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E39 (1997 - 2003)
The BMW 5-Series (E39 chassis) was introduced in the United States as a 1997 model year car and lasted until the 2004 when the E60 chassis was released. The United States saw several variations including the 525i, 528i, 530i and 540i. -- View the E39 Wiki

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  #1  
Old 07-18-2008, 06:50 AM
stinkpalmd stinkpalmd is offline
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E39 Front Brake Caliper Rebuild DIY

Hello folks,

My 2001 530i had the infamous steering wheel shimmy/shake and the culprit was actually a sticky front driver's side brake, so I decided to rebuild both of my front calipers and replace the rotors. Below is my first DIY written here, so bear with me. I hope it helps a lot of people. It is really not a hard process - the hardest part is just getting the caliper off!

1) Jack up the front end of your car and remove both front wheels. You can just rebuild one side of your car, but I thought it smart to just rebuild both fronts and replace the rotors.

2) Before removing the caliper, get access to your brake master cylinder by removing the cabin air filter housing under your hood. In Figure 1, A is the small metal clip that you must undo to pull the filter cover off. Remove the filter from inside. B is the set of plastic clips you must undo and pull the airway into your cabin away from the filter box. C is the hood sensor you must clip out. D is the retaining metal clip that must be pulled out. Then you can remove the entire filter box and get to the brake master cylinder.


Figure 1

3) First part of removing the caliper is removing the anti-rattle spring clip (see A in Figure 2) by prying it off of the caliper. It might jump out, so be careful.


Figure 2

4) To remove the caliper, you may have to compress the piston back into its bore by using a C Clamp - one side on the back side of the caliper closest to the engine and one side on the brake pad facing the outside of the car. Figure 3 shows a picture of the front driver's caliper from above. A is the brake pad wear sensor (remove this carefully by pulling outward from the base of the plastic), B is the bleeder screw, C is the caliper guide bolt, D is the brake line coming into the caliper, and E is the bolt connecting the brake pad carrier to the steering knuckle.


Figure 3

5) After removing the brake pad wear sensor, it is a good idea to loosen the brake line coming into the caliper - it is difficult to loosen the brake line once the caliper is off. I believe it was a 14mm wrench.

6) Remove caliper guide bolts with a 7mm hex wrench. You can't get much torque with a hex key, so a rubber mallet can be your best friend on this project (Figure 4).


Figure 4

7) Remove the caliper from the brake disc. It may require a good amount of jiggling back and forth. If it really doesn't want to come out, you probably didn't compress the piston enough to get the pads over the outer ridge in your rotors. Like I said, this can be hard and frustrating, so if you're having trouble, take a break and come back to it. You really can't be too rough on the car at this point, especially if you're replacing the rotors.

8) As you can see in Figure 5, my caliper is off and the dust boot (circled) around the piston has seen better days, allowing dirt & brake dust to settle onto the piston. The brake line (circle) is already loosened, so to remove it from the caliper, you hold the line while you twist the caliper around in circles. The brake line may drip for a little bit, but it will stop at some point.


Figure 5

9) Take the caliper to your bench or wherever and it is now time to get the piston out of there. There are different ways to do this but I really think the quickest way is compressed air. Be careful with it, as compressed air can make it fly out of the piston bore. Only use around 20-30psi - put a piece of wood opposite the piston where it will come out (Figure 6). Insert the compressed air bit into where the brake line comes in and the piston should come out with a nice loud pop.


Figure 6

10) Figure 7 shows all of the elements of the caliper - the piston (A), the caliper guide bolts (B), the old piston dust boot (C), and the piston bore's old inner seal (D). A caliper rebuild kit provides you with a new dust boot and inner seal. Remove the inner seal carefully with a skinny wooden dowel or VERY carefully with a tiny flat head screwdriver. You do not want to scratch the inside walls of the caliper bore. Clean the groove where the seal was and then lube your new inner seal and put into place


Figure 7

11) Figure 8 shows both of my pistons cleaned up and lubed with brake fluid. Lube both the piston and the caliper bore with either silicone assembly lube or just brake fluid. I was lucky in that there wasn't significant corrosion or pitting on the piston walls. If your pistons are severely corroded or pitted, you may as well buy re-manufactured calipers. I used steel wool and a little bit of fine sandpaper to grind off some of the surface corrosion.


