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E46 (1999 - 2006)
The fourth generation 3 Series (E46 chassis) was introduced in 1999 and set the standard for engineering and performance during it's years of production including being named to Car & Driver's 10 best list every one of those years! ! -- View the E46 Wiki

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  #26  
Old 01-29-2010, 11:26 PM
genuity genuity is offline
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@Starless, thanks very much for this...I have found this to be the most comprehensive. I need to do this soon. Would it be better to follow this flush procedure first before replacing the hoses? Also, how fast does the fluid level go down? I might have to do this as a one man job and wondered if it was possible.

Thanks again.
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  #27  
Old 01-30-2010, 12:15 AM
Starless Starless is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genuity View Post
@Starless, thanks very much for this...I have found this to be the most comprehensive. I need to do this soon. Would it be better to follow this flush procedure first before replacing the hoses? Also, how fast does the fluid level go down? I might have to do this as a one man job and wondered if it was possible.

Thanks again.
If you want/need to replace hoses, then definitely do the flush after since by doing this you will also bleed the system and there will be virtually no air pockets to worry about. If you want to do just the flush, the set up is going to be exactly the same. Just disconnect the lines from the reservoir.

The fluid goes down pretty fast. To give you an idea, that big funnel that I used will be almost empty in about 5 seconds after you start the engine. It will take about 10-15 seconds to go through that gallon of ATF that you will be adding into the funnel. That's why i did not use the reservoir for this purpose - it would empty out in one second and there is no way you would be able to add atf without letting the pump run dry.

You do need a helper to start and shut down the engine. It will take a coulpe of minutes of their time. Grab a relative, friend, neighbour or a passing by stranger. It's possible to do it by yourself but I'd not recommend it because the pump will run dry which is not a big deal for a couple of seconds, but then the system will be full of air and you'll have a hell of a time to bleed it. If you must do it by yourself, then I'd probable use the reservoir instead of the funnel and just dump atf into it to keep the flow. That would be tricky. Try to find somebody for 5 minutes!

Good luck!
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  #28  
Old 01-30-2010, 06:04 AM
genuity genuity is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Starless View Post
If you want/need to replace hoses, then definitely do the flush after since by doing this you will also bleed the system and there will be virtually no air pockets to worry about. If you want to do just the flush, the set up is going to be exactly the same. Just disconnect the lines from the reservoir.
Thanks for the tips! I have to replace one hose I know of but I went ahead and bought all of them as a preventative. What if I also have a leaky power steering pump? Should I replace this along with the hoses?

Why I asked before was because I know there will be sediment and contaminants already in the system and if I replaced the pump then flushed it, some of it might get lodged inside the pump? Is this even a concern or is there is not much of a chance of some stuff collecting in the pump that would not already be there if it had been flushed first then replaced and flushed again? I know that it is not possible to remove all the fluid from the system and there will always be a residual so you are bound to still have some sediment and contaminants (except if the steering rack was replaced too along with everything else, but I am not shelling out money for that at this time since it is not needed as far as I can tell).

Thanks again
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  #29  
Old 01-30-2010, 09:04 PM
Starless Starless is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genuity View Post
Thanks for the tips! I have to replace one hose I know of but I went ahead and bought all of them as a preventative. What if I also have a leaky power steering pump? Should I replace this along with the hoses?

Why I asked before was because I know there will be sediment and contaminants already in the system and if I replaced the pump then flushed it, some of it might get lodged inside the pump? Is this even a concern or is there is not much of a chance of some stuff collecting in the pump that would not already be there if it had been flushed first then replaced and flushed again? I know that it is not possible to remove all the fluid from the system and there will always be a residual so you are bound to still have some sediment and contaminants (except if the steering rack was replaced too along with everything else, but I am not shelling out money for that at this time since it is not needed as far as I can tell).

