Welcome to Bimmerfest -- The #1 Online Community for BMW related information! Please enjoy the discussion forums below and share your experiences with the 200,000 current, new and past BMW owners. The forums are broken out by car model and into other special interest sections such as BMW European Delivery and a special forum to voice your questions to the many BMW dealers on the site to assist our members!

Please follow the links below to help get you started!

Go Back   Bimmerfest - BMW Forums > BMW Model Discussions > 5 Series > E39 (1997 - 2003)

E39 (1997 - 2003)
The BMW 5-Series (E39 chassis) was introduced in the United States as a 1997 model year car and lasted until the 2004 when the E60 chassis was released. The United States saw several variations including the 525i, 528i, 530i and 540i. -- View the E39 Wiki

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #51  
Old 07-27-2010, 02:57 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Quote:
Originally Posted by supradupe View Post
Once you slacken the belt, take it out of the track, you will loop it over the fan, into the space between the fan and fan shroud.
The weirdest thing happened. I was frustrated because I couldn't get the fan clutch nut off (everyone else says you have to, including cn90 so I was trying to do the right thing).

I was so frustrated, I stopped to water the plants outside. When I came back, I gave it one more try ... and guess what ... with just my bare hands (after having banged for a half hour prior with a hammer), I scissored the two tools (counterhold and 32mm wrench) and ... voila! The fan clutch nut spun right off.

Amazing what a little break will do for your frustration!

Anyway, I can NOT get the viscous fan out of there w/o removing the shroud. My plan is to:
a) Follow cn90's instructions as much as possible (Bentleys stink)
b) Replace both belts
c) Remove the alternator
d) Inspect what is making noise (as per this thread)

Anyway, to your point ... HOW do I "loosen" the belts now? I'm sure I need to start understanding the two mechanical tensioners I have in order to figure that out, right?

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	fan_clutch_nut_off_but_why.jpg
Views:	1433
Size:	225.3 KB
ID:	239953  
Reply With Quote
  #52  
Old 07-27-2010, 03:13 PM
DHoang's Avatar
DHoang DHoang is offline
Gearhead
Location: Austin, Texas
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 985
Mein Auto: '98 528i, '82 323i
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post


Anyway, I can NOT get the viscous fan out of there w/o removing the shroud.
I was able to remove mine out of the shroud by shifting and lifting the fan out from underneath my car.
__________________
http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/picture.php?albumid=4132&pictureid=24642
Reply With Quote
  #53  
Old 07-27-2010, 03:44 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Unhappy

Quote:
Originally Posted by DHoang View Post
I was able to remove my fan out of the shroud by shifting and lifting the fan out from underneath my car.
It might be doable to remove the fan but to what end? The biggest problem I have right now is the lack of directions for MY vehicle (aioros is the closest) but he was doing an entire cooling system overhaul.

At this point, I think I'm on STEP 4 of cn90's 7-step instructions:
4. Apply Clockwise tension of the Tensioner to remove the drive belt.
Check your tensioner with a mirror to see if you have Allen or Torx head.

But, again, I'm stymied by not having enough room. I can see the two mechanical tensioners but I can't even see WHERE the "adjustment screw" is, let alone whether it's an allen or torx.

I'm soooo confused. Where exactly do I twist to loosen the tension on the belts from the mechanical tensioners so that I can pull off the two belts?

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	where_do_we_loosen_belt_tension.jpg.jpg
Views:	1239
Size:	406.0 KB
ID:	239959  
Reply With Quote
  #54  
Old 07-27-2010, 04:14 PM
five.two.five five.two.five is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Los Angeles, Ca
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 219
Mein Auto: 2002 525I
Have you tried using a box wrench on the bolt on the tensioner and turning it clockwise? You should be able to relieve the tension on the belt and slide it off the spines on the pullies.
Reply With Quote
  #55  
Old 07-27-2010, 04:15 PM
pleiades pleiades is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: .
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,214
Mein Auto: .
On the AC mechanical tensioner, that hex-nut-shaped piece is what you turn clockwise with your socket wrench (14 mm? I forget).

If the Alt/PS/WP tensioner is a mechanical type, it will have this same nut protrusion on it for the same purpose. If it is a hydraulic tensioner, the part you turn will be the nut -under- the plastic cap on the pulley, and if hydraulic it may be a 7 or 8mm allen, also turn this clockwise, and it will probably be tight...
Reply With Quote
  #56  
Old 07-27-2010, 04:17 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
I can't even see WHERE the "adjustment screw" is, let alone whether it's an allen or torx.
Ah, I went to water some plants (the hose is running constantly, I just move it from spot to spot), and when I came back, I looked up the Pelican DIY and saw that I must first remove the plastic caps on the AC belt mechanical tensioners with an 1/8th inch screwdriver (the AC belt removal precedes the serpentine belt removal).

