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E39 (1997 - 2003)
The BMW 5-Series (E39 chassis) was introduced in the United States as a 1997 model year car and lasted until the 2004 when the E60 chassis was released. The United States saw several variations including the 525i, 528i, 530i and 540i. -- View the E39 Wiki

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  #176  
Old 09-04-2010, 12:48 PM
Beemerz Beemerz is offline
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Jeeez. Thirty thousand miles seems low to me but I just bought my first used BMW this week so I'm new to all this. I took my new baby to a local shop that works on these that I knew had a good rep and used to know a former owner. They ended up doing a basic check and said that one of my fronts was stciking and felt overall (remaining pad etc) that I should get a new brake job (front only) sometime before this winter. He said they typically always do both rotor and pads (and all sensors) on all brake jobs. The price they quoted was roughly $500 for just the front. I asked about the mileage and he thought 30 thou between brake jobs was low unless it's either driven very hard or mostly hard city driving. My driving will be mixed but probably more on the highway end of things so I'm hoping for at least forty. In any case, this is a great thread and one I'm going to keep an eye on. Thanks all!
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  #177  
Old 09-04-2010, 12:53 PM
Beemerz Beemerz is offline
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double post. sorry about that.

Last edited by Beemerz; 09-04-2010 at 12:56 PM. Reason: double post
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  #178  
Old 09-04-2010, 03:30 PM
Burning2nd Burning2nd is offline
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Dont have enough time to read thur this book... One question i have.. Floating Or trapped Roters?
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  #179  
Old 09-04-2010, 04:29 PM
KeithS KeithS is offline
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You may want to check out my little write up on brakes and corrosion from my rotor/pad replacement today:

http://forums.bimmerforums.com/forum....php?t=1521032
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  #180  
Old 09-04-2010, 09:55 PM
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MatWiz MatWiz is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burning2nd View Post
Dont have enough time to read thur this book... One question i have.. Floating Or trapped Roters?
Chicken soup.

mw
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  #181  
Old 09-08-2010, 03:44 AM
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Just found this interesting article that I had not seen mentioned here before on why brakes don't warp ... but what really happens when they vibrate.

- Brake Roughness and Vibration: Causes and Solutions

Brake Roughness and Vibration: Causes and Solutions

The following is based on my Ford Engineering experience and applies to all makes and models of trucks and cars:

One of the most common brake system customer vehicle performance complaints is brake roughness, pulsation and vibration. As common as this complaint is very few people, including many service technicians, actually understand the true cause of it and what to do to correct it permanently. This leads to misdiagnosis, unnecessary repairs and parts replaced and the likely re-occurrence of the problem a short time later. Brake roughness can be defined as vibration that is felt in the steering wheel, brake pedal and/or seat during vehicle braking. This does not include the normal pulsation that occurs when anti-lock brakes are activated during a panic stop or when on wet, snow or ice covered roads, which can activate the anti-lock brakes.

What typically happens is the customer experiences this type of vibration and pulsation and thinks something is wrong with their brakes and then takes their vehicle into a repair facility. The customer explains the problem and the repair facility technician or service writer either takes the vehicle out for a test drive to confirm the symptoms or pulls it into the shop and starts right in on the brakes. Then they come out to the customer and inform them that their brake rotors are "warped" and they need new rotors and pads (and sometimes hubs), or they can machine the rotors on their bench lathe if there is enough rotor material remaining to meet the manufacturers minimum thickness requirements.

The problem with this diagnosis and repair procedure is that first of all is that brake rotors do not warp. The second problem is that replacing a brake rotor with a new brake rotor or machining the rotor on a bench lathe will only fix the problem temporary. The problem will almost always re-occur after a period of time, thus necessitating further repairs. Brake rotor disc thickness variation or excessive lateral runout, as well as drums that are out of round can cause vibrations and pulsations in the brake pedal and/or steering wheel. Brake lining material transfer onto the rotor can also have an effect on this as well.

Here's what really occurs: all brake rotors and hubs have an associated Lateral Runout (LRO). LRO occurs when two axes are not parallel to each other, such as the axes of the rotor and the hub or the spindle and the rotor/hub. LRO may be caused by manufacturing tolerances, improperly torqued wheel nuts (uneven or excessive torque), corrosion between the brake rotor and the hub, hub with excessive runout, worn or improperly adjusted wheel bearings or any damage or wear. This is what is commonly referred to as "warped" rotors. These so called "warped" rotors do not in and of themselves cause the vibrations and pulsations. Any machined component, such as brake rotors and hubs, are going to have manufacturing tolerances, which include runout. Typical original equipment new rotor runout specifications are in the range of 0.0015-0.002 in. while low quality aftermarket rotors can be significantly higher. In addition to excessive manufacturing tolerances, cheap, low quality aftermarket rotors can have increased impurities and porosity in the metallurgy. I recommend using either the OEM rotors or a high quality aftermarket rotor.