Thanks again
I'm not 100% sure, but I personally would not be too concerned with the possibility of the replacement PS pump getting clogged with sediment and contaminants during the flush. Not like it's an auto tranny with it's intricate fluid passages. And even with the auto tranny it's not a proven fact that the flush process dislodges particles that clog up the passages. Just my 2 cents
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  #30  
Old 02-09-2010, 03:27 AM
Abuja_325i Abuja_325i is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by smolck View Post
Wow, this is one of the best DIY's I have seen. We should all take notes, THIS is how to do a DIY!
Absolutely Agree 10000% Fantastic Tutorial..... Faboulus. So easy to follow and the way starless embeded the intructions & Procedures right in the Photos...Genius.

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  #31  
Old 02-14-2010, 06:46 PM
irrogical irrogical is offline
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bleeding air from the system?

is there a post dealing with bleeding the air from the power steering system?

i swapped out the hoses and reservoir today, and there seems to be quite a bit of air in the system. i ran about 3 1/2 quarts through the funnel into the pump, but the output into the bucket was still foamy. (great tip about using the hose ends from the funnel to attach the return line to the bucket drain.) when i ran the car it made a strange groaning noise when driving around the driveway.

how do i get rid of the air? i searched for 'power steering bleed air', but didnt find a thread on bleeding the air

thanks,
--roger


(took 4 hours, including a visit from mom, 2 phone calls, and refilling the humidifier.)
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  #32  
Old 02-15-2010, 09:24 AM
irrogical irrogical is offline
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answering my own question...

reply 5 has the process

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...steering+bleed

--roger
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  #33  
Old 02-15-2010, 04:32 PM
Starless Starless is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by irrogical View Post
is there a post dealing with bleeding the air from the power steering system?

i swapped out the hoses and reservoir today, and there seems to be quite a bit of air in the system. i ran about 3 1/2 quarts through the funnel into the pump, but the output into the bucket was still foamy. (great tip about using the hose ends from the funnel to attach the return line to the bucket drain.) when i ran the car it made a strange groaning noise when driving around the driveway.

how do i get rid of the air? i searched for 'power steering bleed air', but didnt find a thread on bleeding the air

thanks,
--roger


(took 4 hours, including a visit from mom, 2 phone calls, and refilling the humidifier.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by irrogical View Post
answering my own question...

reply 5 has the process

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...steering+bleed

--roger
I'm glad you figured it out. I know it's a late responce but, yeah, bleeding the system is easy:

1. With the reservoir cap open you need to turn the steering wheel from lock to lock several times. It is much better to do this with the front wheels in the air not to put too much strain on the pump. Do not hold it in the full lock position for more then a coulple of seconds, again not to put too much pressure on the pump.

2. Then you check the fluid level in the reservoir and add if needed.

3. Then repeat the process.

4. When the fluid in the reservoir does not drop any more after turning the steering wheel from lock to lock and there are no air bubbles in the fluid, you are done and have successfully bled the Ps system.

However if you followed my DIY flush you should not have a lot of air in the system at all.
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  #34  
Old 03-14-2010, 11:09 AM
cowboyjunkie cowboyjunkie is offline
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P/S line removal tool Indianapolis

Does anybody who lives in the Indianapolis area have this tool I can borrow. I purchased about two weeks ago and s&j tools has been out of stock. Im on vacation this week and really want to knock this job out. There is a dinner for two at Maggianos in it for anyone who can help me out!
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  #35  
Old 03-27-2010, 10:29 AM
genuity genuity is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Starless View Post
Does anyone know which way the fluid flows in the power steering pump pictured here? Does it flow from the hose with the clamp (arrow pointing to it) through the pump and out to the metal line or is it the other way around?

Thanks
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  #36  
Old 03-27-2010, 10:40 AM
crazyguy crazyguy is offline
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very good write up...i had just flushed the ps system on both of my bimmers a month ago
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  #37  
Old 03-27-2010, 01:18 PM
Starless Starless is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genuity View Post
Does anyone know which way the fluid flows in the power steering pump pictured here? Does it flow from the hose with the clamp (arrow pointing to it) through the pump and out to the metal line or is it the other way around?

