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E90/E91/E92/E93 (2006 - 2013)
The E9X is the 4th evolution of the BMW 3 series including a highly tuned twin turbo 335i variant pushing out 300hp and 300 ft. lbs. of torque. BMW continues to show that it sets the bar for true driving performance! -- View the E9X Wiki

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  #1  
Old 12-04-2009, 08:32 AM
squato squato is offline
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torque for e90 wheel lugs

Can't find this in the manual. What is the proper torque for wheel lug nuts?
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  #2  
Old 12-04-2009, 08:59 AM
squato squato is offline
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found it somewhere else. 88-90 ft/lb
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  #3  
Old 12-04-2009, 09:01 AM
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Pedal2Floor Pedal2Floor is offline
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I could be wrong but I believe its 88 for most BMWs
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  #4  
Old 12-04-2009, 10:37 AM
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DSXMachina DSXMachina is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by squato View Post
found it somewhere else. 88-90 ft/lb
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedal2Floor View Post
I could be wrong but I believe its 88 for most BMWs
Correct for most cast BMW wheels, but not for all wheels. You need to know what the wheel mfr. requires if they are non-BMW wheels as it will vary.
(In my experience 90 ft. lb. is a good number for almost all cast wheels.)
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  #5  
Old 12-04-2009, 01:12 PM
pippo pippo is offline
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If you torque to that spec make sure you have a 4 foot lever/galvanized pipe to use to attach to your wrench bar/lever if you need to unscrew lugs. And if your a girl, hehe.........

I found that spec on most cars is overkill, but just a personal opionion although much experience with me torquing under spec with no troubles with wheels rolling off cars on the road...LOL

But, I check/do work on cars often, and yanking wheels off all the time. Do the torque-to-spec-religiously to be sure if you have any doubts.
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  #6  
Old 12-04-2009, 01:26 PM
CarlosCA CarlosCA is offline
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I am aware of the intended humor, but using a torque wrench to remove bolts/nuts is not recommended and if you have to use a piece of pipe to attach a bolt that is being torqued, you're far exceeding the torque wrench's rating.

I use some antiseize on the threads so I torque my wheel bolts to 67 ft lbs. They don't loosen up and I can easily remove them with a 15" long 1/2" drive slide bar. Actually, I can get them off with a 9" long 3/8" slide bar, but I carry the 1/2" drive just in case.
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  #7  
Old 12-04-2009, 01:53 PM
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You should never be using anti-seize on lugs. And 88 ft lbs can easily be broken with a 1/2" drive wrench or T-handle wrench. That's not nearly as tight as you might think. My wife--all 100lbs of her--can break that without issue.
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  #8  
Old 12-04-2009, 02:04 PM
CarlosCA CarlosCA is offline
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Yeah, I know about that, but I'm from the other mindset...I do use anti-seize on lugs and spark plugs plus any other areas that are specifically designated by manufacturers. I have been doing it for more than 25 years. It has worked for me, so I plan to keep doing it. You'll find two schools of thought here when it comes to the use of anti-seize.
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  #9  
Old 12-04-2009, 03:00 PM
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DSXMachina DSXMachina is offline
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Originally Posted by CarlosCA View Post
Yeah, I know about that, but I'm from the other mindset...I do use anti-seize on lugs and spark plugs plus any other areas that are specifically designated by manufacturers. I have been doing it for more than 25 years. It has worked for me, so I plan to keep doing it. You'll find two schools of thought here when it comes to the use of anti-seize.
Yep. The school acording to those who write the books. And the school according to those of us who actually see what happens in the real world.
I'm not going to go opening that old can of worms again by venturing an opinion. What I do in the privacy of my garage stays in my garage.
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  #10  
Old 12-04-2009, 03:53 PM
pippo pippo is offline
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Originally Posted by CarlosCA View Post
I am aware of the intended humor, but using a torque wrench to remove bolts/nuts is not recommended and if you have to use a piece of pipe to attach a bolt that is being torqued, you're far exceeding the torque wrench's rating.