Beneath that black plastic cap was a T50 Torx.

Now the problem is that there just isn't room for the Torx wrench on the lower tensioner because the centerline of the torx adjustment screw is exactly on the lip of the lower fan shroud.

Now I know why folks said to remove the fan shroud. It's back to the Bentleys ...

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1_pry_off_the_plastic_cap.jpg
Views:	117
Size:	215.6 KB
ID:	239969   Click image for larger version

Name:	2_there_is_just_enough_room_for_the_t50_torx.jpg
Views:	1604
Size:	237.5 KB
ID:	239970   Click image for larger version

Name:	3_but_not_enough_room_for_the_torx_socket.jpg
Views:	1916
Size:	204.9 KB
ID:	239971  
Reply With Quote
  #57  
Old 07-27-2010, 04:34 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Quote:
Originally Posted by five.two.five View Post
Have you tried using a box wrench on the bolt on the tensioner
Sorry I didn't see this until now. It takes me about 10 or 15 minutes per post (with all the pictures) so we crossed at the same time.

I see there is a T50 Torx on one half the tensioner (after removing the cover plate) and a molded 16mm bolt head on the other half of the tensioner.

What are these two things for? Which one, for example, is for loosening the belt tension?

Quote:
Originally Posted by pleiades View Post
On the AC mechanical tensioner, that hex-nut-shaped piece is what you turn clockwise with your 16mm socket
The 16mm hex nut molded onto the 2nd half of the mechanical tensioner I can at least get to. I don't have a 16mm socket (I have 15mm and 17mm) but I do have a 16mm box wrench which fits perfectly.

Now, the question is ... what is the purpose of these two:
- The T50 Torx under the plastic cap of the first half of the tensioner
- The 16mm molded nut on the second half of the tensioner

How DO these things work? (i.e., which adjustment is the right one to adjust the tension?)

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	how_do_I_adjust_tensioners.jpg
Views:	8330
Size:	228.9 KB
ID:	239975  
Reply With Quote
  #58  
Old 07-27-2010, 04:39 PM
pleiades pleiades is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: .
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,214
Mein Auto: .
On -mechanical tensioners, you have that 16 mm molded nut to turn clockwise and counter the force of the huge spring built inside the tensioner base. The torx bolt is simply the axle of the pulley wheel. You only need to turn it when you are replacing the pulley wheel.


On hydraulic tensioners, you probably won't have a molded nut. The only thing you can turn (clockwise!) to release tension will be the center of the pulley wheel (torx, allen, hex ... not sure). I believe the Bentley has a good illustration in its maintenance section....


Page 020-17...

Last edited by pleiades; 07-27-2010 at 04:43 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #59  
Old 07-27-2010, 04:53 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Quote:
Originally Posted by pleiades View Post
On -mechanical tensioners, you have that 16 mm molded nut to turn clockwise and counter the force of the huge spring built inside the tensioner base. The torx bolt is simply the axle of the pulley wheel. You only need to turn it when you are replacing the pulley wheel
I got it.
- The 16mm molded nut is to loosen spring tension momentarily (by leverage)
- The T50 torx bolt is just to hold on the axle of the pulley

Good thing because I can't get a socket onto the T50 Torx but I have no problem getting a box wrench around the lower tensioner 16mm molded nut.

The alternator belt is now off! Now on to the serpentine belt!

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	1_no_pressure_on_16mm_box.jpg
Views:	1217
Size:	153.2 KB
ID:	239982   Click image for larger version

Name:	2_pressure_on_16mm_box.jpg
Views:	3588
Size:	154.7 KB
ID:	239983  
Reply With Quote
  #60  
Old 07-27-2010, 05:00 PM
pleiades pleiades is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: .
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,214
Mein Auto: .
Keep in mind, you are releasing tension on the belt, but the tensioner spring is actually building more force when you do this, so be careful, wear eye protection etc....
Reply With Quote
  #61  
Old 07-27-2010, 06:00 PM
mmm635's Avatar
mmm635 mmm635 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Jackson, MS
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,179
Mein Auto: '02 525i Sp/5, 95 FJ80 LC
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
I got it.
- The 16mm molded nut is to loosen spring tension momentarily (by leverage)
- The T50 torx bolt is just to hold on the axle of the pulley

Good thing because I can't get a socket onto the T50 Torx but I have no problem getting a box wrench around the lower tensioner 16mm molded nut.

The alternator belt is now off! Now on to the serpentine belt!
Yes, if you stick a dowel or cotter pin in there it will lock it into place. Then you just release it after you have your belt back on and then it will re-tension.

Also, to answer your question in one of your posts about a reference the Bentley makes. In the picture below you will see the ICV behind the DISA valve. On the left side you will see the electrical connector and on the right side the pipe that leads into the intake elbow is the other reference.