Thanks
Genuity, yes, the ps fluid (ATF) flows into the pump (from the reservoir) thru the black hose with the clamp (low pressure line, marked with arrows on the pic) and exits thru the other hose (high pressure line - the only one I have not changed)

Hope this helps!

Last edited by Starless; 03-27-2010 at 01:22 PM.
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  #38  
Old 03-27-2010, 07:42 PM
genuity genuity is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Starless View Post
Genuity, yes, the ps fluid (ATF) flows into the pump (from the reservoir) thru the black hose with the clamp (low pressure line, marked with arrows on the pic) and exits thru the other hose (high pressure line - the only one I have not changed)

Hope this helps!
Yes thanks, I actually went ahead and proceeded with mine but I modified (added) to the equipment being used in your list. I figured out the direction of flow after I posted and went out there and just thought about things...seeing how that big hose with the clamp would not be able to take the pressure. So I did not see your post until now even though I am subscribed to this thread.

I'll post pics to piggy back onto yours if you want to see. Since my car is in pieces (entire intake manifold removed and everything under and above it, cooling system removed (yes, all cooling pipes and hoses but not the heater core of course), there is no way for me to power up (battery is also disconnected for obvious reasons) the engine to utilize the P/S pump. So I eliminated it from the equation and replaced it with a drill pump (it has an inlet and outlet the size of a garden hose attachment and also a drill bit in the middle that is probably attached to a fan-like structure within the housing...stick that onto a drill and go to town with it) so I could control the flow (however, by using this with the starting and stopping to refill the funnel, I believe air was introduced in the system and also had problems getting it to flow initially and I saw a boat load of bubbles coming out of my drill pump) but once I got a continuous flow of ATF into the drill pump, it was all good. I had a family member turn the wheel from lock to lock slowly as I pulled the trigger on the drill to have the fluid flow. I dumped a gallon of ATF through the system still with the old hoses on. Lastly to note, the drill pump...not sure if it was because it was from Harbor Freight Made in China thing, but some ATF came out of the drill bit part into the chuck and flung around as I was pumping (put a towel over it to solve that problem but also put one under it to prevent it from getting onto the engine frame or in my case the top of the headlights). I know the drill pump and any other pump where one could find for this type of application has a warning not to use it to pump caustic or flammable fluids, but hell I needed to find a solution. The original intended application of this drill pump which one could also find at those home improvement stores but for a higher cost, is to pump water. I am thinking since the ATF is thicker, it made its way past the seal in the drill pump and pushed its way out through sheer pressure (sort of like your VCG and/or rear main blowing because the CCV is clogged).

Next, I'll be removing all the hoses to prepare for me to drop the subframe, lower the rack, and to change out that oil pan gasket. I figured it would be one less dangling thing. I'll just stuff the rack openings and the long coil openings for the power steering cooler line that runs in front of the A/C condenser up to prevent fluid from junking up my clean engine bay. I pressure washed it about three times and also painstakingly cleaned nearly ever waffle hole on the side of the engine there to clean up a leaky oil filter housing gasket. If this engine leaks again, I want to know where it is coming from instead of cleaning and guessing (I know I had that leaking, plus a power steering line was leaking...the one that attaches to the P/S pump, and the P/S pump was a suspect in a leak too, CCV was on it's way out but previous owner also had a valve cover gasket leak but never cleaned it up)

After all is said and done, if I still have an oil leak, it will be without a doubt the rear main seal. It's hard to tell now whether it is 100% that or just the back of the oil pan. I have had the oil drained for the past couple of months, but yet I still see a drop or two on one of those longest bolts on the bottom most of the bell housing. I also see oil seepage where the oil pan gasket is on the passenger side and it originates from the back somewhere there. Before I took her offline, I noticed some oil seepage from the front corner where the oil pan meets the block, so I figured I'll go and change this out to eliminate it as a source of leak.
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  #39  
Old 03-27-2010, 07:57 PM
Starless Starless is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by genuity View Post
Yes thanks, I actually went ahead and proceeded with mine but I modified (added) to the equipment being used in your list. I figured out the direction of flow after I posted and went out there and just thought about things...seeing how that big hose with the clamp would not be able to take the pressure. So I did not see your post until now even though I am subscribed to this thread.

