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Go Back   Bimmerfest - BMW Forums > BMW Model Discussions > 5 Series > E39 (1997 - 2003)

E39 (1997 - 2003)
The BMW 5-Series (E39 chassis) was introduced in the United States as a 1997 model year car and lasted until the 2004 when the E60 chassis was released. The United States saw several variations including the 525i, 528i, 530i and 540i. -- View the E39 Wiki

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  #1  
Old 03-17-2012, 08:33 AM
juanchi29 juanchi29 is offline
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Mein Auto: 2000 323ci
Pulleys and tensioners

Hey guys,

Its been a long time since I posted, but I do read the threads everyday. I was thinking about selling my 2002 540 sport auto with 124k miles but I can't I love her to much. So ive been doing little things here and there, wrapping the interior in aluminun vinyl. I suck at wrapping need to order more vinyl. Will post pics when interior is completed . I installed some guage rings. I decided to do some preventive maintenance. All of the cooling system has been overhauled almost two years ago except for the water pump, I plan on changing the water pump with a Graf metal impeller pump. Is that the way to go? Also should I change the belts and pulleys and tensioners? Or just the belts and pulleys? I already changed the valve cover gaskets and all plugs. I also plan replacing the fuel filter already change he air filter. Anything else I'm missing? Thanks in advance.
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  #2  
Old 03-17-2012, 09:48 AM
edjack edjack is offline
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Mein Auto: '97 540i 6 speed
I replaced the tensioners at about 88k, preventatively. I also repacked the idler bearings by carefully prising out the plastic seals, thoroughly washing the bearings, and repacking with a sparing amount of hi-temp wheel bearing grease.

I replaced the water pump at 88k, also, with a Graf pump. I'm at 139k now; so far, so good.
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Ed in San Jose '97 540i 6 speed aspensilber over aubergine leather. Build date 3/97. Golden Gate Chapter BMW CCA Nr 62319.
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Old 03-17-2012, 09:56 AM
juanchi29 juanchi29 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by edjack View Post
I replaced the tensioners at about 88k, preventatively. I also repacked the idler bearings by carefully prising out the plastic seals, thoroughly washing the bearings, and repacking with a sparing amount of hi-temp wheel bearing grease.

I replaced the water pump at 88k, also, with a Graf pump. I'm at 139k now; so far, so good.

Thanks for the reply. I was thinking about ordering the tensioner and pulley kit, from pelican parts, does that not include new bearings? I forgot to mention, I ordered motor and tranny mounts from pelican parts.
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Old 03-17-2012, 12:08 PM
juanchi29 juanchi29 is offline
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Bump
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  #5  
Old 03-18-2012, 12:14 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
I'd start here ...

- Recommended parts list for a complete belt drive system overhaul (1)
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Each repair should invariably add to our knowledge base by the process of inexorable incrementalism.
Your job, in return, is to read the suggested threads, where the best people will always add value to those threads, either by pictures or by descriptions, so the next person with the same problem stands on your shoulders.
See also: E39 Bestlinks & How to easily find what you need
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Old 03-18-2012, 06:11 AM
juanchi29 juanchi29 is offline
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Thanks bluebee. Already did fan clutch and alternator. So i guess I need tensioners and pulleys and belts. I'm confused about one thing, is there an idle pulley and a pulley or is it the same thing?
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  #7  
Old 03-19-2012, 07:26 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Quote:
Originally Posted by juanchi29 View Post
is there an idle pulley and a pulley or is it the same thing?
Interestingly, I had asked the same question here:
> Video of cold idle engine intermittent squeal (how to determine cause)?

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
Is the "idler roller" the same as the idler pulley?
This picture shows the idler roller and the two (mechanical in my case) tensioners. The idler roller is closest to the alternator.


Most of us use the word "pulley" interchangeably with "roller" but I think, technically, there is a difference.

BTW, there's an entire DIY in that thread which shows EVERY step in replacing the belt-drive system.



Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
Lest I forget, here are the instructions I wrote (and constantly adjusted) for replacing the alternator and belt drive components:


TEXT DIY FOR ALTERNATOR, TENSIONERS, IDLER ROLLER, & BELTS: (July 2010)

Contributors (in order of appearance): bluebee, mmm635, pleiades, 540_M-Sport,
cn90, QSilver7, Fudman, doru, jarhed1964, supradupe, xraye39, DHoang,
five.two.five, Jason5driver, harris2p, 540iman, & MatWiz.

SYSTEM DESCRIPTION:
- BMW 2002 525i;M54 engine;A5S.325Z automatic transmission;
- Bosch 120amp air-cooled alternator with multi-function control
- INA mechanical belt tensioners for both belts
- belt-driven mechanical cooling fan with viscous clutch (controls fan speed)
- cooling cassette in front of the radiator (cools the ATF, PS, oil, & AC)
- electrically-heated thermostat
- auxiliary electric cooling fan
- auxiliary coolant pump from base of fan shroud on drivers side
- outside (shorter) belt turns the AC compressor
- inner (longer) belt turns alternator, water pump, & power steering pump

ORDER PARTS:
- R&R CS/AC drive belt
- R&R CS/WP/ALT/PS drive belt
- R&R alternator (OEM Bosch 120 amp, P/N AL0703X, 0 124 5 15 050)
- R&R idler pulley
- R&R lower belt tensioner (CS/AC belt)
- R&R upper belt tensioner (CS/WP/ALT/PS belt)

Note: It is highly recommended you order from OemBimmerParts, EACTuning, or other fest supporters!