__________________

Last edited by mmm635; 07-28-2010 at 06:11 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #62  
Old 07-27-2010, 06:13 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Quote:
Originally Posted by pleiades View Post
you are releasing tension on the belt, but the tensioner spring is actually building more force
Both belts are now off!

I learned a few more things attacking the upper mechanical tensioner for the main serpentine belt.

First off, a 16mm socket helps immensely. I finally found a half-inch 16mm socket (which I now treasure) in the toolbox and that helps because you can't even SEE where the 16mm socket end goes (or the 16mm box wrench).

Also, the upper mechanical tensioner seems to take much more FORCE to unspring so, as you noted, is much more dangerous. I almost pinched my fingers between the belt and the pulley slipping off the pulley.

Thirdly, here is where removing the fan shroud and/or the upper radiator hose on the driver's side would help greatly to provide room to maneuver!

Fourth, I learned, after the fact, that it would have been muuuuch easier to access the 16mm molded bolt for the upper tensioner from UNDERNEATH the car. When I went down there to take the picture, I could see a lot better (the belt was removed by then though so it wasn't in the way).

One question: I spun all the rollers and some spin easily, some not at all, and one, in particular, spins like molasses is inside. Since I have a whining noise on startup for the first five or ten minutes, can you help me with what is supposed to be normal?

- waterpump pulley ==> spins 3 to 5 times quietly when spun (probably OK)
- crankshaft pulley ==> does not rotate by hand (I'm sure that's OK)
- power steering pulley ==> goes about 1/4 rotation when spun (probably OK)
- AC compressor pulley ==> spins about 3 or 4 turns silently (probably OK)
- alternator pulley ==> spins about 1 or 2 turns silently (probably OK)
- upper tensioner pulley ==> spins 10 or so turns noisily (probably BAD)
- lower tensioner pulley ==> spins about 15 turns barely audible (probably on its way out)
- idler roller ==> won't spin at all; very hard to spin; can't even get a tenth of a turn by spinning it by hand (this sounds BAD ... is it?)

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	just_how_to_adjust_upper_tensioner.jpg
Views:	96
Size:	111.5 KB
ID:	239990   Click image for larger version

Name:	16mm_socket_from_below_helps.jpg
Views:	1195
Size:	126.5 KB
ID:	239991  
Reply With Quote
  #63  
Old 07-27-2010, 06:26 PM
pleiades pleiades is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: .
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,214
Mein Auto: .
My guess is the pulleys on the tensioners probably spin easily -because- their bearing grease is dried out. The idler pulley that doesn't want to spin may be that way because it still has good grease... but if it's as old as the rest, it may need replacing.

You could remove the pulleys from the tensioner assemblies (idler is on its own long bolt) and fairly easily lift up the seals and check the grease. I looked at one I just recently replaced; spins easily but the grease in there is all dry, green and waxy ....
Reply With Quote
  #64  
Old 07-27-2010, 07:01 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Quote:
Originally Posted by pleiades View Post
My guess is the pulleys on the tensioners probably spin easily -because- their bearing grease is dried out.
Interesting. Here I was thinking the free-spinning ones were good and the slow-spinning ones were bad.

Right now, I'm gonna get back to the alternator, as per cn90's seven steps to alternator repair ... I'm on step 5 and 6, both done.

5. D/C red cable on the back of Alternator (13-mm nut).
Also D/C rectangular connector in the back.

6. Undo the PS Reservoir (13-mm) and set it aside.
No need to disconnect any hoses.


Interestingly, the power steering bottom hose is leaking visibly (as Cam has always noted, due to the lousy crimp clamps BMW uses). I'll get to that later for it's getting late in the day for the alternator.

Moving on to the final step, #7 ... it's time to remove the two alternator holding bolts.

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	alternator 002.jpg
Views:	2845
Size:	104.5 KB
ID:	240001   Click image for larger version

Name:	alternator 004.jpg
Views:	135
Size:	160.8 KB
ID:	240002   Click image for larger version

Name:	alternator 005.jpg
Views:	130
Size:	158.8 KB
ID:	240003   Click image for larger version

Name:	alternator 006.jpg
Views:	470
Size:	168.4 KB
ID:	240004  
Reply With Quote
  #65  
Old 07-27-2010, 07:49 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Quote:
Originally Posted by cn90 View Post
7. Alternator is held by two (2) 16-mm bolts. The UPPER bolt also holds the idler pulley.
I finished step 7 of Cam's alternator DIY, which was to remove the two 16mm bolts holding the alternator on and to wiggle off the unclamped air duct from the bottom rear of the alternator housing.

These bolts came out without drama. I needed a two-inch socket extension bar for the lower bolt, and both were easier to get out from underneath the car, but, that was about it.

Now it's kind of anti-climactic that I have the alternator and the idler pulley in my hands. What do I do now!

