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E36/7 Z3 (1996-2002)
E36/7 Z3 Roadster, Z3 coupe, Z3 M Roadster and Z3 M Coupe talk with our gurus here.

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  #1  
Old 07-12-2010, 03:17 PM
Z3PO Z3PO is offline
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Mein Auto: 2001 BMW Z3 3.0i
Exclamation 2001 BMW Z3 3.0i - Harman Kardon Subwoofer Repair Worked!

Do you have a 2001-02 BMW Z3 3.0i Roadster with the Harman Kardon speakers?

Is your 6" subwoofer badly cracked along the outer membrane of the woofer cone? So bad that pieces of it are flaking off?

Have you tried looking for an OEM (as I did) that was inexpensive or in good shape?

Have you tried finding a 6" aftermarket sub that matched the impedance and had dual voice coils?

Do you want a nice fix for the sub, so you don't have to replace the stock BMW amps (ultimately leading to replacing most of the speakers?)

Have you aged yourself by 10 years looking for a cheap repair that solves this problem?

Well, cousin; I've got a tasty solution that costs $3.99 (plus the grifting in your respective state known as "Sales Tax" unless you live in Delaware). Sound too good to be true? Well, guess again, compadre. Buckle up, and hold on for the feel-good thrill ride of the summer.

1. Remove the subwoofer box from the car.
This is achieved by GENTLY wedging the panel located between the rollbars. Start in the front, and get the front edge popped up. Next, go to the back of the top panel, and GENTLY wedge the back of the top panel up. The back is ultra-brittle; if you do this too hard, you will break one of the receptacles that the panel tab slides into.

Next, use a phillips screwdriver, and unscrew four screws located at each corner of the subwoofer. This is obvious, as they are on the top.

Carefully lift the subwoofer box straight up, as it will still be connected with a translucent white connector. When the box is extracted, disconnect the sub wire from the connector.

Congratulations, Bob! You've removed the weakest link in the Harman Kardon system! Feels good, right? Next; let's remove the woofer from the box!

2. Removing the woofer from the box.
Okay, so on each "corner" of the speaker, there is another screw; four in total. You will need a "star bit" screwdriver to remove these. Simply remove four screws, and SAVE THEM!

Next, don't get all "Mister Grubby Thumbs" on the speaker by yanking it out. This is delicate surgery, you caveman. Carefully, wiggle the speaker, as there is a gasket located between the speaker ring frame, and the box. If it does not budge, curse at it, then get a razor blade and gently wedge it in between the box and the speaker ring frame. You may feel like it, but don't cut your wrists. You'll die, and the project will not get completed.

3. Disconnect the speaker terminals.
You will notice that this subwoofer has dual voice coils. This means twice the fun in unhooking the wires from the speaker terminals. Each wire lead has a little tab on it. Push the terminal lead tab inward whilst (yes, I said "whilst") pulling the tab away from the speaker terminal. It is a good idea to mark which wires are which. Below is a photo showing "DG" for dark green and "LG" for light green. Looking back, I could have just said "green", as there are two different sizes...you can't screw that up, right? The other side will have a black and red wire. Disconnect those the same way.

NEXT: Let's fix this bitch; the $3.99 way!
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  #2  
Old 07-12-2010, 03:27 PM
Z3PO Z3PO is offline
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Mein Auto: 2001 BMW Z3 3.0i
2001 BMW Z3 3.0i - Harman Kardon Subwoofer Repair Part 2: The Empire Strikes Back!

4. Clean out the dry rotted membrane.
My subwoofer had dry rot around the memberane of the subwoofer cone. It was so dry, that...okay...I don't have a joke here. Moving on...

So, clean out the flaky, dry remnants of a speaker that was once mediocre. Do this well, as it will pay dividends in the result. Next, flip the speaker over, and begin packing the space between the coil and the cone with strips of cloth or paper towels. The idea is to push the subwoofer up, as it normally would have sat, if BMW wouldn't have used a trunk speaker for convertibles that get UV and moisture exposure.

Here's an old chestnut for you to munch on. Pack the material a little bit at a time, then turn the speaker over, and lightly press the cone down toward the coil. If you hear a "tap" or "click", that is not normal, genius. Use more material to pack behind the parts of the cone that "tap" or "click". Keep it up!, but be sure to not pack too much in; eyeball where you think the speaker should be sitting from the front.

Below is a photo showing the packing of the sub.

NEXT: Pack the speaker!
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  #3  
Old 07-12-2010, 03:36 PM
Z3PO Z3PO is offline
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Mein Auto: 2001 BMW Z3 3.0i
2001 BMW Z3 3.0i - Harman Kardon Subwoofer Repair Part 3: The Wrath of Cone.