SUMMARY DIY (thanks to the contributors listed above):
0. Most leave fan shroud & hoses in place & the fan loose inside the shroud
1. Disconnect battery positive terminal in the trunk with 10mm box wrench
2. Remove the mass-air filter housing (a few 6mm hose clamps & a 10mm bolt)
3. Undo fan clutch nut with 32-mm thin wrench & 45-mm spacing counterhold tool
4. Apply clockwise force (16mm) to each tensioner to remove both drive belts.
5. Disconnect power (13-mm) & rectangular connector in back of alternator
6. Unbolt the PS reservoir bracket (two 13-mm bolts) and set it aside.
7. Remove two alternator 16-mm bolts; the upper bolt also holds idler pulley
8. Remove upper mechanical tensioner (two 13mm bolts) with spring extended
9. Remove lower mechanical tensioner (two 13mm bolts) with spring compressed
...
10. Replace lower mechanical tensioner & then upper mechanical tensioner
11. Replace idler roller and alternator and alternator electrical connections
12. Replace the inner cs/wp/alt/ps belt first; then replace the outer cs/ac belt
13. Replace the viscous fan nut onto the water pump
14. Replace the power steering reservoir and the engine air cleaner housing
15. If removed, replace the radiator fan shroud & upper radiator hose
16. Bleed if necessary & test alternator output on the cluster (if equipped).
17. Consider CCV, ICV, OFH gasket, & PSP fluid reservoir leak fixes
Note: Debugging steps are not included in this Remove-and-Replace DIY (R&R).

Note: To replace alternator & drive belt components you do NOT have to remove
the fan or the fan shroud; removal of the fan is highly recommended; removal
of the fan shroud will certainly make access much easier; removal of the
upper radiator hose is trivial and will also aid in access (although hose
removal will entail an additional cooling system refill and bleed).

GATHER TOOLS:
- Cooling fan counterhold wrench BMW 11.5.030; aka pulley holding tool
- Thin 32 mm long box-crescent combination wrench
- OPTIONAL: Alternator pulley nut removal tool BMW 12.7.110 (only if needed)
- 4-to-6 amp 12V battery charger
- Socket wrenches (16mm, 13mm, 6mm) & extensions
- Box wrenches (17mm, 16mm, 10mm)
- Screwdrivers (#2 Philips, 3/16ths inch flathead)
- Spare 5mm or 11/64 allen wrenches or smaller (6mm or 3/16ths are too large)
- Optional: T50 Torx, L-shaped to fit in tight spaces (socket is too large)
- 1 can anti-sieze paste
- 1 can dielectric grease

0. REMOVE RADIATOR FAN SHROUD (OPTIONAL):
See also: http://www.beisansystems.com/procedu..._procedure.htm
- Raise the E39 with a jack and put on jack stands (or ramps)
- Remove the under-engine shroud pan (nine #2 Phillips one-twist bolts)
- Draw the hose sequence or snap photos of the underside shroud hose routing.
- Protect your eyes from falling dust with goggles (I didn't and wished I did).
- Locate the auxiliary pump at the bottom driver-side corner of the shroud.
- Disconnect the press-pull auxiliary coolant pump electrical connector
- Slide the auxiliary pump toward the center of the radiator out of the
fan shroud sleeve by lining up the 0.540" OD hose in the clamp and tugging
gently
- From above, follow the smaller of the two power steering hoses down
until you reach a hose-to-hose clip shared with one of the radiator
hoses; disconnect the radiator hose side of this clip and make a note
of the location of the clip as it will move once you disconnect it.
- From below, for the upper of the two expansion tank hoses only,
working your way from the passengers side to the drivers side,
disconnect the three clips at the bottom of the fan shroud; then
disconnect the one clip at the back of the fan shroud facing the engine.
- From below, for the lower of the two expansion tank hoses, working
your way from the passenger side to the drivers side, disconnect
the three clips on the bottom of the fan shroud and then disconnect
the one clip on the side of the fan shroud.
- Mark with whiteout or nail polish or chalk where the clips line up
with the hoses once the hoses are out (you'll see the indentations).
Later you'll use these marks for reference or you'll transfer these
marks to the new hoses in the same position.
- From above, follow the wire out of the auxiliary water pump to the
AUC (stink) Automatic Air Recirculation sensor on the driver's side in
front of the alternator
just under the upper radiator hose elbow. Notice the orientation of
this AUC sensor (electrical connector up, embossed lettering outward).
You'll need that information for reassembly.
- Press the plastic clip on the stink sensor connector and pull up to
remove the AUC sensor from the fan shroud.
- Remove the diabolically German 2-inch by 3-inch AUC sensor housing
by wiggling and coercing it, mostly pushing up from the bottom of
the AUC sensor housing and pulling the top of the AUC sensor housing
away from the shroud. Then, once it's a bit loose, switch directions
of force by pushing down on the AUC sensor housing, pulling the bottom
of the AUC sensor housing away from the shroud. You have to just do it.
- Place the AUC sensor housing in your parts bin.
- With a 3/16th flathead screwdriver pry out (only) the (center)
plastic rivet pin on the driver's side of the shroud near the upper
hose until you can get needle nose pliers on it to pull that center
pin out. Then pry out the base surrounding the center pin.
- Likewise, remove the rivet to the side of the expansion tank.
- Temporarily remove the expansion tank filler cap.
- With two screwdrivers, pry up the escutcheon around the bleeder screw
next to the expansion tank filler cap (that has the words ENTLUFTUNG
molded into the top) and remove the escutcheon.
- Replace the expansion tank filler cap.
- Study how the M-shaped rubber seal at the top of the fan shroud sits.
- Pull up on the two-foot long M-shaped seal at the top of the fan shroud.
- Lift the fan shroud up and to the rear of the car; you'll get about 4
inches of room to see the small hose that goes across from the expansion
tank to a nipple on the drivers side.
- BE VERY CAREFUL IN THE NEXT STEP (I broke the nipple right off!)
- The Beisan DIY tells you to pry open the original clamp next to the nipple
on the driver's side, so that you can remove the hose. I disagree. You do
not want to put ANY pressure on that brittle nipple. If you must remove
the factory clamp, dremel it off at the point ABOVE the hoses. Better
yet, leave the factory clamp on & remove the entire nipple (gently).
- The nipple often snaps in half right at the edge of the groove for
the o-ring. In addition the groove for the o-ring molded in has sharp
corners rather than a rounded groove, further weakening the part such that
it often snaps when working around it. Some report removing the old nipple
with a 10mm socket pushed into the upper radiator hose opening, and pushed
it on to the "clipped" end to push it closed enough so that it can be pried
out of the radiator (putting a string on the socket in case it fell into
the radiator).
http://bimmerfest.com/forums/showpos...5&postcount=16
- If you haven't done so already, remove the fan clutch nut (see separate
instructions) with 32mm fan clutch nut wrench (1 1/4") and 48-mm hole
spacing fan hub bolt counterhold tool.
- Lift fan shroud and pull fan out toward driver tilting and wiggling
as necessary to get the fan out of the shroud; it will come out aiming
at the driver's steering wheel.
- Beisan says to remove the fan shroud from the engine bay at this point
but I don't see how you can with the expansion tank, it's three hoses,
and the electrical connector on the bottom still connected to the
expansion tank.
- Temporarily remove expansion tank bleed screw with a P3 Phillips screwdriver.
- Take a good long hard look at how the expansion tank hoses snap into
the shroud at the bottom of the expansion tank (you'll need that later
when you put them back).
- Dislodge the expansion tank from the fan shroud by pulling the top
toward the windshield about a half inch away from the top of the fan
shroud; dislodge the two hoses at the bottom from the fan shroud.
- Replace the bleed screw with a P3 Phillips screwdriver.
- Pull the drivers side of the fan shroud up and at the same time pull
the bottom hoses of the expansion tank away from the fan shroud.
- Pull the upper expansion tank house through the tunnel in the
fan so that it is not impeding removal of the fan shroud
- Finally, remove the shroud from the engine bay, leaving the expansion
tank still connected to the car.
- Disconnect the frail-looking electrical connector from the bottom of
the expansion tank.
- The Beisans say to place the expansion tank at a high location in the
engine bay but that only made my broken nipple leak more so I put it
at about the same level it was prior.
- As per the Beisans, I tried to keep the expansion tank overflow hose
high to keep coolant from draining out but whenever I raised the expansion
tank, coolant drained out of the broken nipple on the radiator anyway.
Eventually, while I was working on putting the fan on the water
pump, the expansion tank fell to the floor with a full thud, and
I had to jam a branch of wood from my plants into the broken nipple
end on the end of the hose to stave the bleeding mess.
- At this point, the fan is off, the shroud is off, and the expansion
tank is connected but lying on the ground.
- I have access now to the water pump bolt!

