Welcome to Bimmerfest -- The #1 Online Community for BMW related information! Please enjoy the discussion forums below and share your experiences with the 200,000 current, new and past BMW owners. The forums are broken out by car model and into other special interest sections such as BMW European Delivery and a special forum to voice your questions to the many BMW dealers on the site to assist our members!

Please follow the links below to help get you started!

Go Back   Bimmerfest - BMW Forums > BMW Model Discussions > 5 Series > E39 (1997 - 2003)

E39 (1997 - 2003)
The BMW 5-Series (E39 chassis) was introduced in the United States as a 1997 model year car and lasted until the 2004 when the E60 chassis was released. The United States saw several variations including the 525i, 528i, 530i and 540i. -- View the E39 Wiki

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-28-2009, 08:29 AM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 20,434
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
DIY - BMW E39 Oil & Filter Change (vacuum extraction method)

Step-by-step DIY for a 2002 E39 (BMW 525i) vacuum extraction oil change
... UPDATED AS NEEDED - PLEASE SUGGEST IMPROVEMENTS (so others benefit) ...

TOOLS:
- 36 mm 6-point socket wrench (required to remove the oil filter housing, normal oil filter sockets are not deep enough)
- 17 mm socket wrench (if you plan on also draining oil out of the engine oil drain pan)
- Torque wrench (18 foot pounds, 25 Nm, for both the oil filter housing & the the engine oil drain plug)
- Vacuum extractor (I don't recommend my Motive Power Extractor; many successfully use the Mityvac 7201 or 7400)
- Screw-cap two-gallon clear plastic containers (for transport of the old recycled motor oil)
- Nitrile gloves and shop towels and an oil pan (if you're going to also remove the 17mm engine-oil drain plug)
Hint: Measure the length of the plastic extractor hose (just in case); see reasons why here.

PARTS:
- Oil, 6.9 quarts for the I6, 8 quarts for the V8 (Hint: Buy oil by quality, cold/hot viscosity, type, and cost, in that order, as described below.)
- Oil filter, most recommend Mahle, Mann, or Hengst (I used an STP filter but people suggested German filters instead)
- Four-inch rubber O-ring for the plastic housing (usually comes with the oil filter)
- Copper compression gasket for the 17mm drain plug (usually comes with the oil filter)
Hint: File a groove or cut at an angle the bottom of the hard plastic vacuum extraction hose that bottoms out on the engine oil pan so as to break suction.

LOCATIONS:
- Dip stick and tube (drivers side, engine compartment, top)
- Oil filter and housing (driver side, engine compartment, top)
- Oil drain plug and gasket (passenger side, bottom of engine)
Note: Extraction will likely get a quarter quart more oil out of your engine than will conventional gravity methods.
Hint: Prominently mark the 6.9 or 8 quart level on the vacuum extractor container before use.