I'll post pics to piggy back onto yours if you want to see. Since my car is in pieces (entire intake manifold removed and everything under and above it, cooling system removed (yes, all cooling pipes and hoses but not the heater core of course), there is no way for me to power up (battery is also disconnected for obvious reasons) the engine to utilize the P/S pump. So I eliminated it from the equation and replaced it with a drill pump (it has an inlet and outlet the size of a garden hose attachment and also a drill bit in the middle that is probably attached to a fan-like structure within the housing...stick that onto a drill and go to town with it) so I could control the flow (however, by using this with the starting and stopping to refill the funnel, I believe air was introduced in the system and also had problems getting it to flow initially and I saw a boat load of bubbles coming out of my drill pump) but once I got a continuous flow of ATF into the drill pump, it was all good. I had a family member turn the wheel from lock to lock slowly as I pulled the trigger on the drill to have the fluid flow. I dumped a gallon of ATF through the system still with the old hoses on. Lastly to note, the drill pump...not sure if it was because it was from Harbor Freight Made in China thing, but some ATF came out of the drill bit part into the chuck and flung around as I was pumping (put a towel over it to solve that problem but also put one under it to prevent it from getting onto the engine frame or in my case the top of the headlights). I know the drill pump and any other pump where one could find for this type of application has a warning not to use it to pump caustic or flammable fluids, but hell I needed to find a solution. The original intended application of this drill pump which one could also find at those home improvement stores but for a higher cost, is to pump water. I am thinking since the ATF is thicker, it made its way past the seal in the drill pump and pushed its way out through sheer pressure (sort of like your VCG and/or rear main blowing because the CCV is clogged).

Next, I'll be removing all the hoses to prepare for me to drop the subframe, lower the rack, and to change out that oil pan gasket. I figured it would be one less dangling thing. I'll just stuff the rack openings and the long coil openings for the power steering cooler line that runs in front of the A/C condenser up to prevent fluid from junking up my clean engine bay. I pressure washed it about three times and also painstakingly cleaned nearly ever waffle hole on the side of the engine there to clean up a leaky oil filter housing gasket. If this engine leaks again, I want to know where it is coming from instead of cleaning and guessing (I know I had that leaking, plus a power steering line was leaking...the one that attaches to the P/S pump, and the P/S pump was a suspect in a leak too, CCV was on it's way out but previous owner also had a valve cover gasket leak but never cleaned it up)

After all is said and done, if I still have an oil leak, it will be without a doubt the rear main seal. It's hard to tell now whether it is 100% that or just the back of the oil pan. I have had the oil drained for the past couple of months, but yet I still see a drop or two on one of those longest bolts on the bottom most of the bell housing. I also see oil seepage where the oil pan gasket is on the passenger side and it originates from the back somewhere there. Before I took her offline, I noticed some oil seepage from the front corner where the oil pan meets the block, so I figured I'll go and change this out to eliminate it as a source of leak.
Wow, man! Sounds like a big job you are doing there! I'd love to see some pics of that repair! I'm glad everything went well with the drill pump, although I have no clear idea what it is
Couple of months? When are you planning to finish?

Good job and post your pictures!
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  #40  
Old 03-28-2010, 07:05 PM
genuity genuity is offline
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Alright, finally had time to get organize the pics...

First pic: 0.jpg - is the clear tubing I used 5/8" x 1/2" x 10'. Note that the outer diameter of the tubing is 5/8 and the inner diameter is 1/2". This is the same as Starless' tubing. These measurements will be important for buying the fittings. I bought 5/8" fitting then had to go back to get the 1/2" ones since that is the inner diameter which goes best with everything.