0. REMOVE UPPER RADIATOR HOSE (OPTIONAL):
- Inspect entire length of hose for damage; if it exists, replace the hose.
- Place a catch pan under the radiator hose (or partially drain radiator).
- Never apply side-to-side or twisting or up-and-down motion to the radiator
hose with your hands; apply only axial force with a pry tool.
- Insert the tip of a small 1/8th inch flathead screwdriver under the center
of the u-shaped hose clamp at the radiator neck and leverage the u-shaped
clamp upward to release the lock on the radiator neck.
- Insert the tip of a small 1/8th inch flathead screwdriver into the junction
between the plastic radiator neck and the plastic upper radiator hose end
and twist until the hose is the width of the screwdriver blade outward.
- Once the width is as far as the twisting motion will allow, insert the next
larger size screwdriver into the space and twist again until the hose moves
outward by the width of the screwdriver blade.
- Repeat the twisting action with the next largest screwdriver until the
upper radiator hose simly falls off the radiator neck.
- Insert the tip of a small 1/8th inch flathead screwdriver under the center
of the u-shaped hose clamp at the thermostat housing pipe and leverage the
u-shaped clamp upward to release the lock on the thermostat housing.
- Insert the tip of a small 1/8th inch flathead screwdriver into the junction
between the plastic thermostat housing and the plastic upper radiator hose
end and twist until the hose is the width of the screwdriver blade outward.
- Once the width is as far as the twisting motion will allow, insert the next
larger size screwdriver into the space and twist again until the hose moves
outward by the width of the screwdriver blade.
- Repeat the twisting action with the next largest screwdriver until the
upper radiator hose simly falls off the thermostat housing.
- With wire cutters, cut the original black plastic wire tie holding a
wiring harness to the upper radiator hose near where the upper radiator hose
bleed screw is located.
- Remove the upper radiator hose from the vehicle.

