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  #1  
Old 01-09-2006, 02:47 PM
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Stevarino Stevarino is offline
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BMW Salesman average income question.

The company that I work for is going down for the "eight count". I need a new job. One of the ideas I have is selling cars, especially BMW. My question is how much does the average salesman make after say, six months? I know that the answer is all over the park but I would like to know what the average is, just to get an idea. I know that in most sales jobs, "many are called and few are chosen".

I just want to do a little research before I start calling around to get an interview.

Thanks. Any info would be appreciated.
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  #2  
Old 01-09-2006, 03:10 PM
philippek philippek is offline
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Huge variances from region to region, store to store and salesman to salesman. I can tell you that at my store CAs will make anywhere from $50-150k.

I'd recommend just walking in and asking to speak with Sales Manager or preferably the GSM. Tell him your situation and expectations, and they should be upfront with you about their expectations.

Also, most BMW stores won't consider you without some experience in the auto industry. So it's probably behooves you to make an appearance and present yourself to see if you'd be a good fit for them, and vice versa.
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  #3  
Old 01-09-2006, 03:28 PM
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Thank you very much for that info. That is exactly what I wanted to know. That is a nice range of income. Thanks again.
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  #4  
Old 01-09-2006, 06:04 PM
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SARAFIL SARAFIL is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevarino
The company that I work for is going down for the "eight count". I need a new job. One of the ideas I have is selling cars, especially BMW. My question is how much does the average salesman make after say, six months? I know that the answer is all over the park but I would like to know what the average is, just to get an idea. I know that in most sales jobs, "many are called and few are chosen".

I just want to do a little research before I start calling around to get an interview.

Thanks. Any info would be appreciated.

Let's say that your dealer pays 25% of gross. Let's say that you get alot of people like the posters here that want to buy cars for $500-1000 over invoice. Let's say that your dealer has a $500 "pack" (administrative fee) that comes out of the commissionable gross. So, you're going to make a lot of minimum commissions ($100, $150, $200, etc. depending on the dealer). If you sell 10 of these cars a month, you might make enough to pay your car payment.

On a serious note, it is tough to make lots of money in car sales right away. You need to be good, you need to know how to sell, and you need to be able to make some good hits to offset the people that you make nothing off of.

I think it is safe to say that most average BMW sales people are in the $50-70k range, with the better sales people in the $70-120k range, an the all-stars are $120k+. This last category of people is small, and it consists of people that are usually in the larger dealerships in major markets.
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  #5  
Old 01-10-2006, 12:33 AM
chrischeung chrischeung is online now
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Nice reply - what about the hours

Is there a strong relationship between hours worked and compensation received for sales persons?
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  #6  
Old 01-10-2006, 02:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrischeung
Is there a strong relationship between hours worked and compensation received for sales persons?
I think that it all depends on the location. For example the DC metro area is a very multicultural region, and I know of several asian sales reps (who are also my friends) at several BMW dealers in my region who are overwhelmed with referral business, and generally work less hours than all of the other sales reps, but always manage to be among the top producing/selling reps month in month out. As in any sales oriented job/field "consistent" referrals are the key to one's success. In my opinion and my experience the asian public has this mastered, with their "stick to their own" mentality, because this is whom they feel most comfortable and relate to the most.

However, I'm sure in other regions of the country where it is less diverse, and no one has any advantage, it all comes down to who works the longest hours, greets the most customers, networks the best, in addition to their referral business.
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  #7  
Old 01-10-2006, 04:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wwb4

However, I'm sure in other regions of the country where it is less diverse, and no one has any advantage, it all comes down to who works the longest hours, greets the most customers, networks the best, in addition to their referral business.

