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  #1  
Old 09-13-2016, 07:47 PM
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Truth behind what caused Paul Walker's fatal crash

I've always been an advocate of the saying "....the only thing between you and the pavement, is your tires...." It's also why I've never taken short cuts when it comes to this critical area. Ever.

The write makes a very valid point on an angle that nobody's ever raised. I'm not saying he's dead-on accurate with his call - as I believe it was a number of factors aligning at just the right [unfortunate] time to contribute to such a tragedy, as opposed to just one - but it's a curve ball I never saw coming.

Read the entire article when you have time.


http://www.thedrive.com/opinion/5189...rs-fatal-crash
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  #2  
Old 09-13-2016, 09:20 PM
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sounds reasonable - dried out rubber is not the same as new grippy stuff - and it brings me back to a couple of crashes we recovered years ago - a local multi-millionaire had a collection of car which his in-house mechanic + apprentice son would test-drive regularly - the son put an Aston Martin DB4 through a hedge + rolled it. Aston Martin sent a tautliner trailer to pick up the car from our yard after we dragged it out.. the guy that worked for AM told me the car was worth more than a million pounds at the time - this was 35 years ago or thereabouts. I remember those tires - they were *dry* - but the car was a near race-car, it should have sailed round that corner.

Same fews corners about a decade later and an early Lotus Esprit went through the hedge + a stone gate pillar - a garage queen Lotus should have been *more* than capable of taking those corners at high 90's or low triple-digit speeds, because I could take them in my mini at 80-85 mph - yep, a Mini!!! I'm also thinking this was a low mileage car with original factory rubber...
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  #3  
Old 09-13-2016, 09:45 PM
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This is very very true.. Tires are very very important. I bought a brand new scooter in Taiwan and it came with brand new tires. On a day that had just rained I was coming around a turn at about 50km/h and the scooter just slipped and slid. I hit the pavement at about 50km/h. The scooter was about 2 weeks old. What was shocking to me was why why the scooter slipped and slid when it shouldn't have. The fall was quite painful. I got up and was puzzled as there was no oil on the ground and no reason for the scooter to slip and slide. I stood up and held the brakes on the scooter till they locked and then pushed the scooter. The scooter with the brakes locked would slide in the position I pushed the scooter. I knew right there and there it was the freakin stock Nankang tires that came on the damn scooter. I went to the scooter shop and replaced the tires with the best Bridgestone tires they had (made in Japan). After replacing the tires and applying the brakes I could not push the scooter on a rainy pavement in any direction no matter how much force I applied. I took the stock tire and new tire and held them by hand on the wet pavement to see which one would slide when pushed against the pavement. The difference was day and night. The cheap stock Nankang tire would slip and slide but the Japanese Bridgestone one would not move a Centimeter. Tires are the difference between life and death. When I buy tires I buy the best I can get. Cost is never a question when buying tires. Even a 2 feet mean life or death with tires. Sliding and not sliding is the difference of life or death. Stopping in 110 feet vs 115-130 feet is the difference of life or death. Those few feet could be the difference of not hitting a pole,tree or wall. Anyone of those will kill you if you hit them in a car or motorcycle.

May they rest in peace
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  #4  
Old 09-13-2016, 11:26 PM
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Good article. I read somewhere at the time a reference to the tires being too old. As I was clicking on the link I had a thought that I was going to post and then saw that he said it well early on:

Quote:
With collector cars, especially cars driven less than a few thousand miles a year, the problem is that while your tread may look good, the rubber is old and dry, and simply will not work properly. The chemical compounds in your tires will degrade over time, significantly reducing your available grip, or worse, blowing out a sidewall under load.