1. DISCONNECT BATTERY POWER AND CHARGE BATTERY:
- Set up your computer in your work area with Internet access to Bimmerfest
- Grab a box of nitrile gloves and a solvent cleaner & roll of paper towels
- Disconnect both battery cables with a 10mm box wrench (to be safe)
- Optional: Charge battery with less than 16.5V, 6 amps capacity charger

2. REMOVE ENGINE AIR CLEANER HOUSING:
- To prevent breakage of fragile plastic parts (ask me how I know),
remove the driver's side outer headlight lamp and the angel eye lamp
and wrap in a clean cloth with rubber bands holding the protection on.
- So that the parts go back the same way they came out, scratch with an
awl or other sharp object a demarcation line where the large and small
air intake hoses emanating from the front drivers side fender mate with
the air intake housing ductwork, prior to disassembly.
- Make a note of the under-the-MAF-sensor-housing routing of the MAF sensor
harness connector so that you can route it properly when you reassemble.
- Make a note of the direction & orientation of the hose clamps as they
may fall off during the ensuing repair and you'll want to put them back
the same way they were prior.
- With a jar of whiteout, mark a line on each disassembled tube so that
when you reassemble, you won't make any mistakes of not putting them
in far enough (they're all black).
- Loosen intake duct hose clamp at throttle assembly with a 3/16th flathead
(or, better yet as I belatedly learned, with a 6mm socket on an extension)
- Spread plastic clip to remove remove 1/4" idle control hose from intake duct
- Spread open two metal clips holding mass air flow sensor
- I tried to disconnect idle speed control valve harness connector but
I just can't find it, not from the Bentley pictures, nor from looking
- Disconnect harness connector from mass air flow sensor (press & pull)
- Remove air filter housing mounting screw with a 10mm socket or box wrench
- Disconnect vent tube by pulling back on the soft rubber with your hands
- Loosen air intake duct clamp with a 3/16ths flathead screwdriver
- I had to remove the MAF sensor housing in order to gain room
- I had to remove the engine air filter in order to gain leverage
- I had to twist the hard plastic vent tube out of the way to gain room
- Nobody tells you there is an unclamped hose at the BOTTOM of the
engine side of the air intake hose just after the MAF that holds it all up!
- Since there was no clamp on that bottom hose, I was on my own
(no instructions in the Bentleys mentioned any of this!)
- I elected to remove the two hose clamps near the engine on the large
3-inch air intake hose with a 3/16ths flathead screwdriver (or better yet,
with a 6mm socket on a 1/4 inch ratchet driver handle)
- Only after loosening those additional two hose clamps was I able to lift
the engine air intake up and back over the engine.
- This engine air intake is still connected to the engine by a pair of
what looks like vacuum hoses which I couldn't get loose for fear of
breaking the plastic nipple, so I left it all connected draped over
the engine
- Optional: I dumped leaf remnants out of the air filter housing inlet
- Optional: I put the 10mm bolt back so as not to lose it
- Optional: I tightened the three hose clamps so as to not lose them
in the ensuing battle; it was then that I realized a 6mm
socket on a 1/4" socket handle would have been easier than
the screwdriver (and updated the appropriate step above)
- Optional: While the MAF was removed, I hit it with a dozen pulses of
special MAF cleaner (aka xylene) and let air dry
- For the first time, I was able to feel the alternator belt tension,
which felt solid

Note: I still don't know if I was supposed to disconnect those two small
hoses still connected, or if I was supposed to pull on the one-inch
wide hose w/o a clamp that is still connected under the MAF closer
to the engine. But the air cleaner is off and to the side for now.

3. REMOVE VISCOUS FAN CLUTCH NUT (OPTIONAL BUT HIGHLY RECOMMENDED):
- Lift car with jack under the engine pad & place jack stands on jack pads
- Set parking brake and chock both rear wheels
- Twirl fan blade; check that fan clutch spins it twice after you let it go
- Mine spun about a quarter of a turn after I let it go (both directions)
- Let the engine cool down if it was used recently.
- Apply WD40 to fan clutch nut
- From below, remove under-engine plastic shroud (9 P2 Phillips head screws)
- Each Phillips head screw twists out in a single turn & stays with the shroud
- First place the fan counterhold tool (45 mm hole spacing) on the viscous
fan pulley nuts so that you can hold the pulley from turning
- Then place the 32mm (1 1/4") thin long open-end wrench on the viscous
fan nut.
- Scissor the two 16-inch long tools, twisting the left-hand threaded
viscous fan nut clockwise to remove (holding back with the counterhold tool)
- Once you crack the nut loose, spin it off by hand and place the fan
tucked out of the way in the well of the radiator shroud
- Removing the viscous fan gives you a lot more room to maneuver
Note: Some say to keep the fan clutch vertical so fluid doesn't leak out!
Note: Fan nut is either M23x1.50 or M24x1.50.

4. REMOVE BOTH DRIVE BELTS:
- Draw a diagram of the belt pathways.
- The outside (shorter) belt turns the AC compressor
- The inner (longer) belt turns alternator, water pump, & power steering pump
- The AC belt is thinner than its grooves so make special note before removal.
- My larger belt went from the top of the alternator -> to the outside of the
power steering pump --> to the engine-side groove of the crankshaft
pulley --> around the pulley almost 360 degrees to the idler roller
upside down curling around the idler roller from the bottom --> then to
the bottom of the water pump pulley and around the water pump --> then
again upside down to the very bottom 15 degrees of the upper mechanical
tensioner --> over to the top of the alternator pulley.
- My smaller belt went from the top of the compressor --> over to the top
of the crankshaft pulley around the bottom of the crankshaft pulley -->
over to the top 15 degrees of the lower mechanical tensioner --> back
over to the bottom of the AC compressor pulley.
- Find two small allen wrenches that you should insert into the tabs in
the two mechanical tensioners to keep the tension off until you're ready
to replace the belts (and to free up access to the 13mm mounting bolts)
- To remove alternator belt (it has to come off first), place a 16mm
box wrench on the lower mechanical tensioner and turn the box wrench
clockwise; this will loosen tension so you can slip the allen wrench
into the holes when the moving hole lines up with the stationary hole
- Once the lower mechanical tensioner is locked in the open position,
slip the alternator belt off the pulleys.
- Optional: Spin the pulley of the lower mechanical tensioner with the
belt removed; if you hear a "dry sound", it needs to be replaced.