New rotors and hubs are machined to precision tolerances from the auto manufacturers. Aftermarket rotors and hubs are usually not machined to the same tolerances, as the aftermarket manufacturers do not know the OEM specifications, although some are much better than others. Auto manufacturers will either match mount the rotor and hubs or machine the rotor on the hub unit as an assembly. Match mounting is matching up the low spot on the brake rotor with the high spot on the hub. This match mounting process minimizes the runout of the assembled components, but is only a production process. A service technician cannot effectively determine where the high and low spots are in order to match mount the components. Machining the rotor on the hub (and/or spindle) with the proper on-vehicle machining equipment is the very best method and almost completely eliminates runout. But, if they do not effectively prevent rust and corrosion in the joint, over a period of time it will induce runout and eventually brake roughness.

What can occur over a period of time is that whatever runout is in the system coupled with improperly torqued wheel nuts and/or misadjusted or loose wheel bearings and rust and corrosion forming between the rotor and hub surface leads to increases in runout. As you drive your vehicle without using the brakes, such as on the highway, every rotation of the rotor high spot or multiple high spots contacts your brake linings in the caliper, even when you are not using the brakes and wears the high spot or multiple high spots off the rotor which causes a thin spot or multiple thin spots. Over a period of time this repeated process causes what is called Disc Thickness Variation (DTV). DTV is when the rotor thickness is not the same all the way around the rotor. DTV is typically caused by lateral runout. DTV can only be measured with very specialized laboratory testing equipment or with special on vehicle capacitance probes.

When you apply your brakes, and a brake rotor has DTV, the thick and thin spots on the rotor cause the brake pads to move in and out. This in-and-out pad motion causes increases and decreases in brake system pressure, which the driver can feel in the brake pedal. This in-and-out pad motion causes a varying brake force, which is passed to the steering wheel. As the rotor gets hot, it is much more likely to increase thickness variation, thus increasing pedal pulsations as well as steering wheel and other vehicle vibrations. This phenomenon is what many technicians refer to as "warping", however they actually think the rotor warped and needs replacement.

Typical acceptable values for DTV are around 0.0004 in. That's 4 ten thousandths of an inch! As DTV increases beyond 0.0004 in., brake pedal, steering wheel and vehicle vibrations and pulsations will almost always occur.

Replacing a rotor with excessive DTV with another new rotor will only correct the problem temporarily, because eventually the associated LRO with the new rotor will lead to DTV over a period of time, and the problem repeats itself all over again. Machining a rotor with excessive DTV on a bench lathe will only temporarily correct the problem because the rotor is being machined true to the bench lathes spindle and not the spindle on the car, plus the spindle on the bench lathe has its own runout.

The correct method is to machine the brake rotor on the vehicle using an on-vehicle brake lathe. For applications where the rotor is separate from the hub (loose rotor) make certain that both surfaces are free of rust and corrosion and be sure to put a thin layer of nickel anti-seize on the mating surfaces. This will prevent rust induced increases in LRO over a period of time. Rust can form in-between the mating surfaces and exert tremendous forces which will cause increases in tension of the wheel studs and resulting clamp load variation which creates LRO. The LRO will then eventually lead to DTV, brake roughness and vibration. For vehicles with adjustable wheel bearings, be certain to properly adjust the bearing preload prior to machining the rotor.

Brake drums still must be machined on bench lathes as there is no method to machine a drum on-vehicle. Drum brake systems are less sensitive in terms of tolerancing that can cause vibrations and pulsations. Most newer model vehicles these days have 4-wheel disc brake systems. Both front and rear rotors can be machined on-vehicle. Note that I recommend machining new rotors on vehicle as well. That way you can be 100% assured that the entire assembly (rotor, hub and spindle) is a matched and perfectly machined rotating assembly. In addition, make sure the caliper slides freely on the caliper pins or slide mechanism, which will minimize off-brake contact of the brake pads with the rotor.