I guess I'll head off to a Kragen or Autozone to see if they can bench test the alternator. It's also time to see where I can buy a remanufactured Bosch 120 amp alternator locally for not too much money.

Thanks for all your help! The Bentleys were (nearly) useless, and all the DIYs and your just-in-time advice helped me do this, my very first teardown ever in my BMW. Too bad I didn't have some spare cooling system and belt drive parts 'cuz it's a shame not to replace them now that it's all ripped open.

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	alt_and_idler_pulley.jpg
Views:	1558
Size:	151.3 KB
ID:	240019   Click image for larger version

Name:	alt_power_steering_out_of_the_way.jpg
Views:	158
Size:	172.2 KB
ID:	240020   Click image for larger version

Name:	alt_remove_air_duct.jpg
Views:	119
Size:	166.0 KB
ID:	240021   Click image for larger version

Name:	alt_remove_totally.jpg
Views:	724
Size:	161.5 KB
ID:	240022  
Reply With Quote
  #66  
Old 07-27-2010, 07:54 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Before I forget, here is what I laboriously typed up as I was doing the alternator and drive belts R&R so that others can benefit from the effort.
NOTE: For convenience for the reader, I've updated it as I went along so some steps are described which are shown in detail in later posts.

Goal: Replace major belt-drive system components:
- Remove alternator (OEM Bosch 120 amp, P/N AL0703X, 0 124 5 15 050)
- Remove AC drive belt
- Remove alternator/ps/wp drive belt
- Remove idler pulley
- Remove AC belt lower tensioner (OEM INA)
- Remove alternator belt upper tensioner (OEM INA)
- Inspect for other worn components

Tools:
- 1 cooling fan counterhold wrench BMW 11.5.030; aka pulley holding tool
- 1 thin 32 mm long box-crescent combination wrench
- 1 alternator pulley nut removal tool BMW 12.7.110 (optional)
- 1 4-amp 12V battery charger
- Socket wrenches (16mm, 13mm, 6mm) & extensions
- Box wrenches (17mm, 16mm, 10mm)
- Screwdrivers (#2 Philips, 3/16ths inch flathead)
- Two spare allen wrenches to use as tensioner pins (Metric: 5mm fits, 6mm does not) (SAE 3/16ths fits, 7/32 does not)
- T50 Torx, L-shaped
- 1 can anti-sieze paste

Description of system:
- BMW 2002 525i;M54 engine;A5S.325Z automatic transmission;
- Bosch 120amp air-cooled alternator with multi-function control
- INA mechanical belt tensioners for both belts
- belt-driven mechanical cooling fan with viscous clutch (controls fan speed)
- cooling cassette in front of the radiator (cools the ATF, PS, oil, & AC)
- electrically-heated thermostat
- auxiliary electric cooling fan
- auxiliary coolant pump from base of fan shroud on drivers side
- outside (shorter) belt turns the AC compressor
- inner (longer) belt turns alternator, water pump, & power steering pump

Summary of the nine removal steps (supplied by cn90):
0. Leave fan shroud in place & you leave the fan loose inside the shroud
1. Disconnect battery positive terminal in the trunk with 10mm box wrench
2. Remove the mass-air filter housing (a few 6mm hose clamps & a 10mm bolt)
3. Undo fan clutch nut with 32-mm thin wrench & 45-mm spacing counterhold tool
4. Apply clockwise force (16mm) to each tensioner to remove both drive belts.
5. Disconnect power (13-mm) & rectangular connector in back of alternator
6. Unbolt the PS reservoir bracket (two 13-mm bolts) and set it aside.
7. Remove two alternator 16-mm bolts; the upper bolt also holds idler pulley
8. Remove upper mechanical tensioner (two 13mm bolts) with spring extended
9. Remove lower mechanical tensioner (two 13mm bolts) with spring compressed
10. Wait for new parts to arrive (alternator, idler, & mechanical tensioners)

Steps to remove your air cleaner in preparation to remove the alternator:
- Set up your computer in your work area with Internet access to Bimmerfest
- Grab a box of nitrile gloves and a solvent cleaner & roll of paper towels
- Disconnect both battery cables with a 10mm box wrench (to be safe)
- Optional: Put the battery on a charger of less than 16.5V, 6amps capacity