Figure 8

12) Once your piston is cleaned & lubed, pull the new dust boot over your piston so that it is configured like Figure 9. This allows you to seat the bottom part of the dust boot into the caliper before you start pushing the piston into the caliper. Picture of dust boot being seated into the caliper is shown in Figure 10.


Figure 9


Figure 10

13) With dust boot seated into caliper, you can press the piston into the caliper bore. Some people use a wooden dowel and hammer it carefully into the caliper, but I used the caliper piston tool that we had (Figure 11 shows a similar tool to the one I used). When the piston gets pushed in, the other seal of the dust boot snaps right into place on the little ridge in the piston.


Figure 11

14) Figure 12 shows the piston back into the caliper with the new dust boot seated properly. It is time to re-attach the caliper and bleed your brakes!


Figure 12

15) The re-assembly of everything is pretty much exactly in reverse. Have patience when bleeding your brakes when everything is back on. You have to refill your calipers and it takes a little more fluid than you expect. My recommendation is to buy more brake fluid than you think you'll need. I bled in the order Bentley recommends - rear passenger, rear drivers, front passenger, front drivers.


I hope this is helpful - I borrowed a couple pictures from people since they are better than the ones I took. If anyone has any questions, I'd be happy to field them. It really wasn't a bad project - no surprises. Once you have the caliper off, it's just a matter of being careful and cleaning/lubing everything thoroughly.

Last edited by stinkpalmd; 07-18-2008 at 06:58 AM.
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  #2  
Old 07-18-2008, 07:07 AM
cn90 cn90 is offline
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Good Job, Nice Post!

What is the cost for parts (seals O-rings etc.)?

I personally buy rebuilt caliper because:
- I do not have time to do the rebuild
- Warranty...peace of mind.
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Old 07-18-2008, 07:22 AM
stinkpalmd stinkpalmd is offline
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cn90 - thanks!

ATE brand rebuild kit (new inner seal and dustboot) was $12.50 online, so for both fronts it was $25. I think the dealership wanted around $28-30 for just one kit.

I had some rebuilt calipers quoted at a couple places and it would've been about $150 plus core for two. I may still do that at some point since I am sure my pistons will corrode too much at some point, but for now I had the time to rebuild and I wanted to bleed my system anyway.
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Old 07-18-2008, 10:56 AM
BoombasticSloth BoombasticSloth is offline
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Excellent post OP
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Old 07-18-2008, 11:06 AM
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Fantastic DIY post OP! Many thanks!
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Old 07-18-2008, 11:35 AM
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  #7  
Old 08-19-2008, 10:08 PM
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Being the nice son that I am, I told my dad I'd do his front brakes if he purchased the parts (rotors and pads). He's got an '02 540i-6.

Of course, my hand slips when I am putting the new pad in place (inner pad), and I tear the piston seal with the metal bracked riveted to the pad... Everything back together and I can't get a firm pedal.

So, your re-build DIY will come in handy!

Do you have a link to the site where you bought the parts?

Thanks!

- Mike
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  #8  
Old 08-20-2008, 09:53 AM
stinkpalmd stinkpalmd is offline
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Mike,

I personally bought my rebuild kits from Pelican Parts because I was ordering some other stuff from them at the same time:

Part # is 34111157037 for the fronts and 34211163648 or 34211164440 for the rears. Fronts were $12.50 a piece - don't know if you just want to repair the one side or you could try to do both for piece of mind.
http://www.pelicanparts.com/bmw/cata..._pg2.htm#item9

Autohaus Arizona also has them even cheaper, something like $10 a pop:
http://www.autohausaz.com


Good luck!