With sport tires, colder weather and harsh weather will exacerbate this. In general, five years from date of manufacture (stamped on the tire) is about as old as you ever want to go in a car you plan to drive quickly. If that car (or the tires themselves) are stored in a climate-controlled facility under perfect conditions, maybe you could squeeze an extra year or two out of them. But the fact is, if you have a few cars, some maybe that you only drive a few times a year, replacing tires can easily become a dangerous afterthought.
I'm sure the tires for these cars are pretty expensive, I'm not going to look for the figures, and even though these guys arguably could afford to replace them, I could understand the thinking, how the tires look so good and new, you don't drive it that often, why not just coast with these for a while.

Clearly not wise. OTOH, don't want to get into blasphemy here in the company of fast car buffs, but I am less and less impressed with uber fastness for the adrenaline rush. A little bit is nice, but there's no end to it. I mean who needs to do 0 to 60 in four seconds or less in the city? So I see a lot of factors at play. It's pretty wild though the way four high tech balloons are at the center of the whole process.
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Old 09-14-2016, 03:32 AM
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As a boater who trailers boats quite a lot, you get into the habit of tracking tires by age and not by miles or tread wear. Age, sun, dryrot are all tire killers...

I swap out tires on all my cars after 5 years...whether the miles or tread wear shows it.

Get into the habit of knowing and checking the date code on tires.

I replaced tires last year on my Porsche with only 6,000 miles, but they were 2011 tires. (It's a weekend car)...the "new" tires that the dealer sold me has a date code of the 20th week of 2013 which meant the tires had been sitting in a warehouse or somewhere for two years.

I rejected the tires and insisted they order new tires, which they did an were only 4 months old...

Where the rubber meets the road...
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Old 09-14-2016, 04:50 AM
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Great article. I totally agree.

Having the right tires on a car is like having the right type of shoes on for the specific event. i.e. You don't wear cleats to run a marathon.
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Old 09-14-2016, 05:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MRCW View Post
As a boater who trailers boats quite a lot, you get into the habit of tracking tires by age and not by miles or tread wear. Age, sun, dryrot are all tire killers...

I swap out tires on all my cars after 5 years...whether the miles or tread wear shows it.

Get into the habit of knowing and checking the date code on tires.

I replaced tires last year on my Porsche with only 6,000 miles, but they were 2011 tires. (It's a weekend car)...the "new" tires that the dealer sold me has a date code of the 20th week of 2013 which meant the tires had been sitting in a warehouse or somewhere for two years.

I rejected the tires and insisted they order new tires, which they did an were only 4 months old...

Where the rubber meets the road...

A lot of people don't check the codes for the tires when they purchase their tires. If I am paying $600-800 for two tires on my Porsche I certainly would not want 1-2 year old stock from the warehouse.
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  #8  
Old 09-14-2016, 05:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MRCW View Post
Get into the habit of knowing and checking the date code on tires.
Where can this code be found on the tire and where would I go to find the manufacturing date using this code?
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  #9  
Old 09-14-2016, 06:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maranatha View Post
Where can this code be found on the tire and where would I go to find the manufacturing date using this code?
This shows your where it is and how it is easily decoded:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete....jsp?techid=11
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  #10  
Old 09-14-2016, 06:25 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stylinexpat View Post
A lot of people don't check the codes for the tires when they purchase their tires. If I am paying $600-800 for two tires on my Porsche I certainly would not want 1-2 year old stock from the warehouse.
Correct.

Some responsibility must lie with the retailer who sold the tires too as an "aged" tire should not be sitting on the shelf waiting for a sale. Responsibility lies primarily with the consumer to investigate prior to purchasing.
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Old 09-14-2016, 06:26 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stylinexpat View Post
A lot of people don't check the codes for the tires when they purchase their tires. If I am paying $600-800 for two tires on my Porsche I certainly would not want 1-2 year old stock from the warehouse.
Every now and then we can agree...just not on Poly Sci ...!
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Old 09-14-2016, 06:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wyb View Post
This shows your where it is and how it is easily decoded:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete....jsp?techid=11
It's not always found stamped on the outer wall.