Second and third pics: 1.jpg and 2.jpg is the ATF I used. I tried to find the blue container that Starless used but this was the only one available. It served it's purpose though and note from the back label it is also synthetic

Fourth pic: 3.jpg Showed the funnel I used, which is the same as the one Starless used. I got this at AutoZone. I also did not use the hose that was attached to it and that little black flippy cap that you see in this picture. I just took it off since I was going to put more tubing to that blue part of that funnel. You will also see in the next round of pic post that I will secure this funnel to a ladder, so all I will have to do is pour the fluid and make sure it does not get empty.

Fifth and sixth pic: 4.jpg and 5.jpg is the "drill pump" I bought from Harbor Freight. It was intended to pump water. The thread size on it is 3/4" and it is basically the same standard size as a garden hose. Note how it has a drill bit on it. This is where you put into the drill chuck. This is also where it leaked ATF from when I was pumping. It was not a gusher, but it again was enough to serve its purpose. I am also not sure if it leaked because ATF was thicker than water but I do know that this drill pump thing was rated up to 2500 RPMs which is the highest RPM that my drill was so it was not that I exceeded the RPMs. It could have also been because of pressure...maybe it was just too much for it. Anyone with ideas on why it leaked? Was it because it was a cheapo Harbor Freight Made in China thing? Anyhow, it did the job. The item farthest on the right is a 1/2" splicer. This will be important in the next post.
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  #41  
Old 03-28-2010, 07:35 PM
genuity genuity is offline
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6.jpg: shows the clamp I used to secure the tubing to the funnel...just in case. These are Norma brand clamps with the style name as Torro (often seen as "Norma Torro"). The premium "BMW" clamps that you see in various locations on the vehicle like around the air intake boots and fuel filter, those worm style clamps that do not bite through the hoses are really made by Norma. They just have no traces of Norma but have the BMW logo on it. I found them to be the cheapest at: http://www.clipsandfasteners.com/Nor...amps_s/671.htm

7.jpg: shows how I secured the funnel to the ladder. Don't just tie the handle...I did and then further secured it with masking tape. Ask me how I know? Well as I had that funnel full with ATF and as I was working the drill, it just moved and spilled about a cup of ATF all over my front bumper and on the floor, so make sure it will not move while on the ladder. I did not have the luxury of having a bunch of helpers. This tubing that you see connected to the funnel is connected directly to the "IN"port of the drill pump. The drill pump has two inlets as you saw earlier, one marked IN and one OUT. This is the direction of flow.

8.jpg: shows the drill pump using those brass fittings identified in the previous post. This one goes further and showed the clamp size I used. You will need to use clamps since the hoses slides off the barb fitting really easily.

9.jpg: shows the drill pump fully attached to the drill as well as all fittings. Starting on the left with that hose is the IN port. The end that you do not see pictured goes to the funnel. Fluid flows from here into the drill pump bit and out the hose on the right hand side of the picture. As I mentioned earlier, here is where it was good that I got clips on this. As I was running the drill fully at 2500 RPMs, some of the ATF fluid backed up and made its way past the clip. It looks like I did not screw the worm clamp down hard enough. Once I did, no more leaks from there. As mentioned in the previous posts, I did have a leak from the drill pump bit...between that and the chuck of the drill. Hence you see the shopping bag with newspaper and blue shop towel. It was not a gusher but it was a little drip.