EXTRACTION METHOD OIL CHANGE (some people say extraction alone doesn't remove sediments):
0. Everyone warms up their BMW for the oil change and then parks on level ground
1. Some check the oil level in the engine & mark the extractor tank (so you know how much you sucked out)
3. A few let the BMW cool slightly (about 5 or 10 minutes) so you won't get burned
3. Most gather shop towels around the oil filter housing (to catch drips)
4. Some mark the oil-filter-housing position relative to the engine with whiteout (some say there is a green dot)
5. Some remove the oil-filler cap (to reduce reverse suction) & visibly check for sludge inside & on the cap
6. Remove the oil dipstick (and note the level as you will expect to remove at least that much oil into your containers)
7. With a 36mm socket, remove the oil filter housing & oil filter (most oil-filter wrenches won't be deep enough)
VACUUM EXTRACTION ...
8. Clamp the vacuum extractor tube & pump the vacuum 10 or 15 strokes (about 10 inches of mercury on the Motive)
9. Place the vacuum extractor intake hose into the outside ring of the oil-filter housing
10. Release the hose clamp & suck out as much oil from the oil-filter housing as you can (about 1/2 quart)
11. Again clamp the vacuum extractor hose and pump suction (about 10 or so pumps to about 10 inches of Hg)
12. Run the vacuum extractor thin hose down the dipstick tube 'till it bottoms (about 2 1/2 feet)
13. Release the vacuum extractor hose clamp and watch motor oil slowly flow into the vacuum extractor container
14. Wait ... wait ... wait ... wait ... wait ... wait ... wait ... (15 minutes or even 30 minutes or more)
15. Check on progress; pump the hand pump another half-dozen times to encourage the slow flow
16. At some point, you hear a sucking sound for a few minutes & you see bubbles in your vacuum tubing
17. It's human nature to fiddle with the hose up and down slightly to prove to yourself all the oil is really out
18. The dirty oil in the vacuum extractor container should be close to your previously marked 6.9-quart level
19. If different, mark the highest level of dirty oil obtained (which is why you checked the oil level before starting)
20. Remove the vacuum extractor tube from the dip-stick tube & replace the oil dip stick
GRAVITY DRAINING ... (skip these steps if you're not also draining oil)
21. Chock the rear, jack the front, & place on 2 jack stands (placed at the front jackpads)
22. Place an oil pan under the 17 mm drain plug on the bottom of the engine (passenger side)
23. Remove the 17 mm drain plug & allow remaining oil (and sediments) to drip into the oil pan
24. Replace the plug's copper compression washer & torque to 18 foot pounds (25 Nm)
25. Raise the front slightly to remove the jack stands, lower the car, & remove wheel chocks
26. Pour drained oil into the vacuum extractor container for eventual recycling
27. Remove the old oil filter from the oil filter housing cap
REASSEMBLE & REFILL ...
28. Lubricate the new 0-ring with a drop or two of new motor oil
29. Remove the old rubber 0-ring from the oil filter housing cap & replace with the new (lubricated) 0-ring
30. Add about a half quart of motor oil to the outside concentric circle of the oil filter housing
31. Check that the oil filter does not have a direction (most install label side up but the E39 filter is directionless)
32. Screw the oil filter housing (along with the new oil filter attached) onto its engine mounting
33. Reattach the oil filter housing to the engine, hand tight until it bottoms out (check previous position marks)
34. With a torque wrench and 36mm socket, torque the oil filter housing to 18 foot pounds (25 Nm)
35. Pour the other half quart of motor oil into the engine via the engine oil filler hole (a funnel may be useful)
36. Pour five (5) more quarts of new motor oil into the engine oil filler hole
37. Temporarily replace the engine oil-filler cap and start the engine & run for a minute or two
38. Check for leaks and check the oil level on the dipstick (it often is just about a quart low)
39. Remove the engine oil-filler cap and top up the oil with the last quart as needed
40. Replace the engine oil-filler cap & run the engine for a few minutes to check for leaks
CLEAN & RECYCLE ...
41. Clean up and recycle the old oil (often you can just pour the old oil into a bulk recycling depot)
42. Recycle the old oil containers (most people say to remove the caps but I have no idea why)
43. If desired, send a sample of old oil to be analyzed ($20) for condition & contaminants
Note: Most install the oil filter directionally, with the brand-name writing up, facing the top of the engine.
Note: There are valid arguments whether sediments are fully removed with the extraction method.

RESET SERVICE INTERVAL LIGHT: (procedure is for 2001 and later BMW E39 models):
0. Make sure the ignition key is not in the ignition, i.e., the ignition is OFF (position 0);
1. Press and hold the trip odometer button (located to the left in the instrument cluster);
2. While holding the trip odometer button, turn the ignition key to ACCESSORY (position 1);
3. Keep the trip odometer button pressed for about 5 seconds until you see "OIL SERVICE" or "INSPECTION" with "RESET" or "RE" in the display (on vehicles with the "High" cluster, you will also see the amount of fuel in liters remaining until the next scheduled service interval);
4. Let up on the trip odometer button & then again press down on the button and hold for another 5 seconds until "RESET" or "RE" flashes;
5. While "RESET" or "RE" is flashing, let up on the trip odometer button and press it down briefly to reset the service interval indicator (SII);
6. If successful, after the display has shown the new service interval, "END SIA" will appear in the display for approximately 2 seconds.
Note: If "RESET" or "RE" does not flash, then you have not met the minimum fuel consumption level and resetting is not needed (nor is it possible).