- Note: If you wish to remove the pulley on the mechanical tensioner,
you will need an L-shaped T50 Torx wrench or you will need to remove
the fan shroud as there is not enough room for a socket or screwdriver
T50 Torx wrench between the mechanical tensioner pulley and the lower
lip of the fan shroud. However some say the they don't sell the pulley
separately so you need to remove both 13mm bolts holding the mechanical
tensioner in place, one of which will be a bear to access.
- The upper mechanical tensioner will be harder to access the 16mm leverage
nut. It can be accessed from the top with a 16mm socket wrench or even
easier from the bottom. Turn the wrench clockwise and this will lesson
the tension on the belt so that you can slip the belt off after inserting
your second spare allen wrench into the holes as they align with your
tension.
- With both belts off, spin the pulleys by hand. Here is what I found:
- waterpump pulley ==> spins 3 to 5 times quietly when spun (probably OK)
- crankshaft pulley ==> does not rotate by hand (I'm sure that's OK)
- power steering pulley ==> goes about 1/4 rotation when spun (probably OK)
- AC compressor pulley ==> spins about 3 or 4 turns silently (probably OK)
- alternator pulley ==> spins about 1 or 2 turns silently (probably OK)
- upper tensioner pulley ==> spins 10 or so turns noisily (probably BAD)
- lower tensioner pulley ==> spins about 15 turns barely audible (probably bad)
- idler roller ==> won't spin at all; very hard to spin; (probably bad)

5. REMOVE ALTERNATOR ELECTRICAL CONNECTORS:
- Remove the 17mm plastic-tipped nut for the red power cord from the back
of the alternator using a 17mm box wrench
- Press the pin and remove the top harness connector from the back of the
alternator

6. REMOVE POWER STEERING FLUID RESERVOIR BRACKET:
- Before removing the power steering reservoir bracket, make a note of
where the 1/4" corrugated plastic wiring goes between the power steering
reservoir and the oil filter housing (for later proper reassembly).
- With a 13mm socket and a six-inch extension bar to clear the power steering
fluid reservoir, first remove the rear bolt and then the front bolt
holding the power steering reservoir bracket and position power steering
reservoir safely
Note: Once the alternator is removed, loosely put the power steering pump
back on its brackets to prevent leakage and hose stress.
- Notice the bottom hose may be leaking; see cn0 fix for that.
- Leave the power steering hoses (for now); this just gives you access to
the two 16mm holding bolts for the alternator bracket.

FIX POWER STEERING RESERVOIR LEAKY HOSE (OPTIONAL):
- Leaky hose = 0.745"OD (other hose is 0.915" OD) (Doru says 20.9 - 24.1 mm)
- Drain hose from 22mm bolt facing the rear on the power steering pump
- or use baster (or pour)
- Third end is on the power steering pump itself
- Don't buy OEM Oetker clamp
- Flush it backward if you remove it
- The return hose from cooling coils to the reservor leaks.
- Start engine - turn steering wheel from side to side a few times,
- Check fluid level and add as necessary, repeat if necessary...
- Hose clamp to psp is realoem D=20,9-24,1 (for 530)
- Hose clamp to radiator is realoem D=16,6-20MM (for 530)
- Sears Craftsman 6" wire cutters (9 45075) grab between the outer lip and
one of the three locking nubs
- Closest clamp (far off) is #12 which is 9/16 to 1 1/4 (Tridon brand)
- Found a #8 which was a closer fit
- Use 8mm 1/4 socket on the flatheat bolts for secure twisting
- Used a costco 1kg smokehouse almonds container with a wide top for your fist
- Inspect color of fluid in the daylight (red --> grey)

REFERENCES:
- http://www.bimmerboard.com/forums/posts/199986
- http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=245304
- http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=327581
- http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/showthread.php?t=61089

7. REMOVE ALTERNATOR HOLDING BOLTS:
- The upper 16mm alternator holding bolt is the bolt holding on the idler
pulley; while the lower 16mm bolt is on the alternator bracket alone.
- It's easier to get to both the 16mm holding bolts from below than from
above.
- The upper holding bolt is removed with a 16mm socket and the lower one
requires a short two-inch extension and socket.
- Wiggle the unclamped plastic air duct off the bottom back of the alternator
- Now just wiggle the alternator out; it came out easily for me.
- You'll also have the idler pulley in your hands at this time.

8. REMOVE UPPER MECHANICAL TENSIONER:
- Tools: 13mm & 16mm socket, 3-inch socket extension
- Unlike the lower tensioner, you need to REMOVE the hold-fast pin
- Turn clockwise on the 16mm molding to release tension on the hold-fast pin
- Remove your 5mm or 11/64 allen wrench hold-fast pin placed during the
belt-removal process
- With a 13mm box wrench, remove the lower & upper 13mm tensioner bolts
- Remove the upper mechanical air conditioning tensioner from the engine
- Mark the tensioner as the alt/ps/wp tensioner (they are slightly different)

9. REMOVE LOWER MECHANICAL TENSIONER:
- Tools: 13mm and 16mm socket, 3-inch socket extension
- Spare allen wrench of just under about 5mm diameter (mine was unmarked)
- From underneath, turn the 16mm molded nut clockwise till the tabs line up
- Slip the spare 5mm allen wrench into the two tabs to lock them in place
- With a 13mm box wrench on a 3-inch extension, remove both bolts
- Remove lower mechanical air conditioning tensioner
- Leave the spare allen wrench in place (how do you safely remove it?)
- Mark the tensioner as the AC tensioner (they are slightly different)
Note: AC mechanical tensioners were redesigned in 8/2002 so compare with new
Note: How do we safely remove the spare allen wrench in the old tensioner?

