well as being able to click a little 'x' on the window makes browsing the PlayBook faster.

Improved browser – The browser is definitely more powerful on the PlayBook. The reason it's an honorable mention and not a favorite, is because it's sort of always been awesome and while there are definite improvements, it seems like more of a "behind-the-scenes" feature.


The biggest endorsement I can make for PlayBook OS 2.0 is that I am using it again. Every day I leave my iPad at home and I do my browsing, write my emails and read my books on the PlayBook. Yes, I miss a few apps and some of the games, but for many people like me the PlayBook is currently the best tablet option out there.

http://mobilesyrup.com/2012/02/28/bl...for-your-buck/

http://www.blackberrycool.com/2012/0...playbook-os-2/



I would rather have an older A500 than a new Playbook. This is true... I just bought one for my GF. She loves the A500 and has now placed her laptop on hold indefinitely.

Playbook should be renamed JokeBook.
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  #83  
Old 07-31-2012, 01:49 PM
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I didn't know this was a RIM marketing thread.

The company is dead. Let's move on
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  #84  
Old 08-03-2012, 10:10 PM
MCSL MCSL is offline
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BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2.0 and BlackBerry Device Service Receive FIPS 140-2 Certification

BlackBerry® PlayBook™ OS 2.0, having made its debut at CES 2012 in Las Vegas, recently joined the family of FIPS 140-2 certified BlackBerry solutions. Along with it, BlackBerry® Device Service, a component of BlackBerry® Mobile Fusion, is now also FIPS 140-2 certified. This is an important certification and a U.S. government computer security standard; many organizations and governments have FIPS 140-2 certification as a requirement for use within their networks.

Why does FIPS 140-2 certification matter?
Certifications in general, and this one in particular, are an indication not only of security and reliability, but also of a process in which independent third parties have provided validation. Beyond government, industries like health care and finance also trust in FIPS 140-2 certifications, as both involve the storing of personal and sensitive information.

Hearing from the Business Analyst community
Today we’ve caught up with Eugene Signorini, Senior Vice President of the Yankee Group’s research team, to chat about these recent certifications of BlackBerry PlayBook OS 2.0 and BlackBerry Device Service. Check out the interview below:

[Biz Blog]: Thanks for joining us today! Why don’t you share a bit of info on your experience and what you focus on in your work?
[Eugene Signorini]: I currently lead Yankee Group’s research team, which is 100% focused on mobility trends and issues. Personally, I focus on enterprise mobility, which includes mobile applications, mobility management, mobile device & OS issues for business, mobile payments, and mobile security. I co-founded Yankee Group’s enterprise mobility research practice in 2002 and have been focused on the topic for more than 10 years.

[Biz Blog]: What is the general significance of certifications like FIPS 140-2? Who does this apply to?
Certifications such as FIPS 140-2 provide an important benchmark for organizations when evaluating security credentials for certain devices and solutions. Essentially, for companies with the most stringent standards for security – whether those are for regulatory or compliance issues, or just standard company practice – benefit from these certifications because it removes uncertainty when approving vendors or suppliers. Knowing something is FIPS certified essentially provides a gold standard, a seal of approval for IT and security organizations. This level of security especially applies to government agencies, financial services firms, and health care, where regulatory and compliance standards are rigid, and require the highest levels of data and information protection.

[Biz Blog]: Is security still an important consideration concerning mobile devices?
Security remains top of mind for IT leaders when it comes to implementing mobility solutions. Yankee Group’s June 2012 Enterprise Mobility IT Decision Maker Survey reveals that security remains the number one obstacle for companies in supporting mobile workers. And mobile security ranks third among all IT priorities across the organization, coming behind only cloud-based services and mobile applications.

[Biz Blog]: What are some of the most prominent security challenges facing businesses today, and how are they reacting?
Most companies are increasingly concerned about managing mobile devices, and securing information on those devices. Specifically, the top three security challenges that we’ve seen enterprises facing are secure network access for mobile workers, mitigating potential loss of data or intellectual property, and prevention of malware across multiple devices and operating systems.

