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BMW Diesel Owners / Enthusiasts
Do you own a diesel powered BMW? Maybe a 335d or a BMW x35d? Come and talk about what makes your car great!

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  #1  
Old 11-07-2012, 01:07 AM
Bluenutsnak Bluenutsnak is offline
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Location: Knik,Alaska
 
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Mein Auto: '03 Ram 3500 w/Cummins
Exclamation 335d Questions

I'm new to the forum and need input on the 335d. My daily driver in the winter months here in Alaska is my Ram 3500 DRW 4x4 Quad cab Laramie Sport w/warmed up Cummins power. In the month or two of non snow,I drive my Caprice SS. I'm ready to purchase another car and I want to go with the 335d. I did drive one at the local BMW stealership and was impressed with the torque once the turbo's spooled up. Not quite the get up and go like my truck has,but that's comparing apples to oranges. Has there been injector issues,whether its from dirty fuel,water or any other fuel related problems? How are the dealers/BMW doing with these type of issues? Anybody had their car/SUV start making oil due to faulty injectors washing a cylinder down? Has anyone added extra aftermarket fuel filters to catch the sand and other grim that is in the fuel tanks at gas stations,and did the stealerships void your warranty on the fuel system or the whole car warranty? When I found out that Dodge's OEM filters were rated to something like 6 microns,not enough to protect the expensive injectors. Plus they won't oner the warranty if dirty fuel was the cause. I went ahead and installed an AirDog lift pump and filter system which are rated down to 2 microns. Which Dodge quickly voided my fuel system. Has there been any lift pump/fuel pump issues? Any other problems with the 335d? What kind of fuel mileage can I expect on a nice long hwy cruise at 55-70mph? We have very few spots that is posed above 65mph. I've heard as high as 40 mpg,but I think they are stretching the truth just a tad. I was looking at prices on the '10 and '11 certified cars with mileage as low as 8K miles for $38K and lower. Great prices to start bargaining at. Only problem is I get to drive it up here next spring. I noticed that a majority of the cars are in Black,which I refuse to get another black vehicle,due to it being a pain in the butt keeping clean.
Sorry bought going on so long,I want to make sure I'm covering my bases about getting a dependable car that will still be going strong at 250K-300K miles.
Thanks fellas-Casey
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  #2  
Old 11-07-2012, 04:40 AM
Pierre Louis Pierre Louis is online now
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Mein Auto: 2011 335d Sport
Bluenutsnak, welcome to the forum.

From your comments, I take it you are used to diesel trucks.

The 335d is a different animal. If you stick with brand name pump diesel, you shouldn't have problems with the BMW fuel system, including the filter and fuel pump. Ultra low sulfur diesel has improved consistency as part of the regulations and hasn't been much of an issue with the new high tech diesels in North America. If you have a high percentage of biodiesel, say, over 5%, it would not be recommended by most manufacturers, and don't even think of using home grown used vegetable oil, or WVO.

I would be more concerned with the urea injection (DEF) and exhaust particulate filter (DPF) on these cars, given the way Alaska roads are and their reputation to tear into the undersides of cars and trucks. Having no spare tire is another issue with the run-flat tires for you, as you may want to change over to regular tires with a spare and a jack kit.

As far as reliability similar to the old diesel trucks, it remains to be seen if the modern motors with their delicate turbo control systems and high pressure direct fuel injectors will last 300,000 miles without major problems, but if you take care of machinery it might take care of you.

I can't imagine you not liking how the 335d performs, even comparing it to a diesel truck. The BMW will put a smile on your face every time.

PL
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  #3  
Old 11-07-2012, 05:17 AM
TDIwyse TDIwyse is offline
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You might find some of the stuff in this thread interesting.

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=461450
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  #4  
Old 11-07-2012, 05:37 AM
TDIwyse TDIwyse is offline
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http://www.bmwtradeparts.co.uk/PDF/W...uelFilters.pdf

Claims ~4um at 99.5% filtration. And claims water protection, although there's no way to drain the water out.
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  #5  
Old 11-07-2012, 07:04 AM
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floydarogers floydarogers is offline
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Location: Renton, WA
 
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Mein Auto: 335d, 328d, Toyota T100
Welcome. FYI, a bone-stock 335d will do a quarter-mile in 14.2. Launch is problematical; a LSD would help a lot.

Although 40 mpg is possible and sometimes attainable, I think you would be more likely to see mileage in the 34 mpg highway range (that's what I get here in Seattle going over the passes or down to Portland.) Lower speeds (under 60) definitely help with mileage.

I've been reading pretty much everything here in the last 3 years; I think there have only been 3-4 injector problems and most of them have been adaptation problems rather than failed injectors. But we're not in AK.
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  #6  
Old 11-07-2012, 07:29 AM
ChasR ChasR is offline
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Mein Auto: 335d, E28 M5, Clubman S
My fuel mileage ranges from a low of 29.89 (daily commute at about 45 mph average speed) to a high of 36.36 (trip with cruise control set at 80 mph). The average of all tanks is 32.9 mpg. 40mpg probably isn't out of the question if you stay in that 55 to 70 mph range on a trip. Cold starts sink the mileage a bit.
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  #7  
Old 11-08-2012, 06:14 PM
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Flyingman Flyingman is offline
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Nutsack,

I don't think I would recommend the 335d for Alaska. I assume your roads can be pretty rough due to the cold/winter climate, i.e. lots of potholes, cracks, etc...