The on-vehicle brake rotor machining equipment that I recommend which performs the absolute best job is the Pro-Cut On-Vehicle Brake Lathe. It is simply the absolute best on-vehicle brake lathe on the market; the competition doesn't even come close to the results achieved with the Pro-Cut. The Pro-Cut is recommended and approved by Ford, GM and Daimler-Chrysler as well as many other car companies.

I have measured finished LRO values of less than 0.0005 in. with the Pro-Cut, which is less than the tolerances on new rotors. In addition the Pro-Cut uses special cutting bits that produce the proper non-directional micro-finish. The Pro-Cut lathe attaches to the hub and is computerized in order to measure runout of the entire system automatically and compensate for it prior to machining so that a perfect cut is achieved every time. Do not allow a caliper mounted brake lathe to be used on your vehicle. Caliper mounted brake lathes mount on the caliper mounts which are machined in different planes with different cutting tools, therefore a few thousandths difference at the caliper mount will produce a finished machined rotor with runout machined in which will eventually lead to DTV and brake roughness.

Next time someone tells you your brake rotors are warped you can explain to them that brake rotors do not warp and that you want your rotors machined with a Pro-Cut On Vehicle Brake Lathe. If they don't have one then call around to find a facility that has one, or contact Pro-Cut directly at www.procutinternational.com, and they will tell you where your nearest service center is that has a Pro-Cut.


Dave Mann
Lubrication Specialist - Truck/Automotive Engineer
Society of Automotive Engineers Professional Member
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  #182  
Old 09-08-2010, 04:16 AM
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Fudman Fudman is offline
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Now THAT is a well written article exposing the inaccuracies of conventional wisdom, explaining a fairly common problem and identifying the proper solution. A GREAT POST, Bluebee!!!! Two thumbs up.
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  #183  
Old 09-08-2010, 02:51 PM
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MatWiz MatWiz is offline
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Fantastic find, Bluebee!



BTW, this:
Quote:
What can occur over a period of time is that whatever runout is in the system coupled with improperly torqued wheel nuts and/or misadjusted or loose wheel bearings and rust and corrosion forming between the rotor and hub surface leads to increases in runout. As you drive your vehicle without using the brakes, such as on the highway, every rotation of the rotor high spot or multiple high spots contacts your brake linings in the caliper, even when you are not using the brakes and wears the high spot or multiple high spots off the rotor which causes a thin spot or multiple thin spots. Over a period of time this repeated process causes what is called Disc Thickness Variation (DTV). DTV is when the rotor thickness is not the same all the way around the rotor. DTV is typically caused by lateral runout. DTV can only be measured with very specialized laboratory testing equipment or with special on vehicle capacitance probes.
This is what many people confuse with a "stuck caliper". Of course the symptoms will be worse just after applying the brakes, since the pad is still very near the rotor. After a little while the high spots of the DTV will finally cause the pad to get back further away from the rotor (into the caliper) and the vibration will subside. Instead of just doing a very good bedding to smooth the rotor, (or even just replacing the rotors!), they go and replace rotors, pads, and caliper. An expensive ordeal that could have been solved with a good bedding at zero cost.

mw
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Last edited by MatWiz; 09-08-2010 at 02:52 PM.
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  #184  
Old 12-30-2010, 12:29 PM
Westlotorn Westlotorn is offline
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Brake pads are available in 4 basic compounds and in each of those there is a variety of blends that are used to give a car very specific results. OEM BMW E39 pads are a carbon metallic blend.

On the temperature scale brake pads fall in the order below. Low Temp to high temp.

Organic Pads - Lowest Temp Rating
Ceramic Pads
Semi-Metallic Pads
Carbon Metallic Pads - Highest Temp Rating

When you decide to re design an OEM brake system you should know you might not be happy with the results. Cabon Metallic pads will handle the most heat while still giving great braking but they are abrasive on the rotors and give off a lot of brake dust. BUT they stop the car in the manner the factory designed.

IF BMW wanted you to run Ceramic materials they would increase the size of the brake system so it would work at lower temperatures that Ceramic materials like. Since they designed the car for Carbon Metallics you should stay with that type pad. Or at least be aware of the compromise you are making.

Otherwise you may be running a mountain road following a buddy's similar car and your bakes start fading while his are still rock solid.
I found Ferrodo brake pads offer the exact same OEM friction and performance on my two E39's.
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  #185  
Old 02-18-2011, 08:25 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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For the record, I came back to this thread (detailing my very first and second brake jobs) to see if I could find an answer for 02BMW530 over here:
- Quick question concerning pad wear sensors and warning lights

02BMW530 wants to both reset his red BRAKE light and disable the brake wear sensors.

