Welcome to Bimmerfest -- The #1 Online Community for BMW related information! Please enjoy the discussion forums below and share your experiences with the 200,000 current, new and past BMW owners. The forums are broken out by car model and into other special interest sections such as BMW European Delivery and a special forum to voice your questions to the many BMW dealers on the site to assist our members!

Please follow the links below to help get you started!

Go Back   Bimmerfest - BMW Forums > The Best of Bimmerfest! > BMW Diesel Owners / Enthusiasts

BMW Diesel Owners / Enthusiasts
Do you own a diesel powered BMW? Maybe a 335d or a BMW x35d? Come and talk about what makes your car great!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 04-06-2014, 01:45 PM
Flyingman's Avatar
Flyingman Flyingman is offline
hang up and drive!
Location: Miami
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,841
Mein Auto: 335d
Would you consider a Tesla?

Folks,

I was just pondering if I would consider buying a Tesla, perhaps to replace my 2010 335D in the future should I find the need.

I've seen a few, my nieghber did a test drive and really was impressed.

I thought I wouldn't like the "range" issue but realized my driving is about 95% commuting 72 miles roundtrip from home to office and back, so should have no issue recharging each evening.

I suppose no road trips in the Tesla? How would you do that?

Anyway, would like to hear others thoughts about the Tesla or any other battery operated car.
__________________

Last edited by Flyingman; 04-06-2014 at 01:46 PM.
Reply With Quote
Ads by Google
  #2  
Old 04-06-2014, 02:09 PM
FredoinSF FredoinSF is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Bay Area and Reno
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,225
Mein Auto: 650i 330cic X5d MINI
No, I drive the X5d from SF to Reno almost every week in the winter and that's 215 miles going from sea level to 7,777 feet each way.
Even the 650i and 330ci do this drive in the summer, so it would not even be a good replacement for either of those. Not to mention I drive them to Palm Springs / LA / San Diego a couple times a year. That would take all freakin day in a Tesla.
__________________



Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 04-06-2014, 04:15 PM
mattebury mattebury is offline
Registered User
Location: Southern California
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 39
Mein Auto: 328d
If I had the money, one would be in my garage right now
__________________
2014 328d
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 04-06-2014, 05:35 PM
Hoooper Hoooper is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: CA
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 241
Mein Auto: 335D
Yes, but I would either need to live closer to my office first or it would be my weekend car. I usually only drive 70 miles a day, but I sometimes get to work and have a surprise 300 mile drive that day. The Tesla wouldn't do well on 370 miles
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-06-2014, 06:24 PM
anE934fun anE934fun is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: S.F. Bay Area
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 6,716
Mein Auto: 2010 335d
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hoooper View Post
Yes, but I would either need to live closer to my office first or it would be my weekend car. I usually only drive 70 miles a day, but I sometimes get to work and have a surprise 300 mile drive that day. The Tesla wouldn't do well on 370 miles
Any EV will have the range issue. Tesla is trying to work around the range issue with swappable battery packs, but you are still out the time to do the swap, not to mention must have a service facility that can swap the battery. My net take-away from researching the Tesla is that for it to be a viable replacement for say, a 335d, is that the round trip commute must fit within the battery pack's range, with zero variation in the commute.