"Live by the up, die by the up", you absolutely NEED a refferal base if you want to make money. Before you convince yourself to go into car sales, put lots of thought into working 50-60 hrs a week( I son't care what they tell you, if you want to sell a car you must be at the dealership or you can go home and lose half your comm on a split), giving up nights and weekends, and a good chance you'll end up taking on drinking and smoking.
I was in it too long and the happiest day for me in the car business was my last. I did learn alot while I was doing it and have been able to make use of what I learned in another business. This isn't to discourage you but rather hopefully make you think of everything that the job is going toi affect,m like your entire life
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  #8  
Old 01-16-2006, 09:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevarino
The company that I work for is going down for the "eight count". I need a new job. One of the ideas I have is selling cars, especially BMW. My question is how much does the average salesman make after say, six months? I know that the answer is all over the park but I would like to know what the average is, just to get an idea. I know that in most sales jobs, "many are called and few are chosen".

I just want to do a little research before I start calling around to get an interview.

Thanks. Any info would be appreciated.
I would recommend a longer term approach than six months, especially if you have not worked in the industry before.......... plan on investing 2-3 years of hard work and then see where you are.......
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  #9  
Old 01-17-2006, 09:20 PM
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Why does it take so long? Every time I buy a car it seems that the salesman is new. I assume there is a large turnover.

However, would you not know after only a few months as a salesmsn if you were going to make a living at it ?
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  #10  
Old 01-17-2006, 09:53 PM
tvo7 tvo7 is offline
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Thats true severino. I went to local dealership last year, talked to a salesman. This year, its like the whole staff is new. DO the dealerships let you go if you don't meet your quota? Whats funny, just like new house salesman in the model homes, when yuo ask him where so and so is, the asnwer is always " he left us cuz found another job".
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  #11  
Old 01-18-2006, 03:50 AM
ktc ktc is offline
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I also wonder about whether or not, over time, a car salesman starts to lose interest in their line of cars because it's day in, day out, same set of questions from the buyers, and one starts to "sell" their cars more than admire their cars...

... could it ruins one's original love for the BMW?
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  #12  
Old 01-18-2006, 04:40 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevarino
Why does it take so long? Every time I buy a car it seems that the salesman is new. I assume there is a large turnover.

However, would you not know after only a few months as a salesmsn if you were going to make a living at it ?
It's building your customer base, when you first start your gonna be doing lots of training and taking fresh lot ups. Once you have established a base of good customers that are returning to buy from you and sending friends and family to see you, then you know if you are going to be one of the top money makers. Ideally you'd have a big base of lease customers that you just cycle through every 24 - 36 months.
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  #13  
Old 01-18-2006, 04:42 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ktc
I also wonder about whether or not, over time, a car salesman starts to lose interest in their line of cars because it's day in, day out, same set of questions from the buyers, and one starts to "sell" their cars more than admire their cars...

... could it ruins one's original love for the BMW?
Yes, you get blacked out over time and your lack of enthusiasm tends to show with the customers and results in lower sales, you must be very good at checking all personal emotions at the door.
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  #14  
Old 01-18-2006, 05:03 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevarino
Why does it take so long? Every time I buy a car it seems that the salesman is new. I assume there is a large turnover.

However, would you not know after only a few months as a salesmsn if you were going to make a living at it ?
Actually, it isn't until your first year passes that you will know if you can handle being a car salesman.

A lot of people think that selling cars is as simple as showing the car and taking the money. Those that fall into this category are the ones that usually last less than a year.

What you need to do is ask yourself a couple of questions...

1. Can you apply the right kind of pressure on a stranger in order reach a descision without turning him/her off?
2. Can you "connect" with a person in the first 10 - 20 minutes?
3. Can you handle a job where you are always looked at as the enemy who is trying to rob innocent boys and girls?
4. Are you willing to work 12 hour days and weekends and still make minimum wage?
5. Can you stay motivated in an environment where your value to the dealership is directly proportional to the number of cars you sold last month?

and finally....
6. Do you really want to work in the only buisness where everyone expects you to work for free (zero profit)?