Remove the engine air filter & MAF sensor housing:
- Loosen intake duct hose clamp at throttle assembly with a 3/16th flathead
(or, better yet as I belatedly learned, with a 6mm socket on an extension)
- Spread plastic clip to remove remove 1/4" idle control hose from intake duct
- Spread open two metal clips holding mass air flow sensor
- I tried to disconnect idle speed control valve harness connector but
I just can't find it, not from the Bentley pictures, nor from looking
- Disconnect harness connector from mass air flow sensor (press & pull)
- Remove air filter housing mounting screw with a 10mm socket or box wrench
- Disconnect vent tube by pulling back on the soft rubber with your hands
- Loosen air intake duct clamp with a 3/16ths flathead screwdriver
- I had to remove the MAF sensor housing in order to gain room
- I had to remove the engine air filter in order to gain leverage
- I had to twist the hard plastic vent tube out of the way to gain room
- Nobody tells you there is an unclamped hose at the BOTTOM of the
engine side of the air intake hose just after the MAF that holds it all up!
- Since there was no clamp on that bottom hose, I was on my own
(no instructions in the Bentleys mentioned any of this!)
- I elected to remove the two hose clamps near the engine on the large
3-inch air intake hose with a 3/16ths flathead screwdriver (or better yet,
with a 6mm socket on a 1/4 inch ratchet driver handle)
- Only after loosening those additional two hose clamps was I able to lift
the engine air intake up and back over the engine.
- This engine air intake is still connected to the engine by a pair of
what looks like vacuum hoses which I couldn't get loose for fear of
breaking the plastic nipple, so I left it all connected draped over
the engine
- Optional: I dumped leaf remnants out of the air filter housing inlet
- Optional: I put the 10mm bolt back so as not to lose it
- Optional: I tightened the three hose clamps so as to not lose them
in the ensuing battle; it was then that I realized a 6mm
socket on a 1/4" socket handle would have been easier than
the screwdriver (and updated the appropriate step above)
- Optional: While the MAF was removed, I hit it with a dozen pulses of
special MAF cleaner (aka xylene) and let air dry
- For the first time, I was able to feel the alternator belt tension,
which felt solid

Note: I still don't know if I was supposed to disconnect those two small
hoses still connected, or if I was supposed to pull on the one-inch
wide hose w/o a clamp that is still connected under the MAF closer
to the engine. But the air cleaner is off and to the side for now.

Steps to remove the mechanical fan viscous fan clutch:
- Lift car with jack under the engine pad & place jack stands on jack pads
- Set parking brake and chock both rear wheels
- Twirl fan blade; check that fan clutch spins it twice after you let it go
- Mine spun about a quarter of a turn after I let it go (both directions)
- Let the engine cool down if it was used recently.
- Apply WD40 to fan clutch nut
- From below, remove under-engine plastic shroud (9 P2 Phillips head screws)
- Each phillips head screw twists out in a single turn & stays with the shroud
- First place the fan counterhold tool (45 mm hole spacing) on the viscous
fan pulley nuts so that you can hold the pulley from turning
- Then place the 32mm thin long open-end wrench on the viscous fan nut.
- Scissor the two 16-inch long tools, twisting the left-hand threaded
viscous fan nut clockwise to remove (holding back with the counterhold tool)
- Once you crack the nut loose, spin it off by hand and place the fan
tucked out of the way in the well of the radiator shroud
- Removing the viscous fan gives you a lot more room to maneuver

Steps to remove the AC belt and the serpentine drive belt:
- Snap photographs or better yet, draw a diagram of the belt pathways.
- The outside (shorter) belt turns the AC compressor
- The inner (longer) belt turns alternator, water pump, & power steering pump
- The AC belt is thinner than its grooves so make special note before removal.
- My larger belt went from the top of the alternator -> to the outside of the
power steering pump --> to the engine-side groove of the crankshaft
pulley --> around the pulley almost 360 degrees to the idler roller
upside down curling around the idler roller from the bottom --> then to
the bottom of the water pump pulley and around the water pump --> then
again upside down to the very bottom 15 degrees of the upper mechanical
tensioner --> over to the top of the alternator pulley.
- My smaller belt went from the top of the compressor --> over to the top
of the crankshaft pulley around the bottom of the crankshaft pulley -->
over to the top 15 degrees of the lower mechanical tensioner --> back
over to the bottom of the AC compressor pulley.
- Find two small allen wrenches that you should insert into the tabs in
the two mechanical tensioners to keep the tension off until you're ready
to replace the belts (and to free up access to the 13mm mounting bolts)
- To remove alternator belt (it has to come off first), place a 16mm
box wrench on the lower mechanical tensioner and turn the box wrench
clockwise; this will loosen tension so you can slip the allen wrench
into the holes when the moving hole lines up with the stationary hole
- Once the lower mechanical tensioner is locked in the open position,
slip the alternator belt off the pulleys.
- Optional: Spin the pulley of the lower mechanical tensioner with the
belt removed; if you hear a "dry sound", it needs to be replaced.

- Note: If you wish to remove the pulley on the mechanical tensioner,
you will need an L-shaped T50 Torx wrench or you will need to remove
the fan shroud as there is not enough room for a socket or screwdriver
T50 Torx wrench between the mechanical tensioner pulley and the lower
lip of the fan shroud. However some say the they don't sell the pulley
separately so you need to remove both 13mm bolts holding the mechanical
tensioner in place, one of which will be a bear to access.