10.jpg shows how I slipped the clear tubing over this threaded bolt. This hose originally attaches to the power steering pump. If you go to Starless' first post at the beginning of this thread, you will see it. The power steering pump as Starless mentioned above has a low pressure tube and high pressure tube. The high pressure tube is the one with the metal hose attached to it. The low is the rubber one. As noted in the last paragraph, you see how I had a leak on the brass fitting with the tubing going OUT of my drill pump, right? Once I clamped it down it did not leak anymore. Well this threaded end that you see in this picture has a little O-ring on it. This part goes into the power steering pump and then the threaded bolt helps hold the pipe into the pump. This threaded bolt is not your ordinary threaded bolt. It slides up and down that metal tubing. I knew there would be a leak from this...that is between the middle of the bolt where it touches the metal tubing. I only used the clamp to secure the clear tubing to the threads of the bolt, although the tubing had a really good fit to the threads, since I actually had to use plyers and the screw the threads into the tubing since I could not just push the clear tubing over the threads.
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  #42  
Old 03-28-2010, 08:07 PM
genuity genuity is offline
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a.jpg: shows the top power steering hose. This end originally goes into the power steering reservoir. It is the smaller hose and also known as the return hose since it returns power steering fluid to the reservoir. The other larger hose that comes out of the power steering reservoir, is the lower pressure hose that goes into the power steering pump. It feeds the ATF fluid into the pump via gravity and also with the power steering pump creating the vacuum. Back to the hose in my picture, in Starless' first post, he connected the clear tubing to this and then ran that tubing into a plastic canister to hold the dirty power steering fluid. I will be doing the same, since dirty fluid will be coming out of this and then eventually clean as I run about a gallon of that ATF through the system.

b.jpg: shows that brass 1/2" splicer barb as noted in 5.jpg in two posts above. I used the size 12 mm to 20 mm on this one since the hose's outside diameter plus the barb fitting makes it larger, so I could not use the same clamps as I did before, which I will show in the next picture. Getting the brass barb into this hose was a PITA. I actually ended up taking silicone and putting a little bit on the tip of the barb then using lock grip pliers on the other end of the barb and pushing and screwing the hell out of it to get it in there. As you can see in the picture, I was unsuccessful in getting the barb fully into the hose. I just measured the inner diameter of the that hose pictured in a.jpg and it is 11 mm, so about 0.43 inches which is less than the 1/2" barb so that is the problem there.

c.jpg: shows I used the 10 mm to 16 mm clamp. for the clear tubing hose that will run to my ATF catch container that will hold the dirty ATF fluid and also the fluid once it runs to the nice clean red color. For the purposes of making sure I get it all clean before I put in the new tubing and pump, I think it is worth it. When I do attach the hoses back, I will probably go ahead and buy another gallon and using the same setup will put the fluid back in before I install the pump just to pretty much prime the P/S system to help it get started since it is not good to let it run dry with only fluid in the rack and not in the hoses. The pump will definitely not like that and gravity will only do so much if I assemble all the hoses and pump and just pour ATF into the reservoir. When I was starting off doing this, I noticed that the drill pump was crap until I got a constant flow of ATF in the lines before and after the drill pump. It was only after I did that was it able to push the old fluid out of all the lines and into my catch container.

d.jpg: shows the tubing on the left with the clear tubing attached to it...this is the return line that runs to the catch container. Rather than turning that hose up to run out from the upper part of the hood and over the bumper and headlights as Starless did, I went ahead and turned it down to help it work with gravity instead of against it. I do not think Starless had the luxury of having everything in that area under the power steering reservoir removed. As you can see in this picture I have everything removed...alternator, oil filter housing, radiator, cooling hoses and pipes, and of course what you do not see is everything under and above the intake manifold. Back to the picture, do you see the long clear tubing with the bright red ATF fluid and how it runs down to near the sway bar? Well this this tubing comes out of the drill pump and into that power steering hose that is metal, pictures 10.jpg and 11.jpg in the previous post.

While I had the trigger pressed on the drill, I had a helper turn the wheel from lock to lock slowly. Since I have all those items removed from the engine, obviously the battery was disconnected and the steering wheel was locked, right? However, if you put the key into the first position (accessories), even though this BMW is all technologically advanced (I say this for all of the technologies that it has on it...like drive by wire...I never had this before), it is still mechanical in a lot of respects and the steering wheel lock is mechanical. Key in first position allowed the steering wheel to be unlocked and I was able to turn it freely. Note that I also do not have it pictured that the front end of my bimmer was on jackstands and the tires were off. This was so the steering wheel could be turned easily and without undue stress. I think this is the best way to go for the power steering flush DIY whichever method that one chooses to do. Less weight and stress on the steering rack.