The problem was twofold:
1. How to reset the red BRAKE light with the worn sensor in place
2. How to mimic a good brake wear sensor with the worn sensor

It's not something I'd do, but, it's good to know, for our tribal knowledge, that rustyzipper says that it's a normally closed circuit. He says he's been successful splicing the two brake wear sensor wires together at the junction box.

I'll ask 02BMW530 to report back with his results.
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  #186  
Old 02-18-2011, 08:37 AM
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02BMW530 02BMW530 is offline
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And that I shall do! It is a sunny 55-60 degrees today and it's only getting colder tomorrow. AutoZone has pads in stock (nothing fancy needed here!) and I'll figure something out with the sensor.

PS: I think the sensor should be made of a really smoky material, so when you wear it down it smokes like a teepee. Solves the "do I need new pads or is the sensor malfunctioning" question!


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  #187  
Old 02-18-2011, 10:50 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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02BMW530 kindly wrote up "lessons learned" when doing his front brakes which others will benefit from.

Quote:
Everything went well. I won't go step by step, the other DIYs do that just fine. This is more a "trouble spots" and "lessons learned".

Accessing the 7mm caliper bolts was perfectly easy. Throw the end of a hex key into a wrench for leverage and it was fine. My bolt threads were greased were greased before and were no problem.

But that rattle clip... Ooooh that rattle clip. That was easy enough to take off but a real pain to put back on. And I mean pain figuratively and literally. This was a 2+ person job.

Removing the caliper was easy but the brake hose length seemed to limit it's resting options. I opted to put mine on top of the rotor. The piston was easier than most cars to push back.

Pad uninstall and reinstall was the easiest I've ever done. My Jeeps had a style where you had to try to force it to wedge in between 3 sets of placement clips...grrr... But these were awesome.

We cut the pad wear sensor and removed it from the hub. We cut all the way to where it's line and the brake line (ABS sensor line?) were bolted onto the wall of the fender. We soldered the two wired together, twisted them, and then taped them together. It didn't reset the brake light, so I think my back pads were the source. I haven't, however, successfully reset the system either.

Other than that, I took it for a quick spin to start bedding the brakes. I had a pronounced "howl" and/or whine the first few stops but have since gone away. They are by NO means as grabby as the Jurids that came off. Maybe it'll come closer with time, but life goes on.

All said and done it took about two hours (45 mins alone were spent trying to solder the tiny wires together...). We weren't really in a rush, if we had been I imagine it'd be do-able in 45 mins.

Naturally, I forgot my phone to take pictures of the work but we can all imagine. As I said, the other DIYs are fantastic, and BlueBee's write up on hers was spot on.

Last edited by bluebee; 02-27-2011 at 01:56 PM.
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  #188  
Old 02-19-2011, 02:34 AM
bobdmac bobdmac is offline
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Bluebee, this is an epic thread: a personal odyssey, from your original post, when, judging by your join date, you were a newbie, and were ridiculed for excessive attention to detail and profligate tool buying, to your outing as a (gasp!) WOMAN (memorable quote: "Did anyone notice the pink shoes and shirt?") and taking barbs for being a program manager, to ultimately getting more than just grudging respect for your sheer industry, tenacity, and all around good work. I just finished reading it I'm chagrined to see how late it kept me up, but I'm glad you resurrected it. I learned a lot along the way. Full props.

Last edited by bobdmac; 02-19-2011 at 02:35 AM.
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  #189  
Old 02-19-2011, 04:32 AM
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02BMW530 02BMW530 is offline
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This is probably one of the best threads on here. She should get $0.10 per view...


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  #190  
Old 02-19-2011, 06:17 PM
MotoBMW528i MotoBMW528i is offline
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Question. Does the yellow (not red) break pad light de-illuminate by itself after replacement of brake pads and sensor or is there some reset that needs to be manually done with a tool (similar to the Peake scannig tool for check engine lights).

I just had all brake pads replaced at an Indy but the yellow brake light is still on. So now I'm trying to find out if the light needs to be manually reset or will it turn off by itself in a few days.

I've read this entire thread--4 hours--and found nothing about the sensor light. Which leads me to conclude that it automatically turns off and BB makes no mention of turning the light off herself.
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  #191  
Old 02-19-2011, 06:29 PM
MotoBMW528i MotoBMW528i is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MotoBMW528i View Post
Question. Does the yellow (not red) break pad light de-illuminate by itself after replacement of brake pads and sensor or is there some reset that needs to be manually done with a tool (similar to the Peake scannig tool for check engine lights).