I use some antiseize on the threads so I torque my wheel bolts to 67 ft lbs. They don't loosen up and I can easily remove them with a 15" long 1/2" drive slide bar. Actually, I can get them off with a 9" long 3/8" slide bar, but I carry the 1/2" drive just in case.
Thanks, carlos, for the reply. I think I mentioned though that the tongue in cheeck idea of carrying the 4 foot pipe was not for tightening but for loosening. Thats what I meant to say. Maybe I could have written the words better, dunno.....

Sometimes, I have a hard time undoing lugs from garages that used impact wrenches with no measurement of torque as they tighten......He Men/ Charles Atlas wannabees.

I always use a torque wrench (hand one) to tighten. Never guess.
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  #11  
Old 12-04-2009, 04:04 PM
pippo pippo is offline
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Yeah, the anti sieze thing.......If you have to/want to/need to, maybe avoid smearing it on threads. Instead, place a tiny amt only on the surface of the nut/lug that eventually comes into contact with the actual face of the wheel. Im not an engineer from GM/BMW/whatever, but I dont think they intended the torque spec WITH threads having had a coat of A. Sieze which, as anyone will guess, will increase torque, possibly snapping a stud........

Last edited by pippo; 12-04-2009 at 04:06 PM.
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  #12  
Old 12-04-2009, 04:10 PM
hansriet hansriet is offline
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Torque values are specified for untreated nuts and bolts. Applying anti seize will render any torque value meaningless.

Hans
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  #13  
Old 12-04-2009, 04:48 PM
daytrader daytrader is offline
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Originally Posted by squato View Post
Can't find this in the manual. What is the proper torque for wheel lug nuts?
130 Nm or exactly 95.88307940601 ft. lbs

Last edited by daytrader; 12-04-2009 at 04:54 PM.
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  #14  
Old 12-04-2009, 09:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pippo View Post
Yeah, the anti sieze thing.......If you have to/want to/need to, maybe avoid smearing it on threads. Instead, place a tiny amt only on the surface of the nut/lug that eventually comes into contact with the actual face of the wheel. Im not an engineer from GM/BMW/whatever, but I dont think they intended the torque spec WITH threads having had a coat of A. Sieze which, as anyone will guess, will increase torque, possibly snapping a stud........
Agreed. Except when the nut or bolt has been off and on dirty threads a couple dozen times, and has begun to get surface corrosion due to heavy use of salt in the snow belt.
(BTW, torque will NOT increase with lubrication. Torque is whatever you set it at. What will change is clamping force, a function of tension, and a result of the torque applied. For an interesting experiment conductedby our own ProfessorCook, search his name along with the keyword 'torque')

Last edited by DSXMachina; 12-04-2009 at 09:49 PM.
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  #15  
Old 12-05-2009, 04:44 AM
CarlosCA CarlosCA is offline
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Originally Posted by pippo View Post
I always use a torque wrench (hand one) to tighten. Never guess.

Agreed. I have two, a 1/2" and a 3/8" and that pretty much takes care of anything I have to torque. It's a leftover discipline from the military, where we torqued and put anti-seize on nearly everything. I never had anything fall off a jet in over 20 years despite stresses and loads no BMW will ever see.
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  #16  
Old 12-05-2009, 05:21 AM
pippo pippo is offline
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Originally Posted by CarlosCA View Post
Agreed. I have two, a 1/2" and a 3/8" and that pretty much takes care of anything I have to torque. It's a leftover discipline from the military, where we torqued and put anti-seize on nearly everything. I never had anything fall off a jet in over 20 years despite stresses and loads no BMW will ever see.
Wow, now I am impressed. Really. Its funny when you get car guys with much experience comment, it surely contributes to forums like this. But when you get an aircraft guy in the picture, to me, that carries a different kind of weight.

Everything they do is approached with such a higher degree of exactness. To them, cars could be on the lever of say, go carts.