MOTOR OIL (Choose motor oil by (a) quality, (b) cold start, (c) viscosity, (d) type, & (e) cost (in that order) - never by brand or hype!):
a) QUALITY: Perhaps the most contentious of oil-selection issues shouldn't be an issue, because quality selection is (almost) as simple as reading the can.
- The problem is B
MW specifies BMW LL-01 rated oil for most BMWs like mine (or LL04 which exceeds BMW LL-01 specifications) which is listed on the can of very few motor oils readily available in the USA (e.g., the only Mobil-1 that is approved is the Mobil1 SAE 0w40 variety; and you might be able to find German-made Castrol Syntec SAE 0w30 European Formula if you're resourceful, or even Pentospeed SAE 0W30, or Pennzoil Platinum European Formula Ultra SAE 5W-30, or Valvoline SynPower SAE 5W-30, etc. For more choices, please see the attached document listing the available LL-01/LL-04 motor oils available for sale in the USA.) Strictly speaking, LL-01/LL-04 is all you need to know about quality (unless you can't find LL-01/LL-04 rated oil easily). Never assume a brand name automatically equates to the desired quality. It doesn't. Never did. Never will.
- If you can't find LL-01 (or LL-04) rated oil, then some will tell you any fully synthetic oil rated ACEA A3/B3 or better meets BMW specifications; but again, the problem is finding an oil locally available that has ACEA A3/B3 printed on the can.
- Otherwise, historically, at least in the United States, the main reliable measure of quality has been the American Petroleum Institute (API) "Service" rating (buy API SL for older BMWs or API SM or better for newer BMWs) printed on every can of oil sold in the US. This more readily available API quality designation is chronological, i.e., SA, SB, SC, SD, SE, SF, SG, SH, SI, SJ, SK, SL, & SM. Over time, this API quality designation moved higher and higher in the alphabet as more and more problems are specified and overcome by the petroleum engineers (note SA is unspecified, and note each specification exceeds the prior specification).
- Note that anyone who says "use Castrol" or "get Mobil1", without suggesting the BMW or ACEA or API quality rating, isn't providing enough information to make the right quality decision for you; brand and price and label hype are meaningless for this purpose (for example, even some BMW-branded oils don't meet BMW specifications for M cars).

b) COLD START: Depending on where you live, get an appropriate Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) winter (W) rating. Bear in mind, the SAE W rating only holds true for the first few minutes no matter what climate you live in. This rating is probably the least understood of all the motor oil descriptors, but, since most wear occurs at startup, it's an important measure. Since engine oil viscosity decreases logarithmically with temperature, the SAW W rating of, say "SAE 10W", tells you that the oil "acts like" a straight SAE 10 weight oil would act at 0 degrees Fahrenheit (F). The point is that it is NEVER an SAE 10 weight oil; it just acts like an SAE 10 would at 0 degrees F (the point is before the engine is warmed up). After the engine is warm (212 degrees F) the SAE W rating is meaningless. It is important to understand that a straight 30 weight oil acts exactly the same at engine temperatures as does a 5W30, or 10W30, or 15W30 motor oil. It is also important to understand the logarithmic decrease in viscosity still applies at all temperatures below 212 F, even though the only listed temperature is the 0 degrees F W rating. See included charts for more details.
c) VISCOSITY: Depending on engine factors, you'll choose a warmed-up SAE oil viscosity (measured as kinematic or Saybolt) that suits you and your engine. Just pick a warmed-up viscosity that your owners manual lists as an option. That's pretty much it. People make a much bigger issue of selecting the warmed-up viscosity than they need to. In my humble opinion, if you don't already know, before you got here, exactly which warmed-up viscosity you prefer, then simply choose the warmed-up viscosity by one of the other factors below this one in the selection criteria. Bear in mind, it is reputed the greater the spread between the SAE W rating and the SAE warmed-up rating (measured at 212° F), the greater the tendency of the oil to carbonize in your engine. If that is true, the simplest advice is to lean toward the closest multi-weight spread listed in your owners manual.
d) TYPE: Almost all BMW posters recommended synthetic motor oil for longevity, reduced wear and tear on gears, reduced incidence of oil oxidation, and lower sludge formation (as compared with similar quality traditional motor oils); but there are always tradeoffs, not the least of which are price considerations.
e) COST: Duh. As low as you can get. Buy Internet. Buy bulk. Stock ahead. If you buy good-quality (as measured by the API or BMW rating) oil, brand is nearly meaningless (see Consumer Reports' canonical diatribe on motor oil quality consistency over time).
Note: There is a LOT more to say about motor oils, e.g., see this from TheStig; or listen to Andrew-Debbie who tell us, among other things, "Many M cars specify Castrol TWS 10W-60" & "BMW-branded oil is probably re-branded German Castrol" Syntec 0W-30 European Formula & that other grades of Castrol easily found in the US may not meet BMW LL-01 specifications.






