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E39 (1997 - 2003)
The BMW 5-Series (E39 chassis) was introduced in the United States as a 1997 model year car and lasted until the 2004 when the E60 chassis was released. The United States saw several variations including the 525i, 528i, 530i and 540i. -- View the E39 Wiki

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  #176  
Old 12-04-2011, 06:58 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Some people are running into problems getting their water-cooled alternators tested at Autozone:
- E39 (1997 - 2003) > Alternator failure

Quote:
Originally Posted by JimLev View Post
AutoZone's cross reference hook up book for the water cooled alternator calls for them to use cable #xxx?? which doesn't connect to this alternator. He looked at every connector he had and none of them fit.

He then told me they couldn't test them.
So, I opened a thread just now so that we can find the list of cables/adapters needed for all the E39 alternator variants:
- If you have your alternator tested at Autozone - please tell us which cables/adapters

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
JimLev found out the hard way that not all Autozone stores carry the necessary cables/adapters to test the water-cooled E39 alternators.

Since you're often imobilized with the alternator out, & so that that the NEXT person can simply CALL ahead to determine whether their local Autozone has the RIGHT cables in stock ...

May we ask in this thread that the next few people who go to Autozone to get their alternators tested list below what the cable part numbers turn out to be, particularly for the water-cooled E39 variants?

- M54 Bosch 120: P/N=12281 Adapter=N-09
- M54 Valeo 120: P/N=? Adapter=?
- S62 Bosch 160: P/N=? Adapter=?
- S62 Valeo 160: P/N=? Adapter=?
- ? other alternators ?
Once this table is completed, anyone can call ahead to see if their local Autozone has the right cable to test their alternator.
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  #177  
Old 12-05-2011, 03:52 PM
windsmith windsmith is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
Once this table is completed, anyone can call ahead to see if their local Autozone has the right cable to test their alternator.
This is somewhat unnecessary. There should be no need to remove your alternator and schlep it down to Autozone just to see if it's working. If you have a voltmeter, you can test your own alternator this way (you can also use the OBC cluster voltage reading if you don't have a voltmeter):

With the car off, connect the voltmeter to your battery. you should have at least 12 volts. If you don't, then charge your battery before proceeding.

After charging your battery for at least 12 hours, if you still don't have 12 volts after disconnecting the charger, then replace the battery because it is bad (assuming that your charger is working properly).

Note the voltage reading.

Start the car.

Briefly run the engine at 1000 rpm (5 seconds or so).

Now note the voltage reading with the engine running. It should be higher than the reading that you noted with the engine off, and at least 12.8 volts. It should be around 13.5 volts, but no higher than 14 volts. If it is less than 12.8 then your alternator is MOST LIKELY bad. If it is OVER 14 volts, then your alternator IS bad. If less than 12.8, then continue.

Turn on your high beam headlights and climate control fan running on the highest setting. Note the voltage reading. If it is less than the engine off reading or less than 12.5 volts, then your alternator is BAD.

Basically, the alternator keeps the system voltage above the battery voltage while the engine is running. If it doesn't, then it's not doing its job, and the battery is being discharged.

Last edited by windsmith; 12-05-2011 at 03:56 PM.
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  #178  
Old 12-05-2011, 05:48 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by windsmith View Post
If you have a voltmeter, you can test your own alternator this way
Edjack suggested something along similar lines:
Quote:
Originally Posted by edjack View Post
One can test their alt in the privacy of their own driveway, using a DMM.

1. Measure the battery voltage at start of day, with engine off. S/b 12.5V+

2. Start the car and run the engine at 1000 RPM. Battery voltage s/b 14V+

If you have the high cluster, you can use test nr 7.

If, on test 2, the battery voltage does not increase beyond test 1, the alt is not working.
So that others can find this more easily, I'll add it to the testing thread:
- DIY how to test a BMW E39 battery & alternator
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  #179  
Old 07-12-2012, 09:23 PM
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For the cross-linked record, there is a nice 530i mechanical tensioner DIY posted over here today:
-> E39 (1997 - 2003) > DIY: A/C Belt Tensioner Replacement

Quote:
Originally Posted by EconoBox View Post
I did a few searches and see no reference to an M54 530i with MECHANICAL A/C tensioner.
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Your job, in return, is to read the suggested threads, where the best people will always add value to those threads, either by pictures or by descriptions, so the next person with the same problem stands on your shoulders.
See also: E39 Bestlinks & How to easily find what you need
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  #180  
Old 07-20-2012, 09:17 AM
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For the cross-linked record, In addition to post #146 of this thread here is another text DIY, this one for a 2003 530i posted here today:
- E39 (1997 - 2003) > 530i Alternator Replacement Help !