Looking at your post, I think you might have a very narrow view of what it means to be a car salesman. Just showing up will not get you a 50k per year income. And, just because you show up doesn't mean you will sell a car.

I would suggest you try to find someone who has been in the buisness for several years, take them out, get them drunk, and then let them tell you all the gory details.
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  #15  
Old 01-25-2006, 01:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wwb4
I think that it all depends on the location. For example the DC metro area is a very multicultural region, and I know of several asian sales reps (who are also my friends) at several BMW dealers in my region who are overwhelmed with referral business, and generally work less hours than all of the other sales reps, but always manage to be among the top producing/selling reps month in month out. As in any sales oriented job/field "consistent" referrals are the key to one's success. In my opinion and my experience the asian public has this mastered, with their "stick to their own" mentality, because this is whom they feel most comfortable and relate to the most.

However, I'm sure in other regions of the country where it is less diverse, and no one has any advantage, it all comes down to who works the longest hours, greets the most customers, networks the best, in addition to their referral business.

Hmmm...have you sold vehicles? My observances are slightly different from yours (and I've got tons of folks who agree with me on this!). The Asian salespeople I've noticed tend to be hard workers, and good closers. As well, the Asians, like hispanics, are pretty loyal to their own.

However, I don't see Asian, or any other salesperson making much money off a deal with an Asian person. We always expected deals from our Asian customers to be no-profit deals, because they will wring your neck for a low price! Most Asian customers have outstanding credit, have shopped around tons of dealerships, and throw a lowball so low that once couldn't possibly come close to doing that price!

I dunno...maybe it's different with BMW's?
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  #16  
Old 01-25-2006, 01:06 AM
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Most of the information you guys provided is excellent. The car sales business is completely different than many people think. A salesman must have very thick skin, tons of patience, and work hard before becoming successful. The turnover rate is unbelievable.

BTW, I loved the comment about car sales being the only business where people expect one to work for free! Jeez, everyone acts like it's a sin when an honest car salesperson feels entitled to compensation for those 50-70 hour work weeks! LOL
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  #17  
Old 01-25-2006, 08:34 PM
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asians

Are you all saying that a high percentge of Asians drive BMW?
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  #18  
Old 01-25-2006, 08:42 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SS
Hmmm...have you sold vehicles? My observances are slightly different from yours (and I've got tons of folks who agree with me on this!). The Asian salespeople I've noticed tend to be hard workers, and good closers. As well, the Asians, like hispanics, are pretty loyal to their own.

However, I don't see Asian, or any other salesperson making much money off a deal with an Asian person. We always expected deals from our Asian customers to be no-profit deals, because they will wring your neck for a low price! Most Asian customers have outstanding credit, have shopped around tons of dealerships, and throw a lowball so low that once couldn't possibly come close to doing that price!

I dunno...maybe it's different with BMW's?
Maybe it is different with BMWs.
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Old 01-25-2006, 08:43 PM
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Originally Posted by tvo7
Are you all saying that a high percentge of Asians drive BMW?
I think that's what's being implied.
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  #20  
Old 01-25-2006, 09:12 PM
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adrian's bmw adrian's bmw is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wwb4
I think that it all depends on the location. For example the DC metro area is a very multicultural region, and I know of several asian sales reps (who are also my friends) at several BMW dealers in my region who are overwhelmed with referral business, and generally work less hours than all of the other sales reps, but always manage to be among the top producing/selling reps month in month out. As in any sales oriented job/field "consistent" referrals are the key to one's success. In my opinion and my experience the asian public has this mastered, with their "stick to their own" mentality, because this is whom they feel most comfortable and relate to the most.

However, I'm sure in other regions of the country where it is less diverse, and no one has any advantage, it all comes down to who works the longest hours, greets the most customers, networks the best, in addition to their referral business.
Referrals are the bread and butter of sales. Referrals know your reputation, your trustworthiness, and know they'll get treated right. With this in mind, referrals are easier business than walk-in business. Don't get me wrong, I welcome walkins with open arms, but it's like making new friends- you have to get to know each other before really hanging out and making a deal.