Note: Previously I had almost given up on vacuum extraction ... after my first fiasco with the Motive Power Extractor); but now, even though I can no longer recommend the Motive, I can recommend vacuum extraction overall.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	tools.jpg
Views:	24008
Size:	100.4 KB
ID:	189358   Click image for larger version

Name:	4.jpg
Views:	18476
Size:	260.8 KB
ID:	189413   Click image for larger version

Name:	viscosity_chart.jpg
Views:	202
Size:	59.7 KB
ID:	191047  
Attached Files
File Type: pdf BMWCurrentListing_of_SyntheticOils.pdf (13.0 KB, 1120 views)

Last edited by bluebee; 06-26-2009 at 07:26 AM. Reason: Edited to add information that comes in from users so this one post is most useful to others w/o having to read all the posts
Reply With Quote
Ads by Google
  #2  
Old 05-28-2009, 10:09 AM
TheStig TheStig is offline
Some say...
Location: N/A
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,515
Mein Auto: N/A
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
c) COLD START: Depending on where you live, get an appropriate SAE W rating. Bear in mind, the SAE W rating only holds true for the first five minutes no matter what climate you live in, and even then, only in cold temperatures (it's measured at [/I]0° F[I]). Since kinematic viscosity decreases logarithmically with temperature, the SAW W rating of, say "SAE 10W", tells you that the oil "acts like" a straight SAE 10 weight oil would act at 0 degrees Fahrenheit. The point is that it is NOT an SAE 10 weight oil; it just acts like one in the winter before the engine is warmed up. Otherwise the SAE W rating is nearly meaningless except for its huge effect on the viscosity spread, e.g., SAE 5W30 will carbonize more than SAE 10W30 which will carbonize more than SAE 20W30 which will carbonize more than straight SAE 30-weight oil. Here in northern California, I can get away with straight SAE 30 or SAE 40 weight oil most of the year, if I can find it, because the SAE W rating almost never literally applies (of course, the logarithmic decrease in kinematic viscosity still applies so an understanding is necessary to make that decision).
Actually, you want a oil that has a lower W weight to minimize wear at start up.

The 0/5/10 W is measured at 40 degrees C.

Why not just pick a BMW approved oil?

Last edited by TheStig; 05-28-2009 at 10:13 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-28-2009, 10:35 AM
TheStig TheStig is offline
Some say...
Location: N/A
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,515
Mein Auto: N/A
http://www.ferrarichat.com/forum/faq...=haas_articles
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-28-2009, 01:56 PM
UH60Hwkdrvr UH60Hwkdrvr is offline
Registered User
Location: Seoul, South Korea
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Posts: 56
Mein Auto: 2008 Harley FLHX
Why suction the oil out instead of letting gravity do the trick? Am I missing something?

m.a.c.
__________________

2003 Sterling Gray 540iA M Sport w/Navi
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-28-2009, 02:04 PM
Cereall Cereall is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Macomb, MI
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 233
Mein Auto: 99 540i/6 sport
Quote:
Originally Posted by UH60Hwkdrvr View Post
Why suction the oil out instead of letting gravity do the trick? Am I missing something?

m.a.c.
im with him... i never heard of sucking out the oil except on transmission flushes and to get out all the fluid that is stuck in the auto trans of various cars

seems like gravity will get more oil out since you can let it run and drain for like an hour if you want


curious to know as i need to do an oil change this weekend
__________________
1999 BMW 540i 6-Speed Sport 9/98 build date Jet Black/Black
V1/Stealthone (so nice)
Royal purple Syncromax and RP rear diff fluid
E30 M3 short throw shifter
DDM Angel Eyes Headlights with CCFL rings and 4500k HID
BMWCCA #417904