[Biz Blog]: How does security extend beyond simple password protection? Should consumers also be concerned about the security built into their smartphones and tablets?
Password protection is really the baseline level of security for mobile devices – it’s a no brainer and something all organizations should implement. After all, the easiest way to expose sensitive information is by a device falling into the wrong hands. However, organizations are quickly coming to the realization that there is more to security than just basic password enforcement. At the end of the day, it’s about protecting the information on the device both in transit and in static state. Consumers are slower to understand the threats related to information security, but recent events such as compromises to passwords on popular social media and consumer cloud sites raise awareness that consumers need protection as well. I anticipate that as more of these incidents occur, consumers will place a much higher value on device and personal information security.

http://bizblog.blackberry.com/2012/0...certification/

http://advice.cio.com/al_sacco/presi...y_8830_verizon

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  #85  
Old 08-04-2012, 11:59 PM
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BlackBerry PlayBook Hardware

Texas Instruments dual-core OMAP4430 processor - with the two ARM Cortex-A9 MPcores running up to 1GHz each - is a part of the PlayBook's architecture. TI's single-chip WiLinkTM 7.0 solution provides the PlayBook's connectivity capabilities, and our power management solutions are also under the hood. RIM's new BlackBerry Tablet OS, which is built with QNX technology, really makes our dual core processor sing and the resulting user experience is outstanding.

http://e2e.ti.com/blogs_/b/mobile_mo...tm-tablet.aspx

http://www.ti.com/general/docs/wtbu/...ontentId=53247

http://www.edn-europe.com/armversusi...33+Europe.html

http://www.ubmtechinsights.com/teard...book-teardown/







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  #86  
Old 08-19-2012, 10:10 PM
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BlackBerry PlayBook Case Study – Oregon Church

“I love my Playbook and I am a huge advocate for it. Not only in terms of portability, power, multi-tasking but also the price.

Just so you know, a guy at my church has an iPad and he came to me with some problems on the configuration (I spend quite a bit of time at church lately as I'm helping them the ministers and staff get Playbooks - and they love them) and he has been trying to figure it out for weeks. He basically can't send or receive e-mail. So every tablet has issues.

When I look at it the Playbook, it is the best for me and at the current price it is the best out there.

I can read e-books, e-magazines, got free DocstoGo premium, best HTML5 browser The HTML5 test - How well does your browser support HTML5? with Flash to boot, tons of apps rolling in and the hardware specs are awesome. Just listen to the speakers on it vs. the iPad. Then look at the price.

What do the staff at my church think about their Playbooks?”

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  #87  
Old 08-20-2012, 09:14 AM
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Dude, blackberry is dead... it's just a matter of time.
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  #88  
Old 08-20-2012, 11:54 AM
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  #89  
Old 08-20-2012, 09:37 PM
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Dude, blackberry is dead... it's just a matter of time.
Yup.. I'm expecting a yard sale by the end of year or Q1 at latest
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  #90  
Old 08-23-2012, 08:49 AM
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Yes, the iPad isn't always the best option for a tablet, but its still a lovely piece of kit.
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  #91  
Old 09-01-2012, 11:33 PM
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4G LTE BlackBerry PlayBook Carputer Owner

“My car has had two different carputers installed in it over the last 15 years. The 4G LTE PlayBook allows me to remove all that extra equipment.”

http://forums.crackberry.com/blackbe...my-car-742999/

http://www.allaboutmybb.com/

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  #92  
Old 09-02-2012, 08:47 AM
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when does your salary for RIM run out? They should be bankrupt soon
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  #93  
Old 09-02-2012, 09:23 AM
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when does your salary for RIM run out? They should be bankrupt soon
you appear to be fraught with fret over other people using different exobrains than you. are you some sort of mobile OS religious zealot and extremist. you really need to see some a psychiatrist or something.