It's sometimes stamped inner wall or surface of the tire. This is why as a consumer you need to be alert and diligent when making tire purchases.

If you can't see or identify the DOM stamped on the outer wall of the tire, ask to see it prior to install.
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Old 09-14-2016, 06:31 AM
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A good detailed explanation, and video, by Edmunds as to what all those letters and numbers mean.


http://www.edmunds.com/how-to/how-to...your-tire.html
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Old 09-14-2016, 06:36 AM
Maranatha Maranatha is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wyb View Post
This shows your where it is and how it is easily decoded:

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tirete....jsp?techid=11
That's quite simple. I need to start doing this. Thanks
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Old 09-14-2016, 06:47 AM
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Truth behind what caused Paul Walker's fatal crash

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Originally Posted by MRCW View Post
Every now and then we can agree...just not on Poly Sci ...!

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Old 09-14-2016, 10:04 AM
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If you have this set then you wouldn't have to worry about the quality of the tire

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Old 09-14-2016, 02:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Maranatha View Post
That's quite simple. I need to start doing this. Thanks
I've often seen an oval with just those four numbers, and no letters. Good to know the format shown at that link. There are a limited number of numeral combinations that would fit the week-year format so that can be spotted.

Last edited by cmac2012; 09-14-2016 at 06:57 PM.
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  #18  
Old 09-14-2016, 03:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Grubrunner View Post
It's not always found stamped on the outer wall.

It's sometimes stamped inner wall or surface of the tire. This is why as a consumer you need to be alert and diligent when making tire purchases.

If you can't see or identify the DOM stamped on the outer wall of the tire, ask to see it prior to install.
it's stamped on ONE wall - if you don't have 'handed' tires, then it could be inner or outer. If you have 'handed' tires, it should be the outer wall.

Quote:
While the entire Tire Identification Number is required to be branded onto one sidewall of every tire, current regulations also require that DOT and the first digits of the Tire Identification Number must also be branded onto the opposite sidewall. Therefore, it is possible to see a Tire Identification Number that appears incomplete and requires looking at the tire's other sidewall to find the entire Tire Identification Number
So - if you see the short version, look on the OTHER SIDE for the full version with the date-code... simple enough I reckon.
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Old 09-17-2016, 05:36 PM
F32Fleet F32Fleet is offline
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Tires have a 5yr shelf life. I learned this 20 yrs ago from a tire plant manager.
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Old 09-18-2016, 05:23 PM
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A number of years ago I picked up a '95 Ducati 916 with only 800 miles on the clock.
First thing I did was replace the tires, the oem rubber still had the nubs showing. (donated the tires to one of the stunt riding groups, they don't care about grip any way)
Old rubber on any performance machine is asking for it.
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  #21  
Old 09-18-2016, 08:57 PM
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Originally Posted by F32Fleet View Post
Tires have a 5yr shelf life. I learned this 20 yrs ago from a tire plant manager.
Sounds about right.

A family member who's been a business owner in this field for almost 30YRS lives by the 6YR rule when it comes to tires..... regardless of condition.

I'm not sure if they're [unused shelf tires] useless or considered unsafe beyond that period but surely integrity has been compromised to some degree.

In saying that however, all things equal, I would rather ride on 5YR old tires sitting on a shelf than 5YR old tires wrapped around a wheel, exposed to all the exterior elements.

Anyway.....

General Motors, Chrysler and most recently Toyota all have written guidelines in their respective Owner's Manual bringing caution to tires beyond six years of age from DOM.

Goodyear, Continental, Michelin and Bridgestone all recommend having a qualified individual inspect tire's integrity beyond 6YRS from DOM regardless of appearance/condition. At 10YRS from DOM, regardless of the condition, all manufacturers [strongly] recommend replacement.

Yokohama recommends tires be inspected after 5YRS from DOM, regardless of condition and scrapped after 8YRS from DOM.
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