I just had all brake pads replaced at an Indy but the yellow brake light is still on. So now I'm trying to find out if the light needs to be manually reset or will it turn off by itself in a few days.

I've read this entire thread--4 hours--and found nothing about the sensor light. Which leads me to conclude that it automatically turns off and BB makes no mention of turning the light off herself.
Ok. I'll answer this one myself.

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...2&postcount=11

Leave door open
Turn key to Position 1 for 30 seconds. The yellow break pad light turns off itself.

That's it. LOL
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  #192  
Old 02-20-2011, 09:39 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobdmac View Post
Bluebee, this is an epic thread: a personal odyssey, from your original post, when, judging by your join date, you were a newbie, and were ridiculed for excessive attention to detail and profligate tool buying
You know Bob, I had forgotten what an "epic journey" this thread was.

As you pointed out, this is probably my first thread because it was started on March 2nd and I only joined in March of 2008 (at best, one day earlier).

Think of that! (We should all go back to our first thread to see what a difference there is between then, and now!)

Following your lead, I just now also re-read the entire thread, from start to finish (oh my, how styupid I was then ... it's really embarrassing reading).
  • I didn't know about Bimmerfest (google brought me here)
  • I had no idea how to look up part numbers (google found realoem)
  • I was clueless where best to buy parts (Kragen? Sheesh!)
  • I didn't even know I had an "E39", nor what engine I had
  • I had no tools (and what I had, was borrowed ... since then bought)
  • I didn't even understand anything about specifications or "warp"
  • And, worst of all, I was absolutely atrocious at finding good DIYs
In addition:
  • I was (repeatedly) told to clean my car ...
  • I was often told to stop overanalyzing the job ...
  • And even ordered to "just get out and do it!" :
  • Unfortunately, I asked some really dumb questions ...
  • And, I compiled absolutely lousy summaries
  • Embarrassingly, I assumed some really dumb things
  • And, I got ridiculed for a whole bunch of those!
  • Yet I got expert advice that helped me past every hurdle, one by one!
I'd say this thread represents (pretty much) the whole gamut!
  • It took about ten posts before anybody even responded helpfully
  • Of the long timers, Michel (mmm635) was the first to even begin answer my myriad questions!
  • But, you guys started, one by one, entering the fray to point me in the right direction ...
  • MatWiz (now affectionately known as "DanWiz, the mattress wizard') was one of the first long timers to offer anything resembling real advice (along with a few good-natured digs) ...
  • RyanM sternly admonished me to just get out there and do it!
  • dvsgene & KeithS offered belated advice almost 50 posts into this epic
  • bmw_n00b13 waited until post 119 reaffirming the "clean your damn car" admonishment!
  • truelies popped in at 120 for quick rotor advice
  • TheStig posted a great specification chart from the TIS at post #124.
  • I learned the truth of 'warp' right around then ... (oh my, how dumb I was) ...
  • Jason5driver came in at #140 asking for a summary (because the thread was so confusing!)
  • And I couldn't even summarize the relevant specs until post #150!
  • Fudman answered one of my original-post questions at #166!
  • And, where, oh where, were Cam & Bill & Q & Black & Edgy & Max, etc., when I needed them most! (jk)
In the end ...
  • I did what I felt I needed to do to get the job done.
  • I ignored the barbs and jokes (joining in when I thought I could add humor)
  • I tried (as best I could at the time) to be responsive to everyone
  • My nature is to point out where things could have been improved, so I did.
And, in the final tally, I (think I) came a long way (from newbie to snobbie!)

Thanks to all of you wonderful people on Bimmerfest!


Last edited by bluebee; 02-20-2011 at 09:48 AM.
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  #193  
Old 02-20-2011, 10:00 AM
bobdmac bobdmac is offline
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Well, Bluebee, one thing hasn't changed. Your posts are on average about 5 times longer than anybody else's––hah!
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  #194  
Old 02-23-2011, 10:37 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobdmac View Post
Your posts are on average about 5 times longer than anybody else's
Only five?

My post also (probably):
  • ... are more highly cross referenced than most others
  • ... contain more photographs and diagrams than most others
  • ... are more highly researched than most others
  • ... are more complete (from start to finish) than most others
  • ... etc.
And, as a result of that ... I'd wager (but I do not know) ...