Fire
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-28-2009, 02:09 PM
TheStig TheStig is offline
Some say...
Location: N/A
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,515
Mein Auto: N/A
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post


b) QUALITY:
Also, take into account the ACEA A3 B3 spec.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-28-2009, 02:16 PM
spydrz's Avatar
spydrz spydrz is offline
Sandlapper Chapter
Location: RVA
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 2,702
Mein Auto: 2013 X1 xDrive35i
Quote:
Originally Posted by UH60Hwkdrvr View Post
Why suction the oil out instead of letting gravity do the trick? Am I missing something?

m.a.c.
Don't have to get under the car.
__________________
1984 318i/man./Tornadorot*
1990 525i/man./Alpinweiß*
2001 525i/man./SP/PP/Cosmosschwarz/Sandbeige*
2002 X5 3.0i/man./SP/PP/Sirius/BT/Titansilber/Sandbeige*
2006 330i/man./SP/PP/CWP/Sirius/Blackline/Rear Fogs/Arktis/Grau*
2001 525i/step./SP/PP/CP/CWP/Xenons/Rear Shade/OEM Sirius/OEM BT/OEM AUX/M5 Rear Sway/Bilstein HDs/Beisan Vanos/Rear Fogs/Schiefergrün/Sandbeige*
2012 VW Golf R/Rising Blue*
2013 X1 xDrive35i Alpinweiß/Schwarz/M Sport/Premium/Tech
*retired
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-28-2009, 02:17 PM
Fudman's Avatar
Fudman Fudman is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Sudbury, MA
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Posts: 6,158
Mein Auto: '02 530i Sport auto
Quote:
Originally Posted by UH60Hwkdrvr View Post
Why suction the oil out instead of letting gravity do the trick? Am I missing something?

m.a.c.

Because it is easier and you stay much cleaner. Anyone who has suctioned their oil rarely goes back to the gravity method. You never have to crawl underneath, align your oil catch pan nor spill any oil. If only every car had a top mount filter, like BMW, I would never have to crawl underneath another car again! There has been some discussion on whether the suction method actually draills all the oil. I suspect that there is always some residual oil left within the system (e.g. oil lines, oil pump, cylinder head, etc.). The small amount remaining in the pan is probably negligible. Other than that, there is no reason why not to suction.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-28-2009, 02:32 PM
RRsE39's Avatar
RRsE39 RRsE39 is offline
-------------------------
Location: Houston
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 1,643
Mein Auto: 2001 530iA Sport
I have the mityvac 7400 and it works great.

I never used one of these before but read alot of people w/ BMW use it so I thought why not.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-28-2009, 02:35 PM
MMME30W's Avatar
MMME30W MMME30W is online now
Super Moderator
Location: On The Move
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 14,064
Mein Auto: 2009 W906
Quote:
Originally Posted by UH60Hwkdrvr View Post
Why suction the oil out instead of letting gravity do the trick? Am I missing something?

m.a.c.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cereall View Post
im with him... i never heard of sucking out the oil except on transmission flushes and to get out all the fluid that is stuck in the auto trans of various cars

seems like gravity will get more oil out since you can let it run and drain for like an hour if you want


curious to know as i need to do an oil change this weekend
Because you do get more oil out with a Mityvac - here's proof.

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...highlight=suck
__________________
“Character is doing the right thing when nobody’s looking. There are too many people who think that the only thing that’s right is to get by,and the only thing that’s wrong is to get caught.”

- J.C. Watts Jr.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-28-2009, 02:37 PM
edjack edjack is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: San Jose, CA
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 8,865
Mein Auto: '97 540i 6 speed
There's probably a pint left in the pan, since the dipstick tube does not reach to the bottom. Take a look at the extractor at Griot's Garage. Big capacity.

They use this method in Europe, since the weather is usually miserable, and who wants to get under a car that is dripping salty runoff?

I'm old-fashioned: I cannot stand to leave that much oil in the pan.