That would be really rough on a car like the 335d.

It also sounds like your diesel quality up there could be a bit problematic as well. Also not a good thing for the 335d. May be a bit too refined for your area.

Just my opinion. I'd stick with a truck for sure.

Snipe, you have any words for this guy?
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  #8  
Old 11-08-2012, 08:40 PM
Pierre Louis Pierre Louis is online now
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From: How good is the Alaska Highway?
Quote:
The Alaska Highway, despite its reputation, is not terrible. It's a fast, scenic and wildlife-filled adventure with plenty of businesses along the way to make travel easier.

The highway surface is almost all asphalt. The exceptions are some construction zones, and these are gravel.

The 1,422-mile Alaska Highway starts in Dawson Creek, small city in northeastern British Columbia. It runs about 1,220 miles through British Columbia and Yukon Territory to the Alaska Border and for another 200 miles from the border to Delta Junction, Alaska. (Sometimes the 95 miles of the Richardson Highway between Delta Junction and Fairbanks are considered part of the Alaska Highway.)

The Alaska Highway is only part of the trip between the Lower 48 and Alaska. To reach Dawson Creek, drivers from the United States generally motor up from Washington state through British Columbia, or from Montana through Alberta.

Including the Alaska Highway, the distance to the Yukon-Alaska border is 1,950 miles from the Montana-Alberta border and 1,900 miles from the Washington-British Columbia border.

Speed: The Alaska Highway in the 1940s and 1950s was a nightmare of mud and potholes. Now it's possible to drive everything from a four-wheel-drive pickup to an RV to a low-slung sedan up and down the asphalt road at 55 or 65 mph, depending on the local limit. A steady driver can expect to average 50 miles an hour over the course of a day.

Construction: Some places are under construction, as might be expected on a road 1,600 miles long, and some places are packed gravel instead of asphalt. Chipped and cracked windshields are possible. Check the road conditions in Alaska, British Columbia and Yukon Territory.

Weather: The Alaska Highway is a lot friendlier in the summer than in the winter, when temperatures fall below -50 and blowing snow can make the road hazardous. Summertime temperatures may reach the 70s, but late summer rains can also make the road seem pretty long.

Wildlife: Drivers can reasonably expect to see black and brown bears, bison, caribou, sheep and moose, plus many species of migratory and resident birds.

Gas: Drivers shouldn't worry about running out of gasoline or diesel fuel; the longest stretch without a gas station is about 100 miles between Whitehorse and Haines Junction in Yukon Territory.

Sleep: Accommodations, from frequent campgrounds to nice lodges, are open during the warm months and sometimes in the winter.
Sounds like avoiding the gravel roads would be good, as well as perhaps getting a 335d without the sport package! I guess it depends what others are doing with their cars: any Corvettes? Mercedes? other BMWs?

PL
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  #9  
Old 11-09-2012, 05:36 AM
BMWTurboDzl BMWTurboDzl is online now
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Mein Auto: 335D, 435i (Ordered)
No place to install an after market fuel filter. Personally with what you said in terms of roads and more importantly fuel quality I would avoid the 335d. For reference it uses the Bosch CP3 injection system or so I've read.

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  #10  
Old 11-09-2012, 06:21 AM
Pierre Louis Pierre Louis is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMWTurboDzl View Post
No place to install an after market fuel filter. Personally with what you said in terms of roads and more importantly fuel quality I would avoid the 335d. For reference it uses the Bosch CP3 injection system or so I've read.

Sent from my MB525 using Bimmer App
Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) is now required even in rural Alaska since 2010. The required standard is ASTM D 975 which also has better fuel cleanliness:

Quote:
ASTM D 975 limits the ash content of most diesel fuels to a maximum of 100 ppm.
(Inorganic particles and oil-soluble, metallo-organic compounds both contribute to the
ash content; but, only inorganic particles will cause wear.) The U.S. government has a
tighter specification of 10 mg/L (approximately 12 ppm) for all particulate matter. However,
neither specification addresses particle size. While most fuel filters recommended by engine
manufacturers have a nominal pore size of 10 microns,6 studies by the Southwest Research
Institute reveal that the critical particle size for initiating significant abrasive wear in rotary
injection fuel pumps and in high-pressure fuel injection systems is from six to seven microns.
6 1 micron = 1 micrometer = 10-6 meter
However, as engine designs to reduce emissions result in higher fuel rail and injector pressures,
the tighter clearances will have less tolerance for solids and impurities in the fuel.
Consequently, some engine manufacturers are now specifying filters with pore size as low
as two microns.
If you think he needs a secondary fuel filter for Alaska, then we all do, since all US on-road diesel fuel has the same maximum particulate contaminant percentages now since 2010. Unless our friend is using off-road diesel, this should not cause a problem with his fuel pump.