Summary:
- Both belts are off the M54 engine
- The alternator and idler pulley are off the car
- Both mechanical tensioners are off the car
- The engine air cleaner and MAF housing are off (tucked on top of engine)
- The mechanical viscous fan clutch is off (tucked next to radiator)
- The power steering reservoir is off (hoses still attached)
- The fan shroud, radiator, and all radiator hoses are intact

Note: Lightly coat the water pump pulley flange with anti-seize where it
contacts the pulley. Avoid getting anti-seize in the bolt holes.
The anti-seize helps prevent the pulley from fusing to the flange.
Also coat the viscous fan nut with the anti-sieze paste.

Note: You should replace a bad idler pulley, but you can repack as per cn90:
- Use a hook and gently pry the rubber seal.
- Soak the bearing in a small container with gasoline to wash out old grease.
- Then repack with new grease.
- Gently re-apply the seal, taking care not to damage it.

Inspect oil filter housing gasket for leaks; repair if necessary.
Inspect power steering pump hoses for leaks; repair if necessary.
Inspect valve cover gasket for leaks; repair if necessary.
Inspect CCV and ICV; clean and/or replace if necessary.
Inspect cooling system components; replace if necessary.

10. REPLACE MECHANICAL TENSIONERS:
- Replace lower mechanical tensioner (two 13mm bolts) with spring compressed
Put the upper bolt in first as it's harder than the lower bolt.
I used a 13mm socket on a 3-inch exenstion and hand twirled the bolt
Torque as per Bentley page 121-16 & 020-19 is 16 ft lbs for the M54 engine.
- Replace upper mechanical tensioner (two 13mm bolts) with spring extended
Thinly coat the bolts with anti-seize paste.
Put the upper bolt in first as it's harder than the lower bolt.
I used a 13mm socket on a 3-inch exenstion and hand twirled the bolt
Torque as per Bentley page 121-16 & 020-19 is 16 ft lbs for the M54 engine.
But there really isn't much room for my long click-type torque wrench.
- THIS IS A STEP I MISSED AND IT COST ME DEARLY!
I should have used the 16mm wrench to place the ~5mm allen wrench
holding tension on the upper tensioner! This cost me dearly as I tried
to do so AFTER putting in the entire alternator; and failed!

11. REPLACE IDLER ROLLER & ALTERNATOR & ALTERNATOR ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS:
- Replace two alternator 16-mm bolts; the upper bolt also holds idler pulley
Thinly coat the bolts with anti-seize paste.
I tried to torque as per Bentley but there is no mention of the torque.
So I looked here for torque figures from cn90 which showed on page 30 the
idler bolt is 90Nm, which from this chart is a whopping 97 foot pounds!
On page 57 of cn90's torque book the torque on the rear holder bolt is
shown as a measly 3.5 Nm, neither number do I believe.
http://www.thetoolhut.com/Torque-Con...sh-Metric.html
http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...78&postcount=2
- Reconnect the B+ power cable by the 17mm nut at the back of the alternator.
Bentley page 121-17 says to use 10 foot pounds of torque.
- Reconnect the rectangular field connector by pushing it into the
back of alternator.

12. REPLACE BOTH DRIVE BELTS:
- Make sure your original belt diagram is handy (you'll refer to it a lot!).
- Make sure the pin is in both tensioners; if not, place a pin in each.
- Wind the CS/WP/ALT/PS inner belt back on, starting from the reverse twist
on the upper tensioner looping back over the water pump to the underside
of the idler roller, with the pin keeping tension off the belt while your
fingers are in there.
If there's any slack, you put it on wrong (ask me how I know).
- You still have to use your 16mm sockete wrench to turn clockwise to push
past where the pin is to get everything in their groove.
- When the inner belt is finally in place, turn the 16mm socket wrench
clockwise just a little bit more in order to remove the pin with your
hands and get the last inch of the inner belt on just right.
- Now wind the AC compressor outer belt on as per your diagram.
- Again, remove the pin when the belt is positioned correctly.

13. REPLACE VISCOUS FAN NUT ONTO WATERPUMP HUB:
- Place a dab of anti-seize on the fan hub bolt and then spin the
32mm fan clutch nut COUNTER-CLOCKWISE back on the fan hub bolt.
- Optionally, twist slightly clockwise to set the nut on the threads before
twisting counterclockwise to spin the fan on.
- Best is to use the cn90 string trick as described below:

a. Tape the end of a string of about 2 feet of rawhide onto the fan clutch nut.
b. Wrap that rawhide counterclockwise (from the front of the engine) for
about five or ten twists
c. With one hand holding the fan against gravity, and positioning the fan
nut on the water pump hub shaft, use your other hand to pull up on the
rawhide string so as to spin the fan clutch nut on counterclockwise
without gravity being a major problem.
d. When the nut is spun on most of the way, remove the string and tape.
e. Tighten the fan clutch nut as desired until the water pump begins moving.
f. Hold the water pump from moving with your 45mm spacing counterhold tool
and spin the fan clutch nut on the remaining few threads using your thin
long 32mm open-end wrench.

Note: Page 170-15 of the Bentleys lists the torque as 89 INCH pounds; but
there is really no need to torque on the fan nut as the engine will
tighten it as it rotates counterclockwise (facing the engine from front).