-Ted
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Old 08-20-2008, 03:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stinkpalmd View Post
Mike,

I personally bought my rebuild kits from Pelican Parts because I was ordering some other stuff from them at the same time:

Part # is 34111157037 for the fronts and 34211163648 or 34211164440 for the rears. Fronts were $12.50 a piece - don't know if you just want to repair the one side or you could try to do both for piece of mind.
http://www.pelicanparts.com/bmw/cata..._pg2.htm#item9

Autohaus Arizona also has them even cheaper, something like $10 a pop:
http://www.autohausaz.com


Good luck!

-Ted
Thanks for the reply. On further investigation... I got pretty lucky.

The car (2002 540i-6) went to the dealer last week for service. I didn't know they topped off all of the fluids - including the brakes. Since the brake fluid reservoir is buried under the cabin air filter, I never noticed.

Yesterday, I replaced the front brakes (at night) with the car jacked up on the front end. When the car was dropped, I immediately got in and pressed on the brakes as I rolled backwards... and that is when I noticed the fluid puddle under the car from where it was parked.

Thinking about it last night... I remembered slipping when installing the brake pad, so I thought I ripped the seal... therefore my post from last night.

This morning, I pulled the wheel off and it was dry. But, there was fluid coming down from inside the wheel well. I checked the reservoir... and it was full. Oh crap! That was it! When I pushed the piston back in, the fluid (trying to go back into a recently topped-off reservoir) went out the small vent hole and pooled in the fender liner. When I lowered the car, it leaked to the driveway.

Everything is fine. No need to re-build anything. The brakes work great.

- Mike
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  #10  
Old 08-21-2008, 03:36 AM
Jase007 Jase007 is offline
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Great DIY.

I've rebuilt lots of calipers but I replaced mine recently with remanufactured ones from pelicanparts.com b/c they sell nugeon (sp) re-mfg'd calipers. My original caliper pistons were rusted pitted on the outside bores that they would have torn the new seals if I rebuilt. 164,xxx miles on calipers was enough to warrant replacement. New to me calipers were re-mfg'd corectly and pistons were clean / smooth and slid well in the caliper housing.

Good service and good quality rebuild ... would recomend them as a vendor / product.

After core return ... cost about $80 per side.

Nice job.
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  #11  
Old 08-22-2008, 01:52 PM
stinkpalmd stinkpalmd is offline
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Mike - I'm glad you figured out the problem and didn't have to go through the rebuild.

Jason - thanks for the compliments. I also will probably get some re-man'd calipers... just moved, so my bank account isn't stellar right now... perhaps next Spring.
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Old 10-03-2008, 02:09 PM
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Great writeup!

One question. When brake line is disconnected, do I just let the the oil drip out without plugging / clamping the line? Is it gonna drain the fluid in that line completely? And will it cause air to be trapped inside the system?

And I assume you need to do the complete bleeding on 4 calipers, right?
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Old 10-03-2008, 02:53 PM
stinkpalmd stinkpalmd is offline
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flyingmachine,

Thanks for the compliment.

Yeah, you can let the brake fluid drip out - it will eventually stop after 10-15 minutes or so. It doesn't let enough out that you should worry about the brake fluid level getting low. I think I had them disconnected overnight and I was not worried. It lets a little bit of air into the system, but nothing significant. You should do a bleed of all four corners anyway, so I didn't see that as an issue. Obviously, reconnect both brake lines (or just the one if you're just doing one side) before you start bleeding the system.

Good luck - let me know if you have any other questions!

-Ted
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Old 10-03-2008, 03:27 PM
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+ 1,000,000 for an excellent post.
Thanks for sharing
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Old 10-10-2008, 06:46 AM
truelies truelies is offline
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stinkpalmd,

After I rebuild the Caliper, must I do the brake bleeding? Can I just connect the brake line back?
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:12 AM
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Unfortunately, you must bleed the brakes if you "opened" the system (removed a fluid line, removed a caliper, swapped master cylinders, etc...). Once everything is back together, you bleed it.

It shouldn't take more than 10-15 minutes if you have someone helping (the slowest part is getting the car in the air with all four wheels off).

- Mike
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Old 10-10-2008, 07:18 AM
truelies truelies is offline
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I don't know anything about bleeding. Do I need to buy some bleeder kits?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Emission View Post
Unfortunately, you must bleed the brakes if you "opened" the system (removed a fluid line, removed a caliper, swapped master cylinders, etc...). Once everything is back together, you bleed it.