I think a long-term solution for alternative transportation will look more like a suped-up hybrid, where a gas/diesel engine provides for follow-on driving once the battery pack is exhausted. Something like the Volt, Cmax Energi, or the i8.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-06-2014, 06:40 PM
Hangman4358 Hangman4358 is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: SoCal
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 208
Mein Auto: '14 F31 Diesel SportLine
Considering tesla already demonstrated their battery swap station taking a whole 90 seconds to swap a battery that is not the issue. The issue is the infrastructure. I test drove a model s and was this close to buying one. The only things that stopped me were the fact that the lead time was a year almost and that my wife needed a new car too so I decided to pick up two 328d wagons in Munich for just a bit more than a tesla. But i am waiting for the model x. I plan to re export the wife's wagon to germany in a few years to replace our aging 15 year old 5 er holiday car once the 4 year mantinance runs out. That kills three birds with two stones and then a tesla is not a bad option at all
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-06-2014, 07:22 PM
mrfeb14 mrfeb14 is online now
Registered User
Location: Brentwood, CA (SF Bay Area)
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 7
Mein Auto: 2009 335d
Quote:
Originally Posted by mattebury View Post
if i had the money, one would be in my garage right now
+1
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-06-2014, 07:52 PM
xi2d xi2d is offline
Registered User
Location: Northern California
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 84
Mein Auto: '12 Volt/'12 X5d (wife's)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flyingman View Post
Folks,

I was just pondering if I would consider buying a Tesla, perhaps to replace my 2010 335D in the future should I find the need.

I've seen a few, my nieghber did a test drive and really was impressed.

I thought I wouldn't like the "range" issue but realized my driving is about 95% commuting 72 miles roundtrip from home to office and back, so should have no issue recharging each evening.

I suppose no road trips in the Tesla? How would you do that?

Anyway, would like to hear others thoughts about the Tesla or any other battery operated car.
I have never driven a Tesla so cannot comment on them. Decision will depend on your budget, commute/HOV access and driving habits/preferences.

In Feb this year, I purchased a 2014 Volt at month 19 of my current 24 month 2012 Volt lease so that I could lock in: (1) quickly dwindling green CA HOV stickers for access till 2019 and (2) $1500 CA CARB rebate, which as of a couple weeks ago ran out. I will also get a $7500 federal tax credit.

The HOV access is crucial as I have a 200 mile round trip commute 4x/week, 45% in the HOV lane. I get more time with the family as it saves commute time and overnight hotel stays, less stop and go traffic stress on my body and actually partly pays for itself as I save on hotel stays due to the much easier commute. I get ~37 electric miles per charge and the gas kicks in after…...no range anxiety. It has pretty good acceleration but you can't drive it like a 335d. I am happy with the Volt and have been fortunate to lease/purchase for "forum sponsor-like prices" before generous GM/bank incentives. No road trips with the Volt; we use the X5d for family outings.

All that said, I miss my 335d
__________________
Current:




Past:
'11 335d "d3"
'10 X5 35d "d2"
'10 335d "d1"
'08 328xi

Last edited by xi2d; 04-06-2014 at 08:08 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-06-2014, 09:33 PM
Runon MD1 Runon MD1 is offline
Runon MD1
Location: Rancho Santa Fe, CA
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 400
Send a message via AIM to Runon MD1
Mein Auto: 335i Sedan
Would you consider a Tesla

"I think a long-term solution for alternative transportation will look more like a suped-up hybrid..."

Or perhaps a souped-up one...

But aside from that, Tesla's supercharging stations are a work in progress, and you apparently can add 150 miles to the car's range in about 20 minutes.

This of course requires advance planning and that there is an open charging slot when you pull in.

In addition, Tesla claims that it can swap out a battery in 90 seconds, though you may have to repeat the swap out to have your original battery reinstalled. I'm not sure of that, however.

Battery-swapping locations remain in the future, and by no means is the above totally in effect or "easy-peasy."

Extremely cold temps, hot temps (A/C usage), going uphill, etc. all impact upon usable charge life, as do periods of non-use (even overnight).

But they're working on it...

Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-07-2014, 04:34 AM
BMWTurboDzl BMWTurboDzl is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Atlanta
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 947
Mein Auto: 335D
I would consider one if I had a 2 bay garage. I wouldn't be able to road trip however due to the lack of charging opportunities at my normal destinations.