- The upper mechanical tensioner will be harder to access the 16mm leverage
nut. It can be accessed from the top with a 16mm socket wrench or even
easier from the bottom. Turn the wrench clockwise and this will lesson
the tension on the belt so that you can slip the belt off after inserting
your second spare allen wrench into the holes as they align with your
tension.

- With both belts off, spin the pulleys by hand. Here is what I found:
- waterpump pulley ==> spins 3 to 5 times quietly when spun (probably OK)
- crankshaft pulley ==> does not rotate by hand (I'm sure that's OK)
- power steering pulley ==> goes about 1/4 rotation when spun (probably OK)
- AC compressor pulley ==> spins about 3 or 4 turns silently (probably OK)
- alternator pulley ==> spins about 1 or 2 turns silently (probably OK)
- upper tensioner pulley ==> spins 10 or so turns noisily (probably BAD)
- lower tensioner pulley ==> spins about 15 turns barely audible (probably on its way out)
- idler roller ==> won't spin at all; very hard to spin; can't even get a tenth of a turn

Steps to remove the alternator:
- Remove the 17mm plastic-tipped nut for the red power cord from the back
of the alternator using a 17mm box wrench
- Press the pin and remove the top harness connector from the back of the
alternator
- With a 13mm socket and an extension bar, remove the two bolts holding the
power steering reservoir bracket and position power steering reservoir safely
Note: Once the alternator is removed, loosely put the power steering pump
back on its brackets to prevent leakage and hose stress.
- Notice the bottom hose may be leaking; see cn0 fix for that.
- Leave the power steering hoses (for now); this just gives you access to
the two 16mm holding bolts for the alternator bracket.
- The upper 16mm alternator holding bolt is the bolt holding on the idler
pulley; while the lower 16mm bolt is on the alternator bracket alone.
- It's easier to get to both the 16mm holding bolts from below than from
above.
- The upper holding bolt is removed with a 16mm socket and the lower one
requires a short two-inch extension and socket.
- Wiggle the unclamped plastic air duct off the bottom back of the alternator
- Now just wiggle the alternator out; it came out easily for me.
- You'll also have the idler pulley in your hands at this time.

To remove lower mechanical air conditioning belt tensioner:
- Tools: 13mm and 16mm socket, 3-inch socket extension
- Spare allen wrench, 5mm diameter (or 3/16ths of an inch)
- From underneath, turn the 16mm molded nut clockwise till the tabs line up
- Slip the spare 5mm allen wrench into the two tabs to lock them in place
- With a 13mm box wrench on a 3-inch extension, remove both bolts
- Remove lower mechanical air conditioning tensioner
- Leave the spare allen wrench in place (how do you safely remove it?)
- Mark the tensioner as the AC tensioner (they are slightly different)
Note: AC mechanical tensioners were redesigned in 8/2002 so compare with new
Note: How do we safely remove the spare allen wrench in the old tensioner?

To remove upper mechanical alternator/ps/wp belt tensioner:
- Tools: 13mm & 16mm socket, 3-inch socket extension
- Unlike the lower tensioner, you need to REMOVE the hold-fast pin
- Turn clockwise on the 16mm molding to release tension on the hold-fast pin
- Remove your hold-fast pin placed during the belt-removal process
- With a 13mm box wrench, remove the lower & upper 13mm tensioner bolts
- Remove the upper mechanical air conditioning tensioner from the engine
- Mark the tensioner as the alt/ps/wp tensioner (they are slightly different)

Summary:
- Both belts are off the car
- The alternator and idler pulley are off the car
- Both mechanical tensioners are off the car
- The engine air cleaner and MAF housing are off (tucked on top of engine)
- The mechanical viscous fan clutch is off (tucked next to radiator)
- The power steering reservoir is off (hoses still attached)
- The fan shroud, radiator, and all radiator hoses are intact

Note: Lightly coat the water pump pulley flange with anti-seize where it
contacts the pulley. Avoid getting anti-seize in the bolt holes.
The anti-seize helps prevent the pulley from fusing to the flange.
Also coat the viscous fan nut with the anti-sieze paste.

Note: You should replace a bad idler pulley, but you can repack as per cn90:
- Use a hook and gently pry the rubber seal.
- Soak the bearing in a small container with gasoline to wash out old grease.
- Then repack with new grease.
- Gently re-apply the seal, taking care not to damage it.