http://gizmodo.com/5896243/the-fanbo...lovehate-story

[quote]
The Fanboy and the Phone: A Love/Hate Story

In the ‘90's, no nerd-debate was more contentious than that over the "Best" computer operating system. Were you Windows or were you Mac (or Linux)? Rifts formed in communities, hateful epithets were hurled, and friendships were destroyed. It was the geek equivalent of the abortion rights debate.
This war is still being fought, but its once-blazing fires have been reduced to ever-smoldering coals. Why? Because there's something better to fight about, and this time… it's in your pants.
Today, the fight is over phones. Especially smartphones. We defend, with venom, not only our chosen operating system, but also our chosen hardware manufacturer, and even our chosen service provider. Was a similar phone war waged when push-button began supplanting rotary? Probably not? Nor was the battle as fierce when cell phones just made calls and sent text messages. It's the "smart" in our smartphones that seems to have really set this quarrel ablaze, and maybe with good reason.
In 2009, famed Dilbert creator Scott Adams wrote one of my all-time favorite blog entries, wherein he claimed that we are already cyborgs, and that our smartphones are, in essence, a sort of exobrain.
Your regular brain uses your exobrain to outsource part of its memory, and perform other functions, such as GPS navigation, or searching the Internet. If you're anything like me, your exobrain is with you 24-hours a day. It's my only telephone device, and I even sleep next to it because it's my alarm clock.
This really resonated with me. I think about how many phone numbers I had memorized before I had a cell phone. Sure, I wrote many down, but I had dozens stored in my head. Now? Maybe… five? And I don't even know if all of those count, because some are family members who haven't changed their numbers since I was a kid. The last five times I've visited L.A. I haven't looked at a map once. I just paired my phone to my rental car via Bluetooth listened to the turn-by-turn directions. The fact alone that we now have constant access to online dictionaries, encyclopedias, music recognition apps, and everything else that the internet can provide is a very serious augmentation in knowledge and function, even if we don't then store what we learn in our meat-brains.
I don't want to get sidetracked talking about whether this is good or bad for human evolution – that's another question for another day – my point is just how incredibly personal these devices are to us. It's no wonder this debate is hotter than the Windows vs. Mac War of olde. I spend a lot of time with my computer, but I definitely spend a lot more time with my phone. Even if I don't use it as heavily (I don't write long documents or edit tons of video), it's always near me, and therefore I am always connected to that host of information and extra-sensory perception (GPS and communications, for example). While this augmentation is wonderful in many ways, it has also created a level of dependency. If I'd lost my phone while in L.A., I would have had no idea where I was and I would not have known anybody's phone number there. Yes, I realize I could go to an internet café to solve these problems, but you get my point: without access to technology, specifically the internet, I would have been paddleless in a very poopy creek.
Because we have invested so much of ourselves in these devices and rely on them so heavily, we want to believe that we have chosen the "right' one. The "Best" one. We see them as an extension of ourselves, and, at least subconsciously, we know they are extensions of our brains. Naturally, we don't want to think that we have chosen stupid brain-extensions for ourselves. Each of us wants to believe that the exobrain we have selected for our self is the smartest, fastest, most capable, "Best" exobrain there is. This is where "Fanboyism" begins to creep in.
Fanboys (and, of course, Fangirls), those who believe their device/brand/OS/etc. is so clearly the "Best", exhibit brand loyalty at a fever pitch approaching religious zealotry. This is a natural follow, of course, because the very concept of "Best" is entirely subjective, and therefore necessitates belief. There cannot be any one "Best" smartphone any more than there can be one "Best" beer or potato. But these are not mere beers or potatoes, they're our exobrains. They're a part of us (even if they're removable), so it's no wonder that this gets extra personal. We see people with their different exobrains, and they are trying to be faster, smarter, and more capable than our exobrains! There are two divergent paths from here.
Some people say, "Wow, that's a really nice exobrain. I really like my exobrain a lot, but I wish it had that feature." Or they may even say, "Daaaamn that exobrain is awesome! My exobrain is so slow and janky. I totally wish I had your exobrain. I can't wait to upgrade to something like that!" This is the path of, shall we say, most people. These are pretty reasonable thoughts and reactions.
The Fanboy's path looks a lot different. It is filled with defenses and counter-attacks. Upon being shown a feature in someone else's exobrain which does not exist in the Fanboy's exobrain, response is more likely to be along the lines of, "That's stupid. I would never use that." Or they may divert the conversation away from their exobrain's perceived weakness and redirect it toward one of its strengths. "So? Can your exobrain do this?" They are also more likely to defend, attack, flame, and troll in comments, forums, and even status updates, canonizing their own exobrain whilst deriding the exobrains chosen by others.
Well, so what? Other than excessive ****-talking and just generally being super obnoxious, does it do any harm? Possibly.
Innovation is fueled, not merely by competition, but also by customer demand. Generally, the need Fanboys and Fangirls have to believe their exobrain is the "Best" seems to lead them away from being critical enough of their own devices. It's rare to hear a Fanboy admit that there is anything wrong with their device until their device's parent company announces a soon-coming update that will patch that hole (think notifications on iOS or copy/paste on Android). When people demand less, they get less. This sort of consumer complacency leads to corporate complacency. If a company knows, regardless of what they put out, that people will line up for it and buy it, this decreases their motivation to push the envelope (which requires a lot of time and money spent on R&D). They will still have motivation from competing companies, but they know they have a certain number of devotees they can fall back on, and that gives them a sort of a cushion (and it may be a rather large one). When companies kick back on cushions, innovation slows, and consumers lose out.
What is interesting about smartphones is that people who have never before exhibited the characteristics of Fanboyism are sliding down that path. It's not just for geeks anymore! Or, one could argue that because so many people are now carrying cutting-edge technology in their pockets – previously the domain of geeks, more or less exclusively – that now the world is just much geekier? It seems like every other week some friend on Facebook or Twitter posts, "I need a new phone. What should I get?" After just a few comments the thread usually devolves into a morass of iPhone/Android/Windows Phone stroking/bashing. These were once reasonable men and women. Sad. Very sad.
At the end of the day, it's hard to admit your faults and the faults of your exobrain, or acknowledge where others may surpass you. If we can just breathe and get our egos out of the way, however, we can love our own exobrains AND respect the exobrains of others. My primary exobrain is an Android device. I put a lot of weight on customization, and that's one of the reasons I chose it. In general, it's a great device for my needs. That said, I think iPhones are awesome and they have some features I totally covet. Windows Phone 7 has some tasty stuff I wish my phone had, too. Would I ever leave Android? Of course. If Google fails to keep up with the rest of the pack, why wouldn't I? I'm not a stock-holder. I have no more fealty to Google than I do to brands of toenail clippers. Well, I haven't purchased any apps for my toenail clippers… yet.
The point is, there is no "Best" device. Now or ever. It's a myth that companies create and Fanboys/Fangirls buy into. A critical eye and a little humility will ensure not only that you really do have the best device for who you are and your specific needs, it will also motivate companies to strive to produce the most incredible exobrains possible, and that is something I think we all very much want to see.
Image credit: Shutterstock/michaeljung
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Old 09-02-2012, 09:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HW View Post
you appear to be fraught with fret over other people using different exobrains than you. are you some sort of mobile OS religious zealot and extremist. you really need to see some a psychiatrist or something.