5. Backing the Batting Out
So, you keep packing the underside of the sub until you don't get any more "taps" or "clicks" when you press down on the cone. Now, you are saying to yourself, "Great, Z3PO; now what?" Well, here's where it gets more interesting.

Turn the speaker, so the cone is up (magnet side down). Check to see if there is excess cloth or paper towels pushing up beyond the edge of the speaker ring frame. Using white or light colored material for packing will help tremendously. If you see the material protruding, use a flathead screwdriver to carefully wedge it back down a bit. Do this all the way around the speaker. THIS IS KEY! The image below shows this.

Next, try lightly pressing on the cone to see if you get any more "tap" or "click" noises. If so, try bolstering more packing material behind the sub. There is no science to this, people..it is trial and error all the way, however...you need to make sure that (a) the material is not protruding, and (b) that the cone is not making those noises when you press it down.

NEXT: Repair the membrane! HUZZAH!
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  #4  
Old 07-12-2010, 03:44 PM
Z3PO Z3PO is offline
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6. The Good Stuff.
Take some time to visit a hardware store. I chose Lowe's. They dominate my burb. Get yourself some hella-awesome GE Brand Premium Waterproof Silicone for Window/Door/Attic/Basement. I used the 3-hour rain-ready variety. This stuff is sun, freeze, water, shrink and crack proof. In addition, it is flexible (important for a vibrating speaker), and PERMANENT! Below is a photo for reference. It cures to the touch in 3 hours. I let it fully cure for the entire 24 hour period. I'm getting excited, and when I get excited, I get ahead of myself. Let's continue.

I bought this small tube for $3.99. You simply snip the tip (your opportunity to play "moil" here) and squeeze. I snipped it on the second line. You'll want to do this, as there will be a sizeable amount you will need to fill.

NEXT: The Big Squeeze!
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  #5  
Old 07-12-2010, 03:53 PM
Z3PO Z3PO is offline
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Mein Auto: 2001 BMW Z3 3.0i
2001 BMW Z3 3.0i - Harman Kardon Subwoofer Repair; I've Run Out of Titles.

7. Give it some caulk (note the spelling; aurally, it may be offensive).
Run a bead of caulk down into the gap all along the inenr speaker frame ring. When you have done that, run a second layer over the top of that. It is important to note that wet silicone caulk does not adhere to dry silicone caulk. Do the second bead immediately! The photo below shows the awesomeness in which I apply my caulk.

When you have done that, lightly run your finger around the caulk, and smooth it. DO NOT PRESS HARD! By lightly running your finger over the second layer, you will get that caulk pressed down deep enough. Be sure to get a skim coating of the silicone caulk on the remaining membrane, so it attaches the speaker to the caulking.

NEXT: The finale!
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  #6  
Old 07-12-2010, 04:03 PM
Z3PO Z3PO is offline
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2001 BMW Z3 3.0i - Harman Kardon Subwoofer Repair; Are We Done Yet?

8. The cure is the cure.
Below is the photo of the finished product! Be sure to keep the speaker at room temperature for 24 hours. The beauty is that there is no odor to the caulk, so you could leave it indoors without killing the family with fumes.

Notice how I spread the silicone caulk so it liberally covered the remaining membrane? Good! This is very important, as it bonds the speaker to the caulk.

LET IT CURE FOR 24 HOURS! I almost tried it after 3 hours, because the packaging for the silicone said it's waterproof in that amount of time. DON'T! Let it fully cure for 24 hours; like a nice ham.

Reinstall the sub in reverse order from the first post, and let the mediocre bass hit your ears. You won't get the most awesome sound, but it works like original (I compared with existing subs) and it keeps the car OEM with the stock HK components.

The best part, is that you won't need to spend $700 on a replacement sub from BMW or an aftermarket that has the form and fit and costs $500-$700.

I'll update this if I have any issues with the repair, but be assured that I have had the bass at full, and cranked Rammstein and Shiny Toy Guns on the CD player with no pops, rattles, or other problems.

Questions? Comments? Need a pal? Post on here, and I'll reply.

Thanks, everyone!
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  #7  
Old 07-12-2010, 05:16 PM
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bten bten is offline
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looks very good to me. I think this is one for the Z3 FAQ and How-to sticky!
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  #8  
Old 07-12-2010, 06:47 PM
cincychuck cincychuck is offline
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Mein Auto: 2002 2.5 bmw z3 roadster
Great post! I also got away with a cheap fix....

My 02 Roadster's subwoofer was producing very fuzzy bass when the bass setting was any where over 20%. I thought the woofer may be toast and I would have to replace it. I decided to first stuff the box and then wrap it before ordering a new aftermarket woofer. I was surprised how much this has helped. The performance is about 70-80% improved with bass distortion only noticeable when bass is over 80% on its setting. Paint it Black now sounds as it should!