Quote:
Originally Posted by jotscan View Post
Disconnect the negative battery terminal.

Disconnect connector and positive battery terminal from alternator.

Move the air intake muffler / hot film mass meter unit:
Remove the bolt (10mm hex socket) holding the air intake muffler to the car body. Loosen 2 big clamps holding the hoses, one at the engine end (hot film mass meter) and one at the bumper end (air intake muffler).

Disconnect the electrical connector from the hot-film mass meter.

Difficult to remove the vacuum control hoses, best left alone.

Gently jiggle the rubber parts out of their positions.

Rotate the assembly on top of the engine.

Only the air intake muffler / hot film mass meter was moved out of the way to access the alternator.

It is best to remove the shroud and impeller to provide more room and prevent damage to the driver side headlight. Damage to the headlight is a high probability since the access is at this side.

Off load the belt from the alternator using a Torx T50 socket driver (Snap-On Tools #FTX50SE) and short ratcheting wrench turning clockwise (push down) on the tensioner pulley.

Remove alternator’s top and bottom bolts using 16mm or 5/8” hex sockets.
Top bolt is 150mm (approximately 6”) long (idler support). Part #071 199 046 77

Bottom bolt is 125mm (approximately 5”) long (sliding bushing nut). Part #071 199 006 30
PD (Pitch Diameter) shank with captive washer.

Remove bottom bolt first using the long 16mm socket.
It may be difficult to remove the top bolt since the sliding bushing nut was clamped down tight on the clevis caused when the bolt was tightened down.

Retract the sliding bushing nut using a puller.
Puller parts list:
30mm Socket- ½” Drive (Snap-On #TWM30)
M10-1.5 fully threaded hex bolt of the appropriate length. Length based on the thrust bearing washer thickness used. 75mm long bolt used for this system
Washers and thrust bearing.

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/alb...ictureid=28866

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/alb...ictureid=28867

http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/alb...ictureid=28868

Remove top bolt.

Pull alternator out. It should be easy. If it is tight, the sliding bushing nut may still be against the clevis fitting.

Installation:
Ensure the sliding bushing nut is flush with the alternator clevis hole. Slide the alternator in and install the lower bolt. There should be some play before the bolt is tightened. When the bolt is tightened, it will pull the sliding bushing nut to close the gap. Do not tighten.

Install and tighten the top bolt.

Tighten the bottom bolt.

Attach the alternator electrical connections.

Install the belt. Check to make sure belt was installed correctly.

Install the air box assembly, clamps and bolt.

Connect the hot-film mass meter electrical connector.

Partial list of tools used:
Torx T50 socket – 3/8” drive
16mm socket (1 inch long) – 3/8” drive
5/8” socket (2-1/2 long) – 3/8” drive
(5/8 = .625; 16mm = .630”)
Flex handle socket wrench driver – 3/8” drive
16mm ratcheting box wrench
16 mm box wrench
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Each repair should invariably add to our knowledge base by the process of inexorable incrementalism.
Your job, in return, is to read the suggested threads, where the best people will always add value to those threads, either by pictures or by descriptions, so the next person with the same problem stands on your shoulders.
See also: E39 Bestlinks & How to easily find what you need
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  #181  
Old 07-20-2012, 10:39 AM
PAULIN540I PAULIN540I is offline
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I once had a little induction meter that you placed on the wire and it would tell if the alternator
is putting out----
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  #182  
Old 07-21-2012, 07:31 AM
mjbennett9 mjbennett9 is offline
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Ill read the whole thread while drinking coffee on patio...beautiful 90 degree morning. Anyway, car b4 bimmer had those same symptoms. Short of story was it was a fuse in the engine compartment. It would randomly blow out. One mech said it was related to bad ignition switch...which i didnt tell him was giving me problems now n then. I look forward to reading the last page n hopes u resolved the issue.

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  #183  
Old 07-21-2012, 07:35 AM
mjbennett9 mjbennett9 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dms540i View Post
My two cents: TRANS FAILSAFE often is triggered by a bad ignition switch.
+1

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  #184  
Old 07-21-2012, 08:02 AM
mjbennett9 mjbennett9 is offline
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Glad ur hard work paid off BB. Wasnt a fuse or ignition

I do need to tackle belts n tensioner at some point. Theres no excuse after your amazing writeup.