http://gizmodo.com/5896243/the-fanbo...lovehate-story
Haha, hardly.

My simple view on this is that anyone who defends RIM/BB now is in need of some serious mental help because that company is as good as done.
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Old 09-03-2012, 09:38 PM
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For business users who supply BlackBerry smartphones or tablets to employees, BlackBerry Balance is the perfect way to keep business and personal content separate.

The application allows IT managers to partition the BlackBerry, so staff are not able to copy and share work data to their personal applications. There is also a big advantage to the employee with BlackBerry Balance - using the app will allow them to still use all the personal apps they want, such as social networking, therefore eliminating the need to carry a second 'personal' device – everyone is a winner. BlackBerry Balance is all about giving businesses peace of mind.

A major headache for CIOs and IT managers is preventing the accidental leakage of data from smartphones and tablet computers when employees use these devices in both their personal and professional lives. RIM is helping managers address this with tools such as BlackBerry® BalanceTMtechnology, which enables businesses to protect their assets while letting employees install their favourite applications. BlackBerry Balance is designed to separate corporate and personal data within the operating system of BlackBerry smartphones and BlackBerry PlayBook tablets. This ensures, for example, that a user can't copy and paste data from a work app into a personal app. This prevents accidental or deliberate sharing of company data through the user's personal email or social media accounts.

Mobile devices can be easily lost or stolen so companies need to take steps to secure data stored on the devices and prevent unauthorised users from accessing corporate networks. Companies need to look for end-to-end solutions, from on-device features to centralised management of end-user handsets and tablets. Some features to look for include the ability to protect corporate data stored on devices using strong encryption methods; IT controls to remotely lock, wipe or de-register devices in the event that they are lost or stolen; and the ability to wirelessly adjust security levels up or down or implement new policies without needing to touch devices.

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Old 09-08-2012, 11:44 PM
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Developers will take a wait and see approach but if even 20% of RIM's 78 million users upgrade to BB10 they will have a larger market share than Windows Phone. Once BB10 gets 2-3 million users the Apps will come (and quickly).

The other developer issue has already been solved. Fixed the SDK and tools to make Apps, fixed the process to create and publish Apps. RIM's done great work here and are second only to Apple for helping developers make money, I mean I doubt they all just make mobile Apps as hobby. Not to mention the $10k incentive if your App doesn't sell you STILL get paid. Who else provides that?

If BB10 is solid and from a hardware / OS side it's sounding promising, App developers would be foolish to get in on the ground floor if this takes off to any degree. Apple's store is over crowded, Android makes zero money as most Apps are pirated. Windows Phone is doing nothing.
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Old 09-16-2012, 10:01 PM
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Join us in San Jose, California for BlackBerry® Jam Americas, a showcase for developers that focuses on the bold, new direction BlackBerry is heading with the upcoming BlackBerry® 10 platform.

When: September 25-27
Where: San Jose Convention Center

BlackBerry® Jam Americas 2012, formerly the BlackBerry Developer Conference, is a showcase for the bold, new direction BlackBerry is heading with the upcoming BlackBerry® 10 platform. The event attracts developers and industry leaders who understand the power of BlackBerry and want to take advantage of building for the platform. Whether you're a Native, Web, or Android™ developer, don't miss this opportunity to explore the powerful, game-changing BlackBerry 10 platform.