Parts to replace when working on the belt drive system:
- 1 serpentine drive belt
- 1 A/C drive belt
- 1 idler roller
- 2 mechanical tensioners (includes roller)

Parts to replace when working on the cooling system:
- 1 gallon BMW antifreeze & 1 gallon distilled water ($25) (2.8 total gallons)
- phospate free, amine & nitrite/nitrate free, & low silicate or silicate free
- e.g., BMW, Valvoline Zerex G-05, or Prestone Extended Life 5/150

- 1 expansion tank ($50)
--- At least 3 hoses connect to the expansion tank, plus a sensor
-->1st hose is on the top from expansion nipple to radiator under shroud
-->2nd hose is on the bottom from expansion tank to auxiliary water pump
-->3rd hose is on the bottom, from expansion tank to (somewhere)

- 1 radiator (Nissens/Behr) ($175)
--- At least 2 hoses connect to the radiator
--> 1st is the upper radiator hose ($10)
--> 2nd is the lower radiator hose ($10)

There seem also to be at least two more hoses:
- 1 thermostat hose ($10)
- 1 radiator bypass hose ($10)

Major spinning parts:
- 1 electrically heated thermostat & plastic housing ($50)
- 1 water pump with o-ring (Hepu, GMB-OE, EMP/Stewart)
- 1 water pump pulley (plus 4 water pump pulley bolts and 4 nuts)
- 1 fan clutch, consider Sachs ($100)
- 1 fan blade assembly

Sensors:
- Coolant level sensor in the bottom of the expansion tank (you can re-use your old one)
- Automatic-transmission thermostat (may break when removing expansion tank)
- 1 coolant temp sensor (in the lower radiator hose); or re-use old one
but then you need a new 0-ring which often fails when re-using the sensor; these 0-rings are hard to find
- Note the top (stick) half of the level sensor comes with the expansion tank

And a few odds and ends:
- 2 bleeder screws (consider brass at $10/set)
- Buy an extra clip that secures expansion tank to shroud (the bleeder screw
sits in the middle of this coolant reservoir mounting clip which often breaks)
- What is the special crimp tool to get (e.g., for the nipple-to-expansion-tank hose)?
- Who is a good supplier for the entire cooling system clamp set?
- 1 radiator cap ($10) (does this come with the radiator?)
- 1 radiator drain plug ($10) (does this come with the radiator?)
- 1 engine block water drain plug ($5)
- 1 engine block water drain plug crush washer
- 1 coolant reservoir mounting clip ($5)

Suppliers:
These seem to be the top three for this type of parts:
EACTuning/OEMBimmerparts/AutoHauzAZ;
Note: EACTuning will meet prices (dunno about the other two)

Last edited by bluebee; 07-29-2010 at 11:09 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #67  
Old 07-27-2010, 08:10 PM
pleiades pleiades is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: .
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 2,214
Mein Auto: .
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee
Too bad I didn't have some spare cooling system and belt drive parts 'cuz it's a shame not to replace them now that it's all ripped open.
Of course, you can focus on these other things another day. Might be wise to do one DIY at a time....

That said ... Your local BMW dealership's pricing for some e39 cooling system parts will likely be close to the going market (call 'em!), plus, they're genuine BMW, the best you can put in there, and warranted, so don't fret over a few bucks if you can change any cooling system parts out now that you have everything opened up. I had more resistance from the old hoses than anything else.... learned that wiggling them off slowly is the only safe way to avoid cracked plastic and torn rubber. I've only done this -once- but some details are a matter of focusing on the space you have and the shape of the part you're trying to mess with. No DIY can cover all that.

Water your plants some more....

Last edited by pleiades; 07-27-2010 at 08:11 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #68  
Old 07-27-2010, 08:15 PM
dalekressin's Avatar
dalekressin dalekressin is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Oshkosh Wisconsin
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6,007
Mein Auto: 2010 M3
Blue I'll remember to water the plants to reduce frustration.
__________________
94 530i sold (That was difficult for me)
01 530i >144,500+ miles SOLD
06 330XI winter's especially fun drive (SOLD)
10 M3 Sedan (sweet)
13 Nissan GT-R Black Edition
14 Porsche Cayenne Platinum Diesel