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  #185  
Old 07-22-2012, 06:10 AM
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Flybot Flybot is offline
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Just read through this thread. Now my head hurts.

Glad it all worked out.
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  #186  
Old 07-25-2012, 01:11 PM
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There is good information about pulling the pulley over here today ...
> E39 (1997 - 2003) > How to take off the alternator pulley

Quote:
Originally Posted by doru View Post
What's the best method to take the sucker off?
Tried it with the belt on with no luck. Off the car it's impossible.
And, good information about torque figures over here today:
> E39 (1997 - 2003) > Alternator tightening torque
__________________
Each repair should invariably add to our knowledge base by the process of inexorable incrementalism.
Your job, in return, is to read the suggested threads, where the best people will always add value to those threads, either by pictures or by descriptions, so the next person with the same problem stands on your shoulders.
See also: E39 Bestlinks & How to easily find what you need

Last edited by bluebee; 07-25-2012 at 01:32 PM.
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  #187  
Old 09-12-2012, 07:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
Go to this thread to see the myriad number of places your antifreeze can leak from
Drat. I'm the victim this time!

My cooling system has decided to develop a slow leak, after only two years in play:

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Each repair should invariably add to our knowledge base by the process of inexorable incrementalism.
Your job, in return, is to read the suggested threads, where the best people will always add value to those threads, either by pictures or by descriptions, so the next person with the same problem stands on your shoulders.
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  #188  
Old 09-12-2012, 08:43 AM
z_driver z_driver is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
Drat. I'm the victim this time!

My cooling system has decided to develop a slow leak, after only two years in play:
That's terrible! But I can't believe that you're going to swap out all the cooling components again? You should have a known good baseline now.

btw, because my cap's o rings are so tight I've felt the need to hold the top of the expansion tank while opening/closing it. My worry has been this spot(glued seam) may be vulnerable to the torque necessary to seal it completely.
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Last edited by z_driver; 09-12-2012 at 08:44 AM.
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  #189  
Old 09-13-2012, 05:56 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by z_driver View Post
You should have a known good baseline now.
Good point!
I'm not sure 'what' I'll replace. I have to take the shroud apart first, I think. Sigh. I thought I had more than two years.

Quote:
Originally Posted by z_driver View Post
this spot(glued seam) may be vulnerable to the torque necessary to seal it completely.
That might be something to look at!

EDIT:
So these brand new tips and tricks don't get lost, here's one posted today:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Adamcan2 View Post
Two weeks ago I did a cooling overhaul for my 530i with 123,000 miles on it. I bought a bundle from OEMBimmerparts.com that included:

Nissens Radiator
Expansion Tank
Graf Water Pump w/Metal Impeller
Wahler Thermostat and Housing
Upper and Lower Rad Hoses
Cooling Temp Sensor
a small washer in its own bag

This bundle cost around $430. I spent an evening pricing things out from different suppliers, figuring out what the cost individually would be, etc. It looked like I could have saved about $10 if I sourced all the parts separately, but I was happy to the extra $5 for the convenience of having everything put together and shipped at the same time. In addition, most of the best individual prices that I found were on eBay which is always a bit of a crapshoot.

The day of my fix, I also decided that I should change the Serpentine Belt. This part costs $30 online, but since it was day-of I went to the stealer and paid $61.86. Oh well, better than worrying about it.

I primarily used cn90's excellent DIY for the fix, which can be found here: http://www.bimmerboard.com/forums/posts/199986"]. Besian also has good information about the fan shroud removal at http://www.beisansystems.com/procedu..._procedure.htm. I have heard that Pelican Parts has a good DIY as well but I did not use it. Because there are such great resources out there for this fix, I will not go into it step by step, but will put down a few details that I ran into. I also did the double Vanos during this fix, but I will put my specific experiences on that in a different post.

I recommend getting the serpentine belt and A/C belt if you are going to do this fix. If you plan ahead (unlike I did) you can have both for around $40, and again, peace of mind is why we do these fixes. You will be removing both of these during the course of the work, so it is no extra effort to replace with new.

Another item is the catch pan for coolant. I wasn't sure what size I needed. I ended up using a Rubbermade 3 gallon rectangular container. I only ended up draining about 1.5 gallons of coolant, but to be fair a good amount ended up on the garage floor. I also cleaned this puppy thoroughly after use. Since I had an issue with my fix I had to open everything up again, and having a clean container meant that I could re-use the new coolant when I had to drain it for the second time.