I could probably go almost a week without having to charge the car.
__________________

Last edited by BMWTurboDzl; 04-07-2014 at 04:35 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 04-07-2014, 04:45 AM
sirbikes sirbikes is offline
Registered User
Location: Wilmington, NC
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 94
Mein Auto: 2011 X5 35d
While they are nice, I need range, like 700 miles on one tank. Consumer Reports top luxury sedan was the Tesla, but the next two were diesels, the Audi A7 and I can't remember the third. They did a comparison of electric vs. diesel and while electric won on cost per mile the diesels can't be beat for range. Soon as electrics get a longer range, and the prices come down for the batteries, the ICE's days are numbered.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-07-2014, 08:01 AM
UncleJ UncleJ is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Silicon Valley
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 6,412
Mein Auto: '06 X3
The late Fisker was the long range alternative to the Tesla (sort of) in that a la Volt it had the auxiliary gas engine for long trips. However for a lot of reasons it failed -- although I have learned that a sort of cottage industry has emerged in which the remaining Fiskers are re engined with substantial domestic V8's as swoopy performance sedans. They always did look great, but were a pain to get in and out of. In kind of insult to injury the Fisker dealership on El Camino in Palo Alto is now a Tesla store! Of course, up the road a piece in Sunnyvale, the old BMW (then Acura) store is now also a Tesla store! They are everywhere around here -- in the Senior Girls' Parking lot at my daughters' old High School there were three Teslas parked amidst the assorted iron.

Last edited by UncleJ; 04-07-2014 at 08:04 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 04-07-2014, 08:15 AM
Hoooper Hoooper is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: CA
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 241
Mein Auto: 335D
Buying your kids a Tesla is actually an excellent way to make sure they don't get too far goofing around
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 04-07-2014, 08:19 AM
FredoinSF FredoinSF is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Bay Area and Reno
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 1,225
Mein Auto: 650i 330cic X5d MINI
^^^^ It's a great looking car, it's still very fresh, everyone knows it's not cheap, therefore it makes sense that the Tesla is the current poseur car in the SF Bay Area. Plus it comes with extra dose of smugness for being green.
__________________



Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 04-07-2014, 11:38 AM
anE934fun anE934fun is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: S.F. Bay Area
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 6,716
Mein Auto: 2010 335d
Quote:
Originally Posted by Runon MD1 View Post
"I think a long-term solution for alternative transportation will look more like a suped-up hybrid..."

Or perhaps a souped-up one...
Spell-checker failed me, and I was typing quickly.

Quote:
But aside from that, Tesla's supercharging stations are a work in progress, and you apparently can add 150 miles to the car's range in about 20 minutes.

This of course requires advance planning and that there is an open charging slot when you pull in.

In addition, Tesla claims that it can swap out a battery in 90 seconds, though you may have to repeat the swap out to have your original battery reinstalled. I'm not sure of that, however.

Battery-swapping locations remain in the future, and by no means is the above totally in effect or "easy-peasy."

Extremely cold temps, hot temps (A/C usage), going uphill, etc. all impact upon usable charge life, as do periods of non-use (even overnight).

But they're working on it...

All valid points, but at least at this time, the facilities are by-and-large a work in progress. Not something that I could use to support a purchase decision on a Tesla.
__________________

Last edited by anE934fun; 04-07-2014 at 11:39 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 04-07-2014, 12:13 PM
DaveN007 DaveN007 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Northern California
 
Join Date: Oct 2013
Posts: 116
Mein Auto: 2011 335d M-Sport
It all comes back around to the resources spent. Because of tiered utility rates in CA, a Tesla is about $.18 per mile for "fuel".

At $4.00 for diesel and 30 mpg, I am paying $.13 for fuel.

Turning fossil fuel into forward motion is much more efficient when done "inside the sheet metal" of my car than the equivalent generation and transmission of power to the grid... to my house... to the car ever will be.

I can plant a lot of trees with the resources I saved NOT buying a $75k car. (Base model that performs like a 335d)

I would love a Tesla Model S 85 Performance Model as a 3rd or 4th car...but they are $125k. I would probably end up getting an M5 instead.