BMWCCA 4215
Reply With Quote
  #69  
Old 07-27-2010, 08:20 PM
dms540i's Avatar
dms540i dms540i is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Massachusetts
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 539
Mein Auto: 1999 BMW 540iA
I'm ready to go out and buy a spare alternator right now to have it on the shelf for when I need it in a hurry . . .
__________________
BMWCCA#401441
Reply With Quote
  #70  
Old 07-27-2010, 08:41 PM
540 M-Sport's Avatar
540 M-Sport 540 M-Sport is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Seattle, WA
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 4,930
Mein Auto: 01' 540 M-Sport cdn, F355
Bluebee,
Don't worry yourself with the power steering hose that is "wet" under the reservoir. I repeatedly replaced the oem clamps (which you have) with high quality german Wurth brand clamps that use a 6mm nut driver and they STILL weep a bit. I thought maybe the reservior had a crack so I even replaced that...still weeps. I spoke to a BMW tech and he said it is very hard to get them not to. If you want to try, here is what to do:
1) Suction out as much fluid as possible.
2) Use a needle nose plier to take the oem clamp apart.
3) Trim 1 cm off the hose, so you have fresh hose to clamp with, in case the original section has swelled.
4) Install a suitable replacement clamp. The typical ones at a autoparts store are not recommended...I was told use "solid" type clamps from Germany or Italy...not the typical hose clamps with the slots in them.
5) Refill with the fluid of your choice...I use Mobil 1 ATF.
__________________
Factory M-Sport package with factory installed M-tech bumpers, factory Bluetooth, factory M-Audio 10" dual voice coil subs, Homelink, M5 rear stabilizer bar, Bilstein B14 PSS coil overs, Stop Tech ss brake lines, Akebono Euro Ceramic brake pads, oem Brembo and Zimmerman rotors, Dinan Stage 1 software, Strong Strut front upper stress bar.
Reply With Quote
  #71  
Old 07-27-2010, 08:49 PM
Jason5driver's Avatar
Jason5driver Jason5driver is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Middle of a corn field
 
Join Date: May 2007
Posts: 4,465
Mein Auto: E39 hamster w/ pin-wheel
http://picasaweb.google.com/mmm525i/...sionerInstall#
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #72  
Old 07-27-2010, 09:38 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Quote:
Originally Posted by 540 M-Sport View Post
I was told use "solid" type clamps from Germany or Italy...not the typical hose clamps with the slots in them.
If I look for the "solid" type hose clamp, what size hose do you think that is.
(I'd guess about an inch in outside diameter.)

Do THESE look like the right "solid" type hose clamps?

Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	hose_clamps.gif
Views:	1139
Size:	121.3 KB
ID:	240026   Click image for larger version

Name:	Oetiker Clamps, Stepless Ea.._Page_1.jpg
Views:	80
Size:	152.9 KB
ID:	240027   Click image for larger version

Name:	Oetiker Clamps, Stepless Ea.._Page_2.jpg
Views:	97
Size:	103.5 KB
ID:	240028   Click image for larger version

Name:	Oetiker Clamps, Stepless Ea.._Page_3.jpg
Views:	84
Size:	43.3 KB
ID:	240029  
Reply With Quote
  #73  
Old 07-27-2010, 09:59 PM
mmm635's Avatar
mmm635 mmm635 is offline
Officially Welcomed to the 'Fest
Location: Jackson, MS
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 1,179
Mein Auto: '02 525i Sp/5, 95 FJ80 LC
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
If I look for the "solid" type hose clamp, what size hose do you think that is.
(I'd guess about an inch in outside diameter.)

Do THESE look like the right "solid" type hose clamps?
No. you need to use a special tool to get those on and off.

I would recommend clicking on the following link and check out all of the different sizes of these German made hose clamps. They are solid and smooth and will not hurt the hoses. The clamps you buy at Autozone are cheaper and the worm gear teeth tend to dig in the rubber hose - stay away from these. I have a about four different sizes and they came in bags of 10. So, it is nice to have high quality clamps in your parts bin. I use them all the time on my cars and many of my friends' cars.

http://www.autohausaz.com/search/pro...2@Hose%20Clamp


Edit...just realized you had more photos in your post. Anyhow, Oetiker is man. of the clamps in my link and you should be good to go. Click on the various pictures and you will see that some of the worm drive clamps are smooth on the inner diameter. http://www.hweckhardt.com/clamps/new...e%20Clamps.htm
__________________

Last edited by mmm635; 07-27-2010 at 10:07 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #74  
Old 07-27-2010, 10:43 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmm635 View Post
Oetiker is man. of the clamps in my link
I'll look, tomorrow, at the auto parts store, to see if they have the "solid" clamps, but, I suspect I'll have to order one.

I think the real problem will be ordering just 1 clamp (or a small set of clamps).
Reply With Quote
  #75  
Old 07-27-2010, 11:08 PM
bluebee's Avatar
bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 21,026
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
How do we remove the pulley from the alternator?

I called around and some parts places sell the alternator sans the pulley.
Most (if not all) have an appreciable core charge, so, I have to remove the pulley from the old alternator and put it on the new alternator.

The Bentleys (which have been wrong a lot lately) say I need:
- alternator pulley nut removal tool BMW 12.7.110

May I ask:
Do I need that tool (I don't have it); or can I remove the alternator pulley using normal tools?

Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks


Forum Navigation
Go Back   Bimmerfest - BMW Forums > BMW Model Discussions > 5 Series > E39 (1997 - 2003)
Today's Posts Search
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



Forum Jump


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 05:52 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
© 2001-2011 performanceIX, Inc. All Rights Reserved .: guidelines .:. privacy .:. terms