Why Attend?

For truly compelling content and learning
• Enjoy a broad technical mix of content, from development basics to deep dive sessions to development time with experts
• Choose from 50 sessions that dig deeper than ever before into the BlackBerry 10 platform and the opportunities for app differentiation, amazing UI and revenue
• Hear from Research In Motion® (RIM®) experts, developer leaders who offer the most comprehensive look at building outstanding BlackBerry 10 apps

For the app development know-how
• Discover how BlackBerry 10 is a truly open platform with support for Native C/C++, HTML5 and Android
• Learn how to engage users with a beautiful UI and amazing user experience from general design sessions to technical sessions on Cascades or BBUI.js
• Get a high level overview of BlackBerry 10 for each platform in engaging keynotes and native and web super sessions
• Try the Native SDK and BlackBerry® WebWorks™ SDK and see how it can work for you - whether you're new to BlackBerry apps, want to go further with BBM™ connections or need to power up the performance of your apps

For an exploration of what's possible
• See how enterprise apps on BlackBerry 10 can change the conversation and take advantage of the BlackBerry 10 Enterprise Architecture
• Learn how to take apps to the market with a profitable app development model that delivers real return on investment
• Understand how to use BlackBerry App World™ to turn millions of app hungry BlackBerry users into loyal, profitable customers
• Connect with fellow developers and BlackBerry partners to compare and collaborate on ideas

http://www.blackberryjamconference.com/americas

I'm Attending BlackBerry Jam Americas 2012

Last edited by MCSL; 09-16-2012 at 10:03 PM.
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  #98  
Old 09-16-2012, 10:51 PM
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http://news.cnet.com/8301-1035_3-575...rry/?ttag=fbwl

Research In Motion is getting no respect from Marissa Mayer.
Yahoo's new CEO informed employees yesterday that they would be getting the new smartphone of their choice from Apple, Samsung, Nokia, or HTC. Through the program, Yahoos will have access to the industry's newest and hottest phones, including the iPhone 5, Samsung Galaxy S3, HTC Evo 4G LTE, and Nokia Lumia 920.
In addition to purchasing the phones, Yahoo will also pay employees' voice and data bills.
But what they won't pay for is a BlackBerry. Once the de rigueur instrument of business communications, RIM's smartphone was left off the list.
While the offer will likely go a long way toward boosting morale at the beleaguered Web pioneer, it's not likely to please employees at RIM, which has been struggling to regain lost market share and sales of its once-popular BlackBerry devices in an industry now ruled by Apple and Android.

Understandably, Mayer is placing her faith in market leaders iOS and Android. But by choosing Windows Phone 8 -- a platform that hasn't even landed in consumers' hands -- over BlackBerry, she is essentially declaring RIM's platform obsolete and dead. And that pretty much reflects consumer opinion; RIM's market share has plummeted from 25 percent in September 2011 to just barely 1 percent in July, according to a recent Chitika study.

Mayer's memo, as published by Business Insider:

We have a very exciting update to share with you today - we are announcing Yahoo! Smart Phones, Smart Fun! As of today, Yahoo is moving off of blackberries as our corporate phones and on to smartphones in 22 countries. A few weeks ago, we said that we would look into smartphone penetration rates globally and take those rates into account when deciding on corporate phones. Ideally, we'd like our employees to have devices similar to our users, so we can think and work as the majority of our users do.

Moving forward, we'll offer you a choice of devices as well as provide monthly plans for the data and phone.

The smartphone choices that we are including in the program are:

* Apple iPhone 5
* Android:
- Samsung Galaxy S3
- HTC One X
- HTC EVO 4G LTE
* Windows Phone 8:
- Nokia Lumia 920


We're getting started right away and taking orders starting now
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  #99  
Old 09-17-2012, 07:31 AM
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Quote:
Mayer's memo, as published by Business Insider:

We have a very exciting update to share with you today - we are announcing Yahoo! Smart Phones, Smart Fun! As of today, Yahoo is moving off of blackberries as our corporate phones and on to smartphones in 22 countries. A few weeks ago, we said that we would look into smartphone penetration rates globally and take those rates into account when deciding on corporate phones. Ideally, we'd like our employees to have devices similar to our users, so we can think and work as the majority of our users do.
Sounds like solid reasoning.
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Old 09-17-2012, 07:58 AM
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Our company, which employs 172,000 employees world wide, currently uses Blackberries but I understand from one of my colleagues in our IT org that they're looking very seriously at getting OFF blackberries in the near future. Mind you, not all 172k have blackberries (lol), only the chosen few (management, Project Management, etc) have use of smart phones.
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