You will need a 32mm wrench for this fix as well. I bought one at a local bike shop for $12. This is also the wrench you will need if you want to fix the headset on your bike. Hooray, double use! I think I saw some posts that said they got away with using a wrench, and while I am sure this is possible, my life was made much easier with the 32mm. Also, if you have a choice of lengths when purchasing this wrench, get the longest one you can find. Mine was a bit short which makes it awkward to smack with a hammer, but even so it is not too bad.

Moving on to the fix, the first item that I was not clear on was how the radiator plug works. It is on the bottom of the radiator on the drivers side, and I guess it is usually blue (mine was). I turned it 90 degrees, as specified, and nothing happened. What you have to do then is pull straight down on it. It will pop out with moderate force, and you will get coolant all over your shirt. Or at least that is what happened with me. If I knew better, I would have positioned myself more out of the way and yanked more firmly. Then I would have only gotten it on my hand. You will get it on your hand.

The second item that gave me a bit of trouble was the hoses themselves. They are held on with a metal clip that is easy to pry up, but even after doing that the hoses can be difficult to dislodge. I wasn't sure if I needed to do something else or not. I did not. Just pull up the clip (half of them will fly off the hoses, but this is no big deal) and start to work that bad boy off. The first hose you take off, the one that connects to the auxiliary water pump, will spray quite a bit of coolant out even after draining the radiator, so be prepared. It comes out with a small amount of pressure so factor that in with your catch pan positioning.

Once you follow the directions and get the fan shroud loose, you get to the dreaded fan removal. I have removed this thing several times now, and it has been different every time. I assume it is because the fan is "clutched", so depending on the clutch position the fan may spin easily or it may not spin much at all. At any rate, the method described is exactly right--put the wrench on and hit is with the hammer. It is reverse threaded so you want to go righty-loosy. A snap of the wrist is better than a wind up power shot. You don't need power, you need pop. Two out of the three times that I removed the fan I popped it and then spun the fan to remove it, but the other time I couldn't spin the fan and had to use the wrench the whole way. It sucked, but it worked. I also had some trouble lining up the threads when I went to put the fan back on. Just keep at it, and know that this part is (normally) the biggest PITA in the whole project.

When I got to the Serpentine belt I was having some trouble removing it. The DIY says to use an allen wrench in the middle of the tensioner pulley to release the tension. I did not have a wrench that would fit. What I did find was a 16mm (I think) bolt head cast into the tensioner arm. I was able to use this to release the tension. It seemed easier to me than working with the rather small hole in the middle of the tensioner pully. The only other detail here is that when you release the tension the instructions are to put a drill bit into the holes that line up above the tensioner pulley to keep the belt slack. This works well, but you definitely want to put in the largest drill bit that will fit in the hole. I started out with a drill bit one or two sizes smaller than the hole, and that half millimeter made it so I couldn't release the belt.

Another issue that I ran into was the coolant temperature sensor that goes on the lower radiator hose. It didn't feel tight when I put it in, and I had this washer in a bag all by itself for which I did not have a purpose. Since the washer fit into the socket for the sensor, I put it in and replaced the sensor. I must have pushed too hard because I broke the housing of the sensor. It didn't leak any more, but I was throwing the code for that sensor--sorry I can't remember what the code was. I ended up buying another sensor and installing it without the washer, and no more code.

My last issue outside of the DIYs was that once I buttoned it all up, I was getting coolant leaking from behind the serpentine belt. I couldn't tell if it was the thermostat or the water pump. I posted a question about it on this forum and got many helpful suggestions, but the reality was that I made a mistake. I have a $20 torque wrench that is a POS. It is one of the beam-style ones. When I was replacing the Vanos during this fix, I broke a post from torquing it too hard, because to my eye the torque wrench had not reached the recommended N/m. Because of this I was way too careful when I installed the thermostat, and didn't bolt it back in strongly enough. When I finally inspected the thermostat I could turn the bolts with my fingers! I torqued this back down and everything was fine.

Based on my experience I strongly suggest getting a digital torque wrench. Sure, it costs $100 or more, but if you are a DIY person, tools don't cost you money, they save you money. Add that onto the fact that you will use this tool with nearly every fix you do, and the $100 seems pretty worth it.