I purchased small bat of insulation for $3 from Lowe's and tore it into very small pieces to stuff the box and I used a $4 roll of self-adhesive pipe insulation (poor man's dynamat) to wrap the box. I'm sure some day I'll replace the woofer itself, but for now I am as pleased as a non-audiophile can be.

The only tools I needed were a philips head screwdriver, a torx T25 socket, and gloves for handling the insulation. Total time spent was 15 minutes.
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  #9  
Old 12-02-2010, 08:20 AM
DogFather DogFather is offline
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This looks absolutely brilliant, Z3PO. My wife's baby has the same problem, so I removed the box so that the buzzing and cracking would stop, and I planned to just deal with it later.

I've seen somewhere on the internets that you can buy replacement foam surrounds for any size speaker, and I was going to try that. I have a half-dozen old stereo speakers in the attic that need the same TLC repair. I like your method better.

My only concern is that in my case the foam surround is completely deteriorated and crumbling, all the way around. There may not be much left to work with. I haven't looked at it in a couple months, it's just sitting in the garage with a bunch of other projects I planned to get to over the winter.
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  #10  
Old 12-03-2010, 11:40 AM
kurth kurth is offline
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Cool Sub woof repair

Great story, I intend to try this. I assume that the Packing comes out before re-assembly.
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  #11  
Old 12-10-2010, 10:50 PM
calys003 calys003 is offline
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im happy that you could fix your problem but it might have been easier to buy a new sub...
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  #12  
Old 12-20-2010, 09:59 AM
bugsmasher bugsmasher is offline
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Somehow found these instructions, new to the site so still figuring out how things work.
That said, the instructions were great, the one problem I had was the back clips, I was amased when the front clips let go, but the back would not. Came back into the house and reread, tried some more, it wouldnt let go.
Like you said, not too much pressure or you will break the tabs.
Finnaly, I took a long flat blade screw driver in from the front and placed in the center of what looked like three tabs. With a little twisting motion with the scewdriver and slight pressure on the end of panel by hand one side let go. Then by raising it up slightly could see what type of clip it was.
Silicon is on the speaker now.
Thank you very much for the detailed instructions.
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  #13  
Old 01-02-2011, 10:58 AM
equill equill is offline
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just finished using the silicone-do I take out the paper towels?

It looks like the repair should work. Is your repair still working?
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  #14  
Old 01-04-2011, 02:01 PM
William Turner William Turner is offline
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For those that are a bit less DIY inclined, there are a number of places around the country (and world I imagine) that repair speakers. They seem to charge about $40. So once you have removed it, you can take/send it to a repair facility if you choose. Simply buying another subwolfer ain't that simple. BMW only sells it in the enclosure for $650+. Aftermarket units tend to require modification of the housing and most likely new amps.

If you were happy with the unit before it failed, repair is the logical choice whether you DYI or pay someone.
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  #15  
Old 01-06-2011, 04:27 PM
vivace vivace is offline
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Location: Mount Kisco, NY
 
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Mein Auto: 2002 Z3; 2003 330xi
Nifty trick. Thanks!

Just revived a 2002 Z3 that had been sitting idle for some time and took advantage of this nifty repair trick. It brought back beginning musician days, when this was a standard fix for bass guitar amplifiers, which were typically played too loudly for anybody's good! In a fix, airplane glue also works to reattach the cone to the material of the speaker. It's been a while since I used that one, too. Can you still get airplane glue? Anyway, if the cone has separated from the paper, the glue can be layered on to stiffen and reinforce the center.

The best advice probably is to have someone repair the speaker, though. Now that I've figured out how easily the subwoofer unit comes out, I will get the speaker reconed eventually, but I have used this repair in the short term and I am very happy with the results.
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  #16  
Old 01-06-2011, 10:03 PM
Mike Clark Mike Clark is offline
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I took mine out and had it repaired at a specialty shop in Tampa. A year later it was blown again. A little more research told me that the unit could not handle the power of the amp if at loud levels (i.e. top down at 70 mph, turn volume up). Switched to the BMW Carver Surefire amp and sub which cured the problem. The Carver limited the power to the sub at high volume levels so it would not blow.
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  #17  
Old 06-27-2011, 02:52 PM
doc280 doc280 is offline
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Thumbs up This works great!