I will get an electric car in the next couple of years. Once I can figure out how to rationalize it. Probably more like a Fiat e or other California mandated car that they lease at a loss because of government regulations.
__________________
2011 Alpine White on Brown Dakota 335d M-Sport * Premium* Cold Weather * Harmon Kardon * XM
2012 Carrara White on Black 987R (Porsche Cayman R)


Last edited by DaveN007; 04-07-2014 at 12:21 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 04-07-2014, 12:21 PM
anE934fun anE934fun is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: S.F. Bay Area
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 6,716
Mein Auto: 2010 335d
Quote:
Originally Posted by DaveN007 View Post
It all comes back around to the resources spent. Because of tiered utility rates in CA, a Tesla is about $.18 per mile for "fuel".

At $4.00 for diesel and 30 mpg, I am paying $.13 for fuel.

Turning fossil fuel into forward motion is much more efficient when done "inside the sheet metal" of my car than the equivalent generation and transmission of power to the grid... to my house... to the car ever will be.

I can plant a lot of trees with the resources I saved NOT buying a $75k car. (Base model that performs like a 335d)

I would love a Tesla Model S 85 Performance Model as a 3rd or 4th car...but they are $125k. I would probably end up getting an M5 instead.

I will get an electric car in the next couple of years. Once I can figure out how to rationalize it. Probably more like a Fiat e or other California mandated car that they lease at a loss because of government regulations.
There is too much downside (principally range anxiety) for me to bite on an electric car. My 335d seems to be a better compromise.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 04-07-2014, 07:21 PM
sirbikes sirbikes is offline
Registered User
Location: Wilmington, NC
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 94
Mein Auto: 2011 X5 35d
Presently about 37 percent of all electricity generated in the United States comes from coal. Burning coal to generate electricity to charge an electric vehicle would be insane. We have to lower the percentage from king coal, or the smugness from driving around an EV may be misplaced. Unless you charge your ev using wind or solar, clean diesel may be the most environmentally friendly right now. It may be a wash. Could you power the entire US population of passenger vehicles if they were all ev using wind and solar? The country would be blanketed by wind turbines and solar panels. I don't think that's possible.

Here's what these guys have to say: http://www.westernlithium.com/what-i...ctric-vehicles
__________________

Last edited by sirbikes; 04-07-2014 at 07:58 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 04-08-2014, 04:29 AM
BMWTurboDzl BMWTurboDzl is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Atlanta
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 947
Mein Auto: 335D
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirbikes View Post
Presently about 37 percent of all electricity generated in the United States comes from coal. Burning coal to generate electricity to charge an electric vehicle would be insane. We have to lower the percentage from king coal, or the smugness from driving around an EV may be misplaced. Unless you charge your ev using wind or solar, clean diesel may be the most environmentally friendly right now. It may be a wash. Could you power the entire US population of passenger vehicles if they were all ev using wind and solar? The country would be blanketed by wind turbines and solar panels. I don't think that's possible.

Here's what these guys have to say: http://www.westernlithium.com/what-i...ctric-vehicles
Coal has for the most part taken a back seat over the past 5 years as plants have converted to Natural Gas. Nobody is building coal and existing plants will be replaced with gas. We still export a lot however.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 04-08-2014, 07:49 AM
Hangman4358 Hangman4358 is online now
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: SoCal
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Posts: 208
Mein Auto: '14 F31 Diesel SportLine
It also depends where you are in the country. Maybe all US energy is 37% coal but that is not equally distributed. Charging a tesla in west Virginia is a lot different than charging it in California or Texas, two states where a large chunk of electricity production is via renewable or much cleaner fossil fuels like natural gas.