So there you have it, if you are unable to power up your vehicle to do a power steering flush because you are working on other stuff like I am, here is a way to bypass the power steering pump and you are still able to flush it.
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  #43  
Old 03-28-2010, 08:39 PM
Starless Starless is offline
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Location: STL, MO
 
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Genuity, great job! I think now it's officially "the best PS flush DIY" on the internet! Thank you for the write-up and pictures of your work! The drill pump idea is very ingenious and worked great for the purpose and under your circumstances with the car being without power. I'm sure some people will try it out again. Or at least they will know that option is there. PS systems are similar on many cars so the application of this write up is very broad now. Your addition to this thread is valuable and is appreciated!

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  #44  
Old 04-10-2010, 09:32 AM
38wildwood 38wildwood is offline
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Location: wildwood mo
 
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Mein Auto: 01 325i
door spring tool works in place of $31 PS line tool

Hey all,
Starless, best DIY presentation ever posted. I was planning on using a line wrench and brute strength for removing the ps lines in place of the $31 tool.

Then I realized I had an old door spring tool that I bought at harbor freight some years back for about $6. They are available at any parts store, possibly even for a free rental. It worked awesome. Fits on the second step-up in the line diameter rather than the first, but it was cake!
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  #45  
Old 04-10-2010, 11:46 AM
Starless Starless is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 38wildwood View Post
Hey all,
Starless, best DIY presentation ever posted. I was planning on using a line wrench and brute strength for removing the ps lines in place of the $31 tool.

Then I realized I had an old door spring tool that I bought at harbor freight some years back for about $6. They are available at any parts store, possibly even for a free rental. It worked awesome. Fits on the second step-up in the line diameter rather than the first, but it was cake!
Interesting! If possible post a picture of door spring tool. I can not recall how it looks like!
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  #46  
Old 04-15-2010, 11:35 AM
Cideways Cideways is offline
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Location: Virginia
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1
Mein Auto: 2001 325i
Thumbs up

Starless, and others that contributed, I wanted to send a quick thanks. I completed this DIY over the weekend and it worked perfect. No more leaking in the driveway or garage.

I recently purchased this car and the inspection station told me it was the PS pump that was leaking. The seller agreed to have it replaced by his mechanic and pay for it. He said it was about $400 total. A few weeks later I noticed that it was still leaking and luckily found this DIY. Now I have a new pump, hoses and fluid. Currently have 117K miles so I should be good for a while.

I only had two minor issues. The first was getting the hollow bolt with the crush washers lined up and back on. I could only get one hand in there and had to hold the crush washers, manipulate the hose and thread bolt properly all at the same time. Just took a little patience.

The other issue was while trying to bleed the system, I could not get the fluid to flow through the lines. I checked everything, all the connections, made sure the funnel was open, etc. Then I realized that the funnel hose going into the line to the P/S pump was being sucked close by the pump. That new pump really sucks . Just cut the end off and refitted the connection. It then worked as described.

I can't add anything to the OP instructions - they are spot on and this was very easy because of them. Thanks again for your time in putting this together for us nubies.
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  #47  
Old 04-15-2010, 11:48 AM
Starless Starless is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cideways View Post
Starless, and others that contributed, I wanted to send a quick thanks. I completed this DIY over the weekend and it worked perfect. No more leaking in the driveway or garage.

I recently purchased this car and the inspection station told me it was the PS pump that was leaking. The seller agreed to have it replaced by his mechanic and pay for it. He said it was about $400 total. A few weeks later I noticed that it was still leaking and luckily found this DIY. Now I have a new pump, hoses and fluid. Currently have 117K miles so I should be good for a while.

I only had two minor issues. The first was getting the hollow bolt with the crush washers lined up and back on. I could only get one hand in there and had to hold the crush washers, manipulate the hose and thread bolt properly all at the same time. Just took a little patience.

The other issue was while trying to bleed the system, I could not get the fluid to flow through the lines. I checked everything, all the connections, made sure the funnel was open, etc. Then I realized that the funnel hose going into the line to the P/S pump was being sucked close by the pump. That new pump really sucks . Just cut the end off and refitted the connection. It then worked as described.