It shouldn't take more than 10-15 minutes if you have someone helping (the slowest part is getting the car in the air with all four wheels off).

- Mike
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Old 10-10-2008, 08:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by truelies View Post
I don't know anything about bleeding. Do I need to buy some bleeder kits?
No need to buy a bleeder kit. Do you have any friends who are car savvy and would help you for 30 min?

Basically, you get the car in the air and remove the tires. Have an assistant sit in the car and put pressure on the brake pedal. Starting with the right-rear brake, you open the bleeder valve with a flared-wrench (usually 12mm or so) and let some fluid bleed out into a container (use a clear vinyl hose to direct it). The helper will have to gently pump the brakes to get the fluid going. When the fluid comes out solid - no air bubbles - you close the valve. Then you do the left-rear, front-right, and front-left (in that order). It goes pretty quickly with a helper.

You can also buy a one-man bleeder (vacuum or pressure) and DIY alone. I really suggest asking a friend who has done it to help you out.

You may be able to drive the car without bleeding the brakes. The pedal will be soft and squishy, at best. drive straight to a shop and have them bleed them for you.

- Mike
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'86 Porsche 911 Turbo 4MT


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Old 10-10-2008, 08:27 AM
stinkpalmd stinkpalmd is offline
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truelies,

+1 on everything Emission suggested. If you don't bleed your system, your brakes will be squishy & highly unsafe!! Besides, it is a good idea to bleed your brakes every once in a while anyway. It takes very little in the way of spending and time, so why not.

Good luck!
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Old 10-10-2008, 09:40 AM
truelies truelies is offline
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For the bleeding, do I need to jack all four wheels up? If so, I need to go to buy an other pair of jack stand.



Quote:
Originally Posted by stinkpalmd View Post
truelies,

+1 on everything Emission suggested. If you don't bleed your system, your brakes will be squishy & highly unsafe!! Besides, it is a good idea to bleed your brakes every once in a while anyway. It takes very little in the way of spending and time, so why not.

Good luck!
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Old 10-10-2008, 10:10 AM
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rivercity rivercity is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by truelies View Post
For the bleeding, do I need to jack all four wheels up? If so, I need to go to buy an other pair of jack stand.
Yep, you have to raise your car on all four corners, because it's nearly impossible to get to the brake line nut to bleed your system without removing your tires.

BTW, great write up "Stinkpalmd".......
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Old 10-10-2008, 01:43 PM
stinkpalmd stinkpalmd is offline
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truelies,

You don't have to have all four wheels off the ground at the same time. There is no need to buy more jack stands - if you only have two jack stands, just do one corner at a time. You can lift one corner off the ground, remove the wheel and get access to the bleeder screw to bleed that brake. Once that corner is done, put the wheel back on and move to the next corner. Order is rear passenger, rear driver, front passenger, front driver.

Good luck.
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  #23  
Old 10-10-2008, 01:50 PM
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great DIY.

Note on bleeding, I think you must cycle the ABS/DSC unit to get air out/clean oil through. This can be done via GT test set. I would like someone to confirm or deny because I am really not sure.
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Old 10-14-2008, 08:37 AM
truelies truelies is offline
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So I only need to use the original bmw jack without jack stand? This will make thing easy! What's the order of caliper rebuild? First rebuild two front, install two front clipers back, then do bleed?


Quote:
Originally Posted by stinkpalmd View Post
truelies,

You don't have to have all four wheels off the ground at the same time. There is no need to buy more jack stands - if you only have two jack stands, just do one corner at a time. You can lift one corner off the ground, remove the wheel and get access to the bleeder screw to bleed that brake. Once that corner is done, put the wheel back on and move to the next corner. Order is rear passenger, rear driver, front passenger, front driver.

Good luck.
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  #25  
Old 10-26-2008, 03:02 PM
truelies truelies is offline
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HI. I found one for compressed air bit, here is the link:

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/...10000003+90401

Can this one work? Maybe I can use a bike air pump?
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