BTW, BMW used to specify 20W50 for the California climate, and that's what I use year-round. I have no lifter nor chain issues, at 112k, and the engine sounds like an electric motor. Many European car junkies run this weight in their Bimmers, too, according to an expat living in Belgium, in spite of their climate.
__________________


Ed in San Jose '97 540i 6 speed aspensilber over aubergine leather. Build date 3/97. Golden Gate Chapter BMW CCA Nr 62319.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-28-2009, 02:37 PM
kingdunke's Avatar
kingdunke kingdunke is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: los angeles
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 750
Mein Auto: 02 530iA Sport Jan/02 mfg
nice writeup! and yeah, mityvac 7400 works great for me too.

one note, you don't have to wait for 30 minutes after your first pumps. just use your best judgement and keep pumping while the oil is being sucked out. the dirty oil should be out within 15 minutes.

it doesn't work on every car tho, only the ones with dipstick going to the bottom of the pan, so you can drain the oil out completely. e.g. you can only suck out half of the dirty oil on some toyota/lexus
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 05-28-2009, 02:42 PM
540 M-Sport's Avatar
540 M-Sport 540 M-Sport is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Seattle, WA
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 4,913
Mein Auto: 01' 540 M-Sport cdn, F355
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fudman View Post
Because it is easier and you stay much cleaner. Anyone who has suctioned their oil rarely goes back to the gravity method. You never have to crawl underneath, align your oil catch pan nor spill any oil. If only every car had a top mount filter, like BMW, I would never have to crawl underneath another car again! There has been some discussion on whether the suction method actually draills all the oil. I suspect that there is always some residual oil left within the system (e.g. oil lines, oil pump, cylinder head, etc.). The small amount remaining in the pan is probably negligible. Other than that, there is no reason why not to suction.
+1, it probably is negligible...but I have had a couple very respected master technicians comment that no manufacturer recommends them...and though it leaves only a small amount of oil in the pan, unfortunately it is the part with all the unsuspended particles and most sediment is in...the exact stuff you would really like out of there.

In the grand scheme of things, it probably means little in longterm wear, but these technicians said, "use the drain bolt, the engine maker put it there for a reason, and they know a lot more about building and maintaining engines than we do". (yeah, the same engineers that removed the dip stick from the new BMW motors?)

I'm just in too much of a hurry...30 minutes for that thing to extract? Too long, I remove the bolt, take a 10 minute break to drink a Diet Coke, and swap the oil filter, and I plug it back up and fill her up!

To each there own, I am certainly not opposed to using the extractor. Just not for me.
__________________
Factory M-Sport package with factory installed M-tech bumpers, factory Bluetooth, factory M-Audio 10" dual voice coil subs, Homelink, M5 rear stabilizer bar, Bilstein B14 PSS coil overs, Stop Tech ss brake lines, Akebono Euro Ceramic brake pads, oem Brembo and Zimmerman rotors, Dinan Stage 1 software, Strong Strut front upper stress bar.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 05-28-2009, 03:04 PM
riro424 riro424 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Chicagoland
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 185
Mein Auto: 2003 525i
bluebee,

I'm a Mityvac user and would suggest:
  1. Remove the filter filter first (use a shop towel around the housing to catch drips)
  2. Extract oil
  3. Stick the hose into the filter housing to extract the couple ounces of oil that sits in the crevices
  4. Replace the o-ring (included with Mann filters) on the filter housing cap

Mann filters also come with copper washers (I've been collecting them since I've never removed the drain plug).

Instead of transferring oil to gallon jugs (you'll need two and could make a mess), find a place where you can dispose used oil from the Mityvac into collection tanks.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 05-28-2009, 03:37 PM
edjack edjack is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: San Jose, CA
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 8,865
Mein Auto: '97 540i 6 speed
Oil and filter pickup is part of my refuse collection contract. They provide the jugs and the zip-lock bags for filters!
__________________


Ed in San Jose '97 540i 6 speed aspensilber over aubergine leather. Build date 3/97. Golden Gate Chapter BMW CCA Nr 62319.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 05-28-2009, 04:42 PM
KeithS KeithS is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Central NJ
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 1,602
Mein Auto: '11 335d, '00 540iT
Important point to note:
This was mentioned but not emphasized by riro; It is important to do the FILTER FIRST! Reason is, once you break the seal on the filter housing, you are dumping from 1-2 pints of old oil back into the oil pan. This was the oil contained in the filter housing. If you had already put the drain plug back in or were finished with your mighty vac, you just left nearly a quart of dirty oil in the engine.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 05-28-2009, 04:48 PM
seitz729 seitz729 is offline
Registered User
Location: Mission Viejo, CA
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 30
Mein Auto: E34 BMW
Another Mitivac tip that I found helpful:

You can use an empty liter or quart container filled with water to mark the Liter or Quart intervals on the see through Mitivac canister using a sharpie marker. This gives you an exact extraction amount on any oil change.