Unless of course you think unacceptable wear occurs from winter diesel having higher kerosene content, which I imagine would be more common in Alaska even during "Summer" months. The ASTM standard is specific for lubricity also, so it should not be as bad as before ULSD.

ULSD has improved fuel consistency and cleanliness. This is why the US can now export it in the international market, as it is acceptable for other countries' standards, and why its price is higher than gasoline, which Europe exports to us.

PL
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  #11  
Old 11-09-2012, 08:55 AM
BMWTurboDzl BMWTurboDzl is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre Louis View Post
Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) is now required even in rural Alaska since 2010. The required standard is ASTM D 975 which also has better fuel cleanliness:



If you think he needs a secondary fuel filter for Alaska, then we all do, since all US on-road diesel fuel has the same maximum particulate contaminant percentages now since 2010. Unless our friend is using off-road diesel, this should not cause a problem with his fuel pump.

Unless of course you think unacceptable wear occurs from winter diesel having higher kerosene content, which I imagine would be more common in Alaska even during "Summer" months. The ASTM standard is specific for lubricity also, so it should not be as bad as before ULSD.

ULSD has improved fuel consistency and cleanliness. This is why the US can now export it in the international market, as it is acceptable for other countries' standards, and why its price is higher than gasoline, which Europe exports to us.

PL
I understand all of that but my take on the OP is that the local stations are not proactive when it comes down to tank maintenance.

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  #12  
Old 11-09-2012, 10:56 AM
TDIwyse TDIwyse is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMWTurboDzl View Post
No place to install an after market fuel filter.
The link above shows a 335d with an additional water separating, drainable fuel filtration system installed.
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  #13  
Old 11-09-2012, 12:25 PM
Pierre Louis Pierre Louis is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TDIwyse View Post
The link above shows a 335d with an additional water separating, drainable fuel filtration system installed.
Do you mean the link in your previous post? http://www.bmwtradeparts.co.uk/PDF/W...uelFilters.pdf It shows the standard fuel filter setup, which appears pretty darn good already, down to 4 microns.

PL
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  #14  
Old 11-09-2012, 03:25 PM
TDIwyse TDIwyse is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pierre Louis View Post
Do you mean the link in your previous post? http://www.bmwtradeparts.co.uk/PDF/W...uelFilters.pdf It shows the standard fuel filter setup, which appears pretty darn good already, down to 4 microns.

PL
Post #3 above.
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  #15  
Old 11-11-2012, 07:54 PM
DnA Diesel DnA Diesel is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BMWTurboDzl View Post
No place to install an after market fuel filter. Personally with what you said in terms of roads and more importantly fuel quality I would avoid the 335d. For reference it uses the Bosch CP3 injection system or so I've read.

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For reference, the Cummins 6.7 ISB also uses a CP3 CR pump...FWIW.

I've driven a Sport 335D in Northern Ontario for the last three years including gravel roads, 100,000km on the clock now. These cars aren't made of sugar and won't melt in the rain, you know.

I say go for it....if you stick you head under the hood, the M57Y sounds like a Cummins at idle. ( )

Cheers
D
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  #16  
Old 11-12-2012, 01:39 PM
Bluenutsnak Bluenutsnak is offline
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Thanks for all the replies! I want to make sure there hasn't been any issues with the fuel systems since any fuel related parts will cost an arm & a leg.We have the same fuel as the lower 48 has except we run the winter fuel most of the year. Problem is with all the snow we get there is water. The tanker drivers have to chip the snow and ice away from the fuel dump lids and sometimes there is as much as a couple feet of snow/ice/sand his dump nozzle rests on,some do a better job of cleaning the area before unloading. Some of my fellow drives didn't give a damn if anything falls in the stations tanks. Plus the moisture that occurs after being out all day and then thaws out in the garage at night. I always run Power Service with a touch of ash less two stroke oil in the winter. I doubt the newer vehicles need the extra lubricity since they were designed to run todays fuel.I'm going to talk with the service dept at the local BMW and see if extra filtration is needed here. We only have one local stealership in the Anchorage area and without any competition,prices will be expensive if any fuel related parts are needed. I'm going to go ahead and start looking for the right car with the options I want. I look forward to the drive back to AK. I drove my car up here 3 yrs ago and had a blast. Pierre is spot on about the drive to AK,its paved almost all the way and they are always improving the roads. The only issues were the frost heaves and I was down to 10 mph in some areas and if I had waited another month it wouldn't have been as bad. Other areas one could drive way above the posted speed limits since its rare to see any police at all. I can count on needing a new windshield by the time I get home,may try the film NASCAR uses and see if I can save the windshield. I usually have to replace the windshields in both vehicles once a year since a chip like to spread once it warms up in the garage.(fixed or not) Thanks again fellas.
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