14. REPLACE POWER STEERING RESERVOIR BRACKET & REPLACE ENGINE AIR INTAKE:
- From above, with a six-inch socket bar extension to clear the reservoir,
replace the rear 13mm bolts first for the power steering reservoir
bracket (it's the harder one) and then the front 13mm bolt and tighten
both to specifications.
- Double check the hose clamps at the bottom of the power steering
reservoir, especially if you shortened or replaced the hoses due to
leakage.
- Angle the clamp so that it won't be blocked when you eventually put
the engine air filter housing back on (ask me how I know).
- Refill with Dexron III ATF (essentially Dexron VI since GM no longer
legally certifies Dexron III). My empty reservoir took 550 ml (or
about 18 fluid ounces) on the first fill before starting engine.

15.REPLACE FAN SHROUD (IF IT WAS REMOVED):
- Clean the expansion tank coolant temperature sensor electrical connector
with MAF sensor cleaner (xylene) and when dry, add a dab of dielectric grease.
- Reconnect the expansion tank coolant temperature sensor connector but don't
make the mistake I made which was to connect with the wires above the ac
hose; the wires must be below the ac hose.
- Rethread the expansion tank overflow hose through the top of the fan shroud
- Reconnect the nipple and pipe clamp. Don't make the mistake I did, thinking
I could leave this for later because as soon as I removed the bleed screw
in the expansion tank, fluid leaked out of the radiator hole due to the
expansion tank being above that hole. When you press the nipple down into
the radiator, make sure it goes all the way until the seam is small
(I used a soft rubber mallet).
- Make sure the hose-clamp bolt is at south position, closest to the
radiator and furthest from the fan shroud. I used a 7mm quarter-inch
socket for security when tightening.
- Place the shroud approximately in place with the drivers side up about
six inches higher and replace the expansion tank hoses (I struggled for
half an hour trying to get the two hoses in the bottom of the expansion
tank to snap back into place). Finally I re-removed the bleeder screw,
tilted the expansion tank about 1/2 inch at the top away from the
fan shroud, and snap, the bottom hoses snapped into place instantly.
Lesson learned.
- Replace the bleeder screw using a P3 Phillips screwdriver.
- Tape and wrap about 2 feet of rawhide on the fan nut.
- Place fan clutch assembly inside the fan shroud.
- Position fan shroud as close to perfect on the top and put on eye=
protection and then go down
underneath the car to move hoses about and position the fan shroud
back in the two (2) plastic clips at the bottom and one in each bottom
corner (2). There is a clip on the sides (2), about a third of the way
up, and a clip near the top on the sides (2) for a total of about
8 clips.
- Unfortunately for me, my careful taping of the fan clutch fell off when
I tried to keep the heavy fan out of my way by tying it to the car.
Lesson learned. Don't try that.
- Again taping the rawhide on from the driver's side (there is no access
on the passenger side of the fan shroud due to the fact the expansion
tank is now firmly in) and wrapping it around the fan clutch nut,
it was easy to spin the fan on straight; took less than a minute
to get the fan nut spun onto five or six threads until it almost
bottomed on the shoulder of the water pump shaft.
- When the string falls off, tighten the nut (counter clockwise) by
holding the fan with your left hand and turning the 32 mm wrench
counter clockwise (the water pump hub won't spin due to belt
tension). After about 10, fifteen degree twists of the 32mm wrench,
you'll feel the nut tighten and the water pump hub will finally
move.
- Bringing the 45-mm hole spacing counterhold tool from the driver's
side, UNDER the upper hose (it won't work any other way), twist the
fan hub with the 32mm wrench until the right set of holes seats in
the hole and slot of the counterhold tool. Tighten as desired.
(Personally, I couldn't get more than a couple of degrees of
movement.)
- Nudge the fan shroud into its final seating position, taking care to
inspect the two rivet holes at top (2), the clips on the bottom third
on the side (2), the clips at each bottom corner (2) and the two clips
on the bottom (2) for a total of 8 clips.
- The top should be aligned so that you can replace the two-foot long
rubber M-shaped seal at the top of the fan shroud. Press along the
entire length of both channels of the M-shaped seal to confirm proper
positioning.
- Temporarily remove the expansion tank filler cap.
- Align the two clips and the word ENTLUFTUNG for the escutcheon that
goes around the bleeder screw next to the expansion tank filler cap.
and snap into place by wiggling the expansion tank and fan shroud
as you press down on the escutcheon.
- Replace expansion tank filler cap.
- From above, replace the plastic rivets at each corner of the shroud.
- Pick up the AUC sensor housing out of your parts box and locate the
holes in the fan shroud just below the upper radiator hose elbow where
it snaps into place on the fan shroud.
- Orient the diabolically German 2-inch by 3-inch automatic air recirculation
AUC sensor housing
with the electrical connector facing upwards and the embossed letters
facing to the driver's side outside of the car. Notice the hooks at the
top of the housing face down and the hooks on the bottom face up, while
the flap at the very bottom opens horizontally. Place the two bottom
hooks in first, then lift up while pressing in so that you can place
the top hooks next. The bottom flap should land over the bottom shelf
of the fan shroud connection point. At this point, I noticed my bottom
shelf was broken, probably when I manhandled the AUC out the first
time.
- Place a dab of dielectric grease in the electrical connector for the
AUC and connect the AUC sensor wiring connector making sure to keep
the wires below the upper radiator hose elbow.
- From above, locate the electrical connector for the auxiliary pump
and place a dab of dielectric grease on the connector before feeding
it down dangling to where you can reach it below.
- From underneath, align the auxiliary pump with its holder on the fan
shroud and slide in from the center toward the drivers side until
the marks you made prior on the hose align with the clips on the
fan shroud.
- Press the electrical connector for the auxiliary fan onto the
auxiliary fan until you hear it click tight.
- From above, follow the smaller of the two lines emanating from the
bottom of the power steering reservoir to the hose-to-hose clip
for the lower expansion tank hose and connect the two hoses together
at the point noted before you originally removed this clip.
- From below, for the lower expansion tank hose only, working your way
from the drivers side to the passenger side, connect the clip on the
side of the fan shroud; and lastly connect the three clips at the
bottom of the fan shroud.
- From below, for the upper of the two expansion tank hoses only,
working your way from the drivers side to the passenger side,
connect the clip on the edge of the fan shroud facing the engine;
and then connect the three clips at the bottom of the fan shroud.
- Reattach the lower engine cover 9 P3 Phillips one-turn screws.
- Voila! You've reattached your fan shroud.