In such states the amount of carbon produced for charging is actually much much lower than using gasoline or diesel. Something on the order of like only 1/5th as much carbon from charging vs an ICE.

of course even in those states it differs according to where exactly you get the power from. The inefficiency is not creating power at a plant and then transmitting it to home. Even with Americans horribly inefficient grid. The biggest problem is storing energy. For a long time now cars have stored energy in the former of gas in a tank. That is a cars "battery". Electric cars store it in real batteries which just as not as efficient. If battery technology comes to a point where it can rival the energy storage capacity of gas or diesel electric cars will be much more efficient energy wise.

Asfor the battery swap and getting your old battery back. According to Musk, once the tech is real world ready you won't own a battery really. The batteries will be owned by Tesla and you just drive one around until you swap it with another at some point. Recharging at home in between swaps.
Reply With Quote
  #21  
Old 04-08-2014, 08:12 AM
wxmanCCM wxmanCCM is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: East Tennessee
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 119
Mein Auto: 2010 335d
From an emissions perspective, there are many studies which cast doubt on the environmental benefits of electric vehicles in general. A 2009 study by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) concluded that "clean diesel" technology had lower "damages" than EV technology (press release available at http://www8.nationalacademies.org/on...RecordID=12794, full report linked on that page)....


"...Diesel, which has relatively high damages in 2005, has one of the lowest levels of damage in 2030. This result is due to the substantial reductions in both PM and NOx emissions that a diesel vehicle has been required to attain after the 2006 introduction of low-sulfur fuel....

...Grid-dependent HEVs and electric vehicles have somewhat higher damages in both 2005 and 2030...." (National Academy of Sciences, "Hidden Cost of Energy: Unpriced Consequences of Energy Production and Use." Page 350 (of 506))


The NAS report mentioned that significantly higher emissions produced during the manufacturing phase of the life cycle as being a factor in EV technology's relatively high "damages".

Another very recent study (2014) concluded that EV technology does not demonstrate a clear trend toward lower life-cycle emissions of CO2, SO2, and NOx over 108 discrete scenarios. Diesel and diesel hybrid was explicitly pointed out as potentially better for reducing emissions (http://www.greencarcongress.com/2014...15-baabee.html).

Even grids which feature mostly natural gas-generated electricity do not have consistently lower well-to-wheels emissions than diesel according to Argonne National Laboratory's GREET model (GREET1_2013), including PM.
Reply With Quote
  #22  
Old 04-08-2014, 09:39 AM
BMWTurboDzl BMWTurboDzl is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Atlanta
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 947
Mein Auto: 335D
Quote:
Originally Posted by wxmanCCM View Post
From an emissions perspective, there are many studies which cast doubt on the environmental benefits of electric vehicles in general. A 2009 study by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) concluded that "clean diesel" technology had lower "damages" than EV technology (press release available at http://www8.nationalacademies.org/on...RecordID=12794, full report linked on that page)....


"...Diesel, which has relatively high damages in 2005, has one of the lowest levels of damage in 2030. This result is due to the substantial reductions in both PM and NOx emissions that a diesel vehicle has been required to attain after the 2006 introduction of low-sulfur fuel....

...Grid-dependent HEVs and electric vehicles have somewhat higher damages in both 2005 and 2030...." (National Academy of Sciences, "Hidden Cost of Energy: Unpriced Consequences of Energy Production and Use." Page 350 (of 506))


The NAS report mentioned that significantly higher emissions produced during the manufacturing phase of the life cycle as being a factor in EV technology's relatively high "damages".

Another very recent study (2014) concluded that EV technology does not demonstrate a clear trend toward lower life-cycle emissions of CO2, SO2, and NOx over 108 discrete scenarios. Diesel and diesel hybrid was explicitly pointed out as potentially better for reducing emissions (http://www.greencarcongress.com/2014...15-baabee.html).