For my bimmers, I alternate oil change methods for piece of mind. However, I really feel by the amount of oil needed to fill the car not varying shows that the extraction method removes the exact same amount.

Most modern Mercedes' by contrast are strictly done by the extraction method by dealers and DIYer's alike due to the difficulty accessing the oil pan drain bolt. My Benz had 16 bolts securing the plastic protective pan underneath the engine.
__________________
'92 525i
'00 528i
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 05-28-2009, 04:58 PM
chivas's Avatar
chivas chivas is offline
You Lick It, You Own It
Location: Under The Bridge
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 14,424
Send a message via ICQ to chivas Send a message via AIM to chivas
Mein Auto: 98 540i/6
vacuum does actually reach the bottom of the oil pan so i'm not sure why people think Mityvac doesn't get it all out.

DaveZ actually tested to see how much the Mityvac gets out the motor and his findings was it was just a few drops...
__________________
americandan.com

It takes a lot of work to be lazy.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 05-28-2009, 05:13 PM
clay 38 clay 38 is offline
Registered User
Location: charles city virginia
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 21
Mein Auto: 2001 540i sport 6 speed
we use the pumps at work to pull oil samples on large diesels. they tell us after sample to still pull drain plugs. because all the metals from bearings and so on settles at the bottom of the pan.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 05-28-2009, 05:22 PM
mosearch mosearch is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Point Richmond, CA
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 278
Mein Auto: 528i, Y2K
Quote:
Originally Posted by chivas View Post
vacuum does actually reach the bottom of the oil pan so i'm not sure why people think Mityvac doesn't get it all out.
...
because they haven't actually tested it and compared it to a gravity only job...

I think the mityvac is great...no home-workshop is complete without one. You can still open the drain if you like, but you will definitely remove more dirty oil (or ATF, or whatever) with a vac than without it.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 05-28-2009, 05:26 PM
chivas's Avatar
chivas chivas is offline
You Lick It, You Own It
Location: Under The Bridge
 
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 14,424
Send a message via ICQ to chivas Send a message via AIM to chivas
Mein Auto: 98 540i/6
i can't imagine changing my oil any other way. i'm actually thinking about getting an oil filter relocator for the gf's VW so i don't have to go under every again.
__________________
americandan.com

It takes a lot of work to be lazy.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 05-28-2009, 05:31 PM
clay 38 clay 38 is offline
Registered User
Location: charles city virginia
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 21
Mein Auto: 2001 540i sport 6 speed
they say because all the metal settles on your magnetized drain plug. the bigger pieces
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 05-28-2009, 05:31 PM
mosearch mosearch is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Point Richmond, CA
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 278
Mein Auto: 528i, Y2K
Quote:
Originally Posted by chivas View Post
i can't imagine changing my oil any other way. i'm actually thinking about getting an oil filter relocator for the gf's VW so i don't have to go under every again.
you mean under the car, right?

Last edited by mosearch; 05-28-2009 at 06:36 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 05-28-2009, 05:32 PM
clay 38 clay 38 is offline
Registered User
Location: charles city virginia
 
Join Date: May 2009
Posts: 21
Mein Auto: 2001 540i sport 6 speed
yeah at the bottom of the pan
Reply With Quote
  #25  
Old 05-28-2009, 05:34 PM
TheStig TheStig is offline
Some say...
Location: N/A
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1,515
Mein Auto: N/A
Quote:
Originally Posted by mosearch View Post
you mean under the car, right?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Forum Navigation
Go Back   Bimmerfest - BMW Forums > BMW Model Discussions > 5 Series > E39 (1997 - 2003)
Today's Posts Search
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:41 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
© 2001-2011 performanceIX, Inc. All Rights Reserved .: guidelines .:. privacy .:. terms