REPLACE LOWER ENGINE SHROUD
- Reattach the lower engine shroud using the nine P3 one-twist Phillips screws.

REFILL LOST COOLANT & BLEED:
- http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=449008
- http://forums.bimmerforums.com/forum....php?t=1423821
- http://m3forum.net/m3forum/showthread.php?t=225208

Note: The Bentleys don't provide torque values for the two 16mm long bolts
of the alternator bracket.

HINDSIGHT:
My alternator removal was not planned; it just gave out on me. Had I planned better, the items to always consider proactively on the I6 seem to be:
0. Alternator & drive belt system (tensioners, idler roller, belts)
1. Oil Filter Housing (OFH) and crankcase ventilation valve (CCV) and idle control valve gasket (ICV) & throttle body gasket:
2. Vanos, Valve Cover Gasket (VCG), & spark plugs
3. Cooling system overhaul (expansion tank, radiator, fan clutch, water pump, upper and lower radiator hoses, thermostat & housing)

Oil Filter Housing leak (OFH) DIYs:
- ElwoodBlues Oil Filter Housing Gasket DIY for a 2002 530i (OFH)
- CN90 Oil Filter Housing Gaskety DIY for a 1998 528i (OFH)
- BryanH Oil Filter Housing Gasket DIY for a 1998 528i (OFH)

Crankcase Ventilation Valve DIYs (CCV PCV, throttle body gasket, & idle control valve (ICV) gasket):
- Fudman CCV M54 DIY for a 2002 530i
-
Gumbi4u CCV/PCV Changed out M54 530i
-throttle body gasket and idle control valve seal/gasket
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  #8  
Old 12-16-2012, 03:48 PM
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Good info here
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Old 12-16-2012, 08:56 PM
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bin01123 bin01123 is offline
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I'm doing a cooling system overhaul and I'm replacing both belts while I'm there. My 540 has 87k. I see you guys are replacing tensioners. Do they go bad and should I do it?

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Old 12-17-2012, 04:52 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bin01123 View Post
Do they go bad and should I do it?
- Complete cooling system overhaul recommended parts list (1)
- Recommended parts list for a complete belt drive system overhaul (1)
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Old 12-17-2012, 08:46 AM
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bin01123 bin01123 is offline
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Bluebee,

Thanks for the reading material because this is good stuff. I already have the full list of items for the cooling system. I'm looking at the parts for the belt drive and I see you have an alternator listed there. Do they have a history of going bad? I only ask because that's going to put my list over $1,000 in replacement parts and I'm mainly looking to replace the cooling system and belts while they are off. I probably will add the tensioners and roller to the list of items to be replaced as well.
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Old 12-17-2012, 12:13 PM
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540 M-Sport 540 M-Sport is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bin01123 View Post
I'm doing a cooling system overhaul and I'm replacing both belts while I'm there. My 540 has 87k. I see you guys are replacing tensioners. Do they go bad and should I do it?

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Usually not that soon. I had my cooling system overhaul performed at around 123k or there about. I went ahead and replaced the tensioners and all pullies. None were ready to fail, but the tech said it was good to replace at this time, rather than wait until the next service.

You are at the point where it might be worth replacing tensioners and pullies, since you likely will not want to get into that stuff for another 80k miles (assuming you keep the car that long).

My list was extensive:
water pump
thermostat
fan clutch
all coolant hoses (there are quite a few, including heater hoses)
pullies
belts
tensioners
radiator
expansion tank
tank cap
I only used oem or oes suppliers, and with careful internet shopping spent around $900 or so in parts
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Old 12-17-2012, 03:44 PM
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That exactly what I'm looking to do and I'm at about 720 in parts. How many hoses are there? I've only seen an upper and lower

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Old 12-18-2012, 08:36 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bin01123 View Post
How many hoses are there?
Did you click on the links provided ?
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Old 12-18-2012, 12:58 PM
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This is also my next DIY project. I've already replaced all the tensioners and belts recently so I only need the WP, thermostat, hoses and, expansion tank, fan, fan clutch radiator. My question is should I also include the vent hose that goes from expansion tank to radiator? I do not see that listed in any of the recommended parts list. I have attached a picture. The part number is 17111427156.
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Old 12-18-2012, 08:44 PM
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^^
Just saw the hose I was checking for on the list. On realoem it is called vent hose while on cn90's list it is the bypass hose.
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Old 12-19-2012, 05:43 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BM109R View Post
^^
Just saw the hose I was checking for on the list. On realoem it is called vent hose while on cn90's list it is the bypass hose.
Thanks for making that clarification; I'll add it to the parts list description.
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Old 12-19-2012, 10:24 PM
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Adding to my to-do list as well. Thanks guys
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Old 04-19-2013, 09:45 AM
bagodonuts68 bagodonuts68 is offline
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thanks again to bluebee. your informed input is massively valuable.
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