Even grids which feature mostly natural gas-generated electricity do not have consistently lower well-to-wheels emissions than diesel according to Argonne National Laboratory's GREET model (GREET1_2013), including PM.
True but that was under a variety of scenarios of which current EV penetration was mentioned. It by no means says "it doesn't work". There are a lot of moving parts. I MO you would need world wide adoption and enforcement of emissions targets. In an extreme sense we could charge $1k/tonne for CO2 emissions, and have heavy industry relocate to another country which won't charge anything for CO2 emissions but export back to the US.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #23  
Old 04-08-2014, 01:45 PM
wxmanCCM wxmanCCM is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: East Tennessee
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 119
Mein Auto: 2010 335d
Quote:
Originally Posted by BMWTurboDzl View Post
True but that was under a variety of scenarios of which current EV penetration was mentioned. It by no means says "it doesn't work". There are a lot of moving parts. I MO you would need world wide adoption and enforcement of emissions targets. In an extreme sense we could charge $1k/tonne for CO2 emissions, and have heavy industry relocate to another country which won't charge anything for CO2 emissions but export back to the US.
I certainly don't disagree. I'm just unconvinced that EV technology is any "greener" than diesel technology, from a full life-cycle emissions perspective.

The NAS report mentioned in my previous post has lower "damages" even for pre-2007 diesel technology (and conventional gasoline technology for that matter) in its 2005 baseline assessment...




(Figure 3-7, Page 212)


Coal-generated electricity in the U.S. mix was about 50% at that time, so the "damages" at current U.S. mix isn't that high, but nevertheless, it's still unlikely to have less environmental impact than diesel, especially current technology with all of the exhaust treatment that's effectively required.

EV has other benefits of course, e.g., petroleum usage virtually eliminated and likely lower user costs, although other studies suggest it increases dependence on other materials (see, e.g., http://spectrum.ieee.org/energy/rene...n-at-any-speed).
Reply With Quote
  #24  
Old 04-08-2014, 06:03 PM
Flyingman's Avatar
Flyingman Flyingman is offline
hang up and drive!
Location: Miami
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,841
Mein Auto: 335d
Quote:
Originally Posted by sirbikes View Post
Presently about 37 percent of all electricity generated in the United States comes from coal. Burning coal to generate electricity to charge an electric vehicle would be insane. We have to lower the percentage from king coal, or the smugness from driving around an EV may be misplaced. Unless you charge your ev using wind or solar, clean diesel may be the most environmentally friendly right now. It may be a wash. Could you power the entire US population of passenger vehicles if they were all ev using wind and solar? The country would be blanketed by wind turbines and solar panels. I don't think that's possible.

Here's what these guys have to say: http://www.westernlithium.com/what-i...ctric-vehicles
Sirbikes,

I would beg to disagree. Take specific areas or regions, like the L.A. basin. Fill that basin with fossil fueled vehicles or build a single "clean" coal plant some 100 miles up the coast and change all those cars to EV, and I would argue you have made a positive impact on the environment in the L.A. Basin.

The L.A. Basin has become so polluted that ships and trains that burn Fuel Oil and Diesel oil have to be towed in by electric trains or cleaner burning tug boats in order to reduce the emissions within the basin. I've even read they want to ban gas powered lawnmowers and BBQ grills. (don't quote me on that but I do seem to recall such a thing being stated). Cruise ships will soon have to connect to shore power and shutdown their onboard diesel generators.

The problem with polution is concentration, "the solution is dilution", as I was famously told by our corporate environmental advisor.

What works and is needed in a highly populated area is completely different for remote rural areas.

I say go Nuke and EV all the way, and give away free battery recharges. People would jump at that. Throw in some free HOV lane to boot. Maybe free parking as well. The emissions problem would disappear.
__________________

Last edited by Flyingman; 04-08-2014 at 06:07 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Forum Navigation
Go Back   Bimmerfest - BMW Forums > The Best of Bimmerfest! > BMW Diesel Owners / Enthusiasts
Today's Posts Search
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off



Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:30 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
© 2001-2011 performanceIX, Inc. All Rights Reserved .: guidelines .:. privacy .:. terms