That my threads are probably more visited (over time) and more useful (overall) than most other threads.

BTW, as I always strive for reproducible data ... is there actually a way to see a ranking of any particular poster's thread views or other rankings (to see if I'm spouting horseradish or not)?
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  #195  
Old 03-28-2011, 09:33 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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For the record, folks over in the E60 crowd are trying to figure out rotor wear:
- rotor thickness

Which reminded me of my (failed so far) attempt at figuring out anecdotally from the tribe how many miles we get per thousandth of an inch of rotor wear in typical driving with typical rotors and pads.

For the record, I'll repeat my request to others to list their rotor wear numbers when they replace their brake pads & rotors:

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
I never got any takers on my attempt at gathering anecdotal evidence for how many thousandths of an inch is worn per thousand miles ...
- How to check & replace your BMW front disc brakes and rotors

But, with my (unproven) anecdotal 'study' of one, I'd say he'd get around 24,000 miles on that rotor to wear it .024" further.

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  #196  
Old 03-29-2011, 04:02 AM
fedup fedup is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ben Carufel View Post
OH. MY. GOD.

With all due respect -- are you an engineer with tons of time on your hands??

I have *never* seen anyone turn a brake job into an hours-long research experiment.

In all honesty, I am torn between wanting to respect you and wanting to ridicule you.

I'm going to go with respect, because you have the tenacity of no mortal I've ever encountered...

Lol
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  #197  
Old 05-03-2011, 10:40 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
For the record, this E46 thread today was discussing where to lube a BMW brake:
- E46 (1999 - 2006) > BMW Brake Pad Installation Lubricant?

Where BMW TIS 34.11.00 describes the four wheel brake job:
- BMW_TIS_34-11-00-brake_linings.pdf
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  #198  
Old 05-08-2011, 01:17 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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From this thread today:
- E46 (1999 - 2006) > What is the Min rotor thickness 325i

We find the following rotor-minimum-thickness tribal knowledge:

Quote:
Originally Posted by TerraPhantm View Post
For all BMWs, the minimum thickness is 1.6mm less than the starting thickness
Interesting.

While my E39 Bentley manuals state my rear rotors start at ~20mm (0.787 inches), after a dozen checks, my new rear rotor measurements actually came out to 19.8mm or actually 0.7800 to 0.7805 inches (amazingly they were all well within a half thousandth of each other).

Subtracting 1.6mm from the starting thickness of 19.8mm, would make the minimum thickness 18.2mm which is pretty darn close to the 18.4 stamped on the side.





Notice 0.8mm "per friction ring side" times two friction rings is the 1.6 mm.
Notice if the rotors had actually started off at 20.0mm, then subtracting the 1.6mm would net us the stamped number of 18.4mm.

At least the math lines up.

Last edited by bluebee; 05-08-2011 at 01:21 AM.
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  #199  
Old 05-10-2011, 06:38 PM
UsedBits UsedBits is offline
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Location: Central Arkansas
 
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Mein Auto: 2002 540iA with sport pkg
After reading just the first 80 posts in this thread, I'm too afraid to tackle replacing my rotors/pads. I have 11 days from today to make a final decision - that's the day members from Arkansas Bimmers are to come over to help me do the job.
__________________

2002 e39 (540iA) with factory 'sport package' modified with:
'03 fr. and r. bumpers, front air ducts, and spoiler
18" Staggered MPars (style 37)
Dinan exhaust
shorter springs
European center console arm rest
VECTOR radar detector (non-working)

....-------------------.
[ /.....................\ ]
.|(oOO)\(lll)°(lll)/(OOo)|
. \o\0=======|=======0/o/
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  #200  
Old 05-11-2011, 02:44 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UsedBits View Post
After reading just the first 80 posts in this thread, I'm too afraid to tackle replacing my rotors/pads.
Ah, if I can do it, you certainly can!

I see that you're going to take the plunge!
- E39 (1997 - 2003) > Tools for replacing disk rotors and pads

Good for you!

See my response here.

Also note JimLev posted a nice picture in that thread of where to lube the calipers:
Quote:
I got mine from BAV Auto, it's Sta-Lube synthetic grease.
I don't think there is any that will not get partially washed off. You probably have noticed what grease is left is imbedded with brake pad dust and becomes hard.
It scrapes off pretty easy.
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Last edited by bluebee; 05-11-2011 at 05:40 PM.
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