My 2001 M Roadster has 31,000 miles and is always garage kept. The sub in the past few weeks has started sounding, well like crap. I read this post and decided this fix was worth a try, even though my wife rolled her eyes, to the idea.
I followed the instructions and removed the sub box from the car and at first look at the woofer, it looked perfect. There were no signs of any degrading to any part of the woofer and I started thinking, great this is really going to cost me. I proceeded to remove the woofer from the box and once removed, the plastic ring on the front of the woofer came off. Ok, no big deal as it looks to be just a spacer and with it out of the way it gives an even better look at the woofer itself. The woofer still looked perfect, but when I pushed on the outer surface, I found that the material which the plastic spacer sits against had a perfect cut. I mean it looked as if someone had taken a razor blade and cut the material all the way around the woofer.
To repair this I followed the instructions in this post, except for stuffing the rear of the woofer. Every time I tried this it made a gap in the woofer material. Without the spacer you can see and have better access to apply the silicone. I put a light coat where the cut was and continued the light coat where the bottom of the spacer would be. I then replaced the spacer and continued to apply silicone as per the post.
I waited the required 24 hours and reinstalled, turned on the stereo and wow, it has not sounded this good in a long time.
This fix does work and looks as if it will correct the unattended design flaw, of the spacer cutting the woofer.
Thanks, so much for your post.
Keith
P.S. the wife is no longer rolling her eyes.

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  #18  
Old 06-27-2011, 08:17 PM
vivace vivace is offline
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Congratulations on the sub! Mine is still holding up fine and, though I intend to do the complete cone speaker repair at some point, I am in no hurry. There's no shortage of other things I can spend money on. My latest is the rear window replacement. I found great advice on the board about that, too.

Enjoy, but not too loudly.
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  #19  
Old 06-28-2011, 06:22 AM
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LauraM LauraM is offline
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Ha! I don't know if I even have a subwoofer but I read the entire write-up because of your fun writing style. Thanks!
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  #20  
Old 07-12-2011, 06:44 AM
WDKIK WDKIK is offline
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Smile A Newbie Joins

Hello Everyone,

Just joined this fabulous site that I have observed for many years, but only decide to join yesterday after reading the excellent write up by Z3PO on repairing the HK Subwoofer. Thank you!

So here is the releationship...Wifes Car (Wilma's), Z3 3.0i with lots of Dinan Performance extra's. Me (Ian) not allowed to drive said vehicle unless express permission given, therefore in last 10 years, I have only driven the Car 5 times...The most enjoyable time was when going to the BMW Homecoming in 2004, I-40 through the Mountains at 02:00hrs was lots of fun...Shame wife got tired of driving...Not

Anyway glad to part of the Community
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  #21  
Old 07-12-2011, 04:09 PM
WDKIK WDKIK is offline
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Location: Cincinnati
 
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Smile HK Subwoofer Fixed

I'm pleased to say the Z3PO fix worked like a charm, played a Fleetwood Mac CD with plenty of Bass and "Viola", as good as when it was last working properly.

As a matter of interest, other than being quoted $635 for Subwoofer and Sound Box from local BMW dealer, they kindly offered to install the offending item for a mire $200+ Tax...I politely refused...What made me laugh, was when the Parts Guy asked if there was anything else he could do for me today. I should have said, "Yes" call me an Ambulance, I'm about to have a Heart Attack
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  #22  
Old 07-28-2011, 11:04 AM
Pilot Dane Pilot Dane is offline
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I have just performed the silicone repair and it seems to have mostly worked but I'm worried about a subtle "clank" that I hear when lightly tapping on one side of the cone. On one side it just makes a dull "thud" like you would expect but on the other side there is a "clank" like two hard pieces are hitting. Has anyone else experienced this? I can not spot anything causing the sound so I'm wondering if there is something loose in the voice coil.
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  #23  
Old 07-29-2011, 04:51 AM
doc280 doc280 is offline
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This repair has been working like a charm, I am very happy. As for your "clank" sound, I did not hear this out of mine and for the life of me can not think of what could be causing it. But I will confess I am no speaker expert.
Keith
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  #24  
Old 07-29-2011, 06:35 AM
Pilot Dane Pilot Dane is offline
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Luckily I used a bad tube of silicone. After 24 hours it was still showing no signs of curing so I removed it all this morning (messy). I cut off the domed dust cover in the center of the speaker and could see that the voice coil was not exactly centered over the pole piece. Apparently when I siliconed the surround I did not have it centered. I put some shims (folded up pieces of paper) around the voice coil & center post to make sure it was centered and then re-siliconed the surround. It's drying now but in a few hours I should be able to remove the shims and see if I got it centered this time. If it's good I'll silicone the center dust cap back in place end enjoy the quality sounds of this little sub .

---
And totally off topic, my wife has been jealous of my 2000 M roadster for years. Well, yesterday my folks gave her their black 2001 3 liter with 35k miles and an automatic transmission. Luckily when I built the toy car garage a few years ago I made it big enough for two Z's.
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  #25  
Old 08-01-2011, 05:13 PM
csz3m csz3m is offline
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Worked Beautifully!

Thanks Z3PO for the fix! I ended up using cotton balls for "packing" the woofer, let the silicone dry for 24 hours and I can now listen to music on the radio again! Just follow the instructions to the letter and you can't go wrong. Simple fix.
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