AND its interesting you (the military?) uses anti sieze regularly. Hmmmmmmmm........that is kind of a surprise. The more you learn the more you realize how little you know.
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  #17  
Old 12-06-2009, 05:29 AM
CarlosCA CarlosCA is offline
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I am not sure if there is a hint of sarcasm there or not, so I will approach it as not.

F-16s in particular have many parts that get a little bit of anti-seize. The one I recall using the most was a molybdenum disulfide paste for pylons attached to the wings. You're talking a hunk of steel weighing probably 200 pounds that is designed to hold over 3000 pounds of stores at several Gs of force...and it gets anti-seize on the three bolts that hold it in place.

Whatever didn't get anti-seize usually got some kind of oil and the technical manuals were very specific on which type of oil went where, even if it meant three types of oil in different places on one component, and all were identified by MIL standard ID.

And as for exactness, nearly everything on military jets is torqued with manuals being very specific on torques, such as 275in/lbs +-10 in/lbs. For multiple jobs, torque wrenches were king, but there were some torque adapters that fit on the end of a simple speed handle for common jobs. They were set to one non-adjustable torque. Torque wrenches were also calibrated on a regular basis and were immediately removed from service if overdue calibration.

Do you know a mechanic that uses a torque wrench regularly? Ask him what the correct torque would be on a part that is to be tightened using a crows foot and an extension. A real-world application for something like that would be correctly tightening a hose for say a brake line or power steering pump. The crows foot and extension change the torque setting and there is actually a formula for that. Military teaches that kind of stuff.

Anyway, back to the subject at hand.
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  #18  
Old 12-06-2009, 05:37 AM
pippo pippo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CarlosCA View Post
I am not sure if there is a hint of sarcasm there or not, so I will approach it as not.

F-16s in particular have many parts that get a little bit of anti-seize. The one I recall using the most was a molybdenum disulfide paste for pylons attached to the wings. You're talking a hunk of steel weighing probably 200 pounds that is designed to hold over 3000 pounds of stores at several Gs of force...and it gets anti-seize on the three bolts that hold it in place.

Whatever didn't get anti-seize usually got some kind of oil and the technical manuals were very specific on which type of oil went where, even if it meant three types of oil in different places on one component, and all were identified by MIL standard ID.

And as for exactness, nearly everything on military jets is torqued with manuals being very specific on torques, such as 275in/lbs +-10 in/lbs. For multiple jobs, torque wrenches were king, but there were some torque adapters that fit on the end of a simple speed handle for common jobs. They were set to one non-adjustable torque. Torque wrenches were also calibrated on a regular basis and were immediately removed from service if overdue calibration.

Do you know a mechanic that uses a torque wrench regularly? Ask him what the correct torque would be on a part that is to be tightened using a crows foot and an extension. A real-world application for something like that would be correctly tightening a hose for say a brake line or power steering pump. The crows foot and extension change the torque setting and there is actually a formula for that. Military teaches that kind of stuff.

Anyway, back to the subject at hand.
No sarcasm on my post, buddy. Yeah, Thats what I said, aircraft makes cars look like go carts. I thought A Sieze main component was Nickel.....maybe a different type, this Moly, eh?

Yup, Mil Spec, ASTM, etc. Anyway, interesting, for sure.
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  #19  
Old 12-07-2009, 04:26 PM
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westwest888 westwest888 is offline
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88 ft/lb.
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  #20  
Old 12-07-2009, 04:51 PM
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vadim vadim is offline
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Originally Posted by hansriet View Post
Torque values are specified for untreated nuts and bolts. Applying anti seize will render any torque value meaningless.

Hans
+1. Tightening torque settings for wheel lugs are dry-torque settings. Applying the same torque on lubed threads will result in overtightening.
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Old 12-07-2009, 04:59 PM
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88 ft/lb.
That would be 88 ft*lb, or, to be correct, 88 lb*ft.

ft*lb = foot-pound is a unit of energy or work.
lb*ft = pound-foot is a unit of torque.
ft/lb (as well as lb/ft) is incorrect and has no physical meaning.
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