I can't add anything to the OP instructions - they are spot on and this was very easy because of them. Thanks again for your time in putting this together for us nubies.
You are welcome! Glad everything went well. You are right now your PS system is taken care of for a good while.
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  #48  
Old 07-03-2010, 06:25 PM
G. P. Burdell's Avatar
G. P. Burdell G. P. Burdell is offline
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Location: Southeastern U.S.
 
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Mein Auto: E46
Starless,

Thank you! This thread was a great resource for me as I prepared to replace my power steering pump, plus all of the lines and the reservoir. I did the work today. Rather than start a new thread, I thought I'd share some observations and tips here:
  • The special tool Starless used to release the hose couplings at the cooling coil is made and sold by Assenmacher Specialty Tools in Colorado. Its current list price is just under $35. I purchased the tool from a very nice lady at AST and received it a couple of days later. It's worth every penny! Releasing the bottom hose (the rack-to-coil hose) is a little tricky if you have AL bi-xenon headlights, because the ballast attached to the headlight housing makes access to the hose coupling a bit tight.
  • To prevent the hose connections at the steering rack from making a big mess when loosened, I tore a triangular section out of a disposable aluminum turkey tray, formed a spout with it, and jammed it underneath the rack and the two small hard lines that attach to the rack. See attached photo. The spout channeled the spilling ATF from the banjo fittings and the steering rack into my oil drain pan with minimal mess. I suppose you could make a similar spout out of heavy-duty aluminum foil, but the extra rigidity of the turkey tray helped it keep its shape and stay in place.
  • I chose not to do the flush as Starless described. Instead, to get as much of the old fluid out of the system as possible, I drained and refilled the reservoir three or four times in the two weeks leading up to today. Also, after disconnecting both banjo bolts at the rack, I turned the steering wheel from lock to lock a few times in order to force more fluid out of the rack. This was a tip I picked up from a DIY thread on either m3post.com or m3forum.com. The aforementioned spout was handy for this part of the work as well. I got around a quart of fluid out of the hoses, reservoir, and rack.
  • I replaced the car's original LUK LF-20 pump with a LUK LF-30 pump. The LF-20 has an operating pressure of 110 bar (approximately 1,600 PSI), and the LF-30 has a slightly higher operating pressure of 120 bar (approximately 1,740 PSI). This necessitated the replacement of the pressure hose from the pump to the rack. This hose has a list price of $240! I've attached a photo showing the difference in the brackets that attach each pump to the engine. Releasing the sway bar brackets from the body allowed me to shift the bar towards the rear of the car, freeing up some space and making pump removal and replacement much easier.
  • The last photo I've posted is of the black stain that was forming in the original reservoir's filter. Something in the system was breaking down - maybe it was the pump, which I replaced today because it was exhibiting some shaft play. Or maybe the hoses were starting to disintegrate. Whatever the cause, I'm glad to have replaced all of it.

Thanks again for this very informative thread!
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Last edited by G. P. Burdell; 07-03-2010 at 06:28 PM.
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  #49  
Old 07-03-2010, 09:52 PM
Starless Starless is offline
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Thank you for your notes, G.P Burdell. Good job on replacing the pump! This thread is getting more and more informative thanks to your guys contributions!
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  #50  
Old 08-25-2010, 04:43 PM
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gordo325xiwagon gordo325xiwagon is offline
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Location: Ormond Beach FL
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 385
Mein Auto: '01 325xit & '93 300zx TT
I want to change PS fluid. Your flush DIY Tech is the best method I have seen so far and an excellent write up.

However, rather than removing the reservoir, I was wondering if there was a single line disconnect that would gravity drain most of the fluid? I know that would replace less fluid than a flush; but it is a heck of lot better than using a turkey baster to suck out the old fluid. I was looking at one of the bottom banjo bolts?? What do you think?
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Last edited by gordo325xiwagon; 08-25-2010 at 06:37 PM.
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