As for Asian clientele, I count many Asian clients as some of my most valuable clients because once they know you and respect the work you do for them, they always refer all their friends and relatives without fail.

SS, I think you have a narrow minded view of Asian clientele. I would never presume that if an Asian customer walks into the showroom that it's automatically a "mini" deal. While they might attempt to negotiate a hard bargain, I firmly believe that if rapport, trust and value aren't established, any client can become the type of customer that will resort to tough negotiation tactics. Like anybody, if they're treated respectfully, courteously and professionally, they might not have to shop around after all.
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  #21  
Old 01-25-2006, 09:16 PM
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Originally Posted by adrian's bmw
Referrals are the bread and butter of sales. Referrals know your reputation, your trustworthiness, and know they'll get treated right. With this in mind, referrals are easier business than walk-in business. Don't get me wrong, I welcome walkins with open arms, but it's like making new friends- you have to get to know each other before really hanging out and making a deal.

As for Asian clientele, I count many Asian clients as some of my most valuable clients because once they know you and respect the work you do for them, they always refer all their friends and relatives without fail.

SS, I think you have a narrow minded view of Asian clientele. I would never presume that if an Asian customer walks into the showroom that it's automatically a "mini" deal. While they might attempt to negotiate a hard bargain, I firmly believe that if rapport, trust and value aren't established, any client can become the type of customer that will resort to tough negotiation tactics. Like anybody, if they're treated respectfully, courteously and professionally, they might not have to shop around after all.
Well said.
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  #22  
Old 01-26-2006, 04:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Arkady
What you need to do is ask yourself a couple of questions...

1. Can you apply the right kind of pressure on a stranger in order reach a descision without turning him/her off?
2. Can you "connect" with a person in the first 10 - 20 minutes?
3. Can you handle a job where you are always looked at as the enemy who is trying to rob innocent boys and girls?
4. Are you willing to work 12 hour days and weekends and still make minimum wage?
5. Can you stay motivated in an environment where your value to the dealership is directly proportional to the number of cars you sold last month?

and finally....
6. Do you really want to work in the only buisness where everyone expects you to work for free (zero profit)?
This is excellent. I hope you don't mind that I forwarded it to my brother-in-law who owns Dodge, Hyundai and Jeep stores and just can't find committed salespeople. He's going to use these questions in his interview process from now on. Thanks.
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  #23  
Old 01-02-2008, 01:53 AM
ValBkc ValBkc is offline
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I need an advise

Hello everyone.
Happy New Year
My name is Val.
I'm from Russia. Currently I work in New York City as a Bartender.
I've never worked as a salesperson before, but I have lots of passion for cars and I would like to get into this business.
I want to start my career in a BMW car dealership.
So I just want to ask if there is any special knowledge I need to have to get started.
What kind of personality should i have to deal effectively with the customers?
What is a main criteria on the interview?
What is the most complicated part of the business?
Any advise would be appreciated.
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  #24  
Old 01-02-2008, 10:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevarino View Post
Why does it take so long? Every time I buy a car it seems that the salesman is new. I assume there is a large turnover.

However, would you not know after only a few months as a salesmsn if you were going to make a living at it ?
My local dealership has about 10 folks who have been there at least 5 years, some of them even longer, and a smaller group of filler type sales people who seem to come and go. Nature of the biz.

My latest experience was at SFBMW with the internet sales manager who had been there 3 years. Dressed in a suit, business school graduate, very professional, low key, no nonsense type. Sells a ton of cars from what I could tell and took New Years week off.
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  #25  
Old 01-05-2008, 09:28 AM
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I am sure car sales are like any other sales type of job. It follows the 80/20 rule. 20% of the sales people get 80% of the business. You will naturally have superstars and starving people in the same dealership. It will have to do with where your leads are generated from, odviould refferal business being the best.
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