To finish, a quick question: what is that little washer for? While it fits in the temp sensor socket, the bottom of the sensor is pointed rather than flat, so it doesn't seem like it is made for that application. With the new sensor that I put in without the washer I am getting random droplets of coolant leaking out. Not much leakage--maybe 2-3 drops on a 10 mile journey--but it seems the seal is not as good as it should be. Is that actually what the washer is for? Was I just being too much of a boy when I shoved the first sensor in and broke it?

Thanks to everyone for their posts and DIYs. This was a fun fix and I am feeling much better about my cooling system. I am running consistently 93 degrees C on the high cluster and I can just tell my car is much happier.

--Adam
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post

Here's the puddle ...


So I started looking for the telltale white spots:

And, watching for a while, I found the culprit!


Note: I last replaced my Behr expansion tank in 2010 as noted by the markings on the side.
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Each repair should invariably add to our knowledge base by the process of inexorable incrementalism.
Your job, in return, is to read the suggested threads, where the best people will always add value to those threads, either by pictures or by descriptions, so the next person with the same problem stands on your shoulders.
See also: E39 Bestlinks & How to easily find what you need
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  #190  
Old 09-15-2012, 09:08 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
here are hastily written instructions for removal of the fan shroud in the 2002 BMW 525i
For the cross-linked record, this related thread was posted today (which contains useful pictures & advice):
> E39 (1997 - 2003) > Radiator Install Advice

Quote:
Originally Posted by bkgreene39 View Post
I will be attempting to install a new radiator relatively soon in my vehicle, and i have been reading and looking at a lot of the diy links. So i know this will sound stupid but in order to slide out the radiator, the fan clutch with fan and cowl must be removed correct? Also since its an auto the transmission hoses must be detached as well?
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Each repair should invariably add to our knowledge base by the process of inexorable incrementalism.
Your job, in return, is to read the suggested threads, where the best people will always add value to those threads, either by pictures or by descriptions, so the next person with the same problem stands on your shoulders.
See also: E39 Bestlinks & How to easily find what you need
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  #191  
Old 09-16-2012, 10:05 PM
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Coochie_Bandit Coochie_Bandit is offline
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Ive been reading looking through this thread for days.. I might the having the same problem. My water cooled alt is starting to go. It still re charges the battery. But I believe a bearing in the alt could be the culprit. What are my symptoms you may ask? Car shuts off @ less than 1k rpm.
Ex: stop and go traffic.
Ive had this issue for about a month now but its starting get more common. Its getting to the point where I expect it to turn off when RPm's dip below 1k.
Its still charging the battery but I feel sooner or later its going to stop doing that as well and inevitably not start either. I havnt ordered a new one yet because I'd like to get some input so I can be sure thats what it is and that I dont have some other electrical grimlins.
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  #192  
Old 09-17-2012, 03:34 AM
Quick99Si Quick99Si is offline
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It's probably a bit late to chime in, but for what it's worth, I experienced almost the same battery symptoms in my M3. It died at a toll booth in Ohio (gate broke down so we Al parked), and we had to push it in the busy interstate.

Cause: loose battery cables in the trunk that definitely didn't look loose upon inspection. Thanks PO!
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  #193  
Old 09-17-2012, 08:35 AM
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Coochie_Bandit Coochie_Bandit is offline
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No I dont believe it's ever too late to chime in on a good thread. I mean god forbid I start a new one stating the same problems. We all know how butt-hurt some on here would get. :-)

But thanks for replying. I will tighten my terminals and see if it helps.
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  #194  
Old 09-21-2012, 11:25 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Speaking of chiming in on an old thread, it looks like a newbie today had almost the exact same experience as I did when his alternator went out, just like mine:
> E39 (1997 - 2003) > .....I'm dead. Car died Nee Help...big time, Plzzz Help....

Quote:
Originally Posted by Newbie528 View Post
I had just written a thread a couple of weeks ago, about my car reaching 160k miles, and I was beginning to worry of the upcoming issues...specially tranny.

Well, it happened today. I stopped at a store, car wouldn't start. Gas was totally out, so I bought a can & poured 5 gallons of gas. Still won't start, but a little clicking noise. I thought battery is down. Got a jump and out started. But was getting brake light, traction light, ABS light flashing. I didn't stop but kept driving. In a little while I get a mssg "Trans failure"..."PROG...safe mode"... Car would not pull...very slow. In a few minutes totally died. Wouldn't start at all. Not even idle... Wth...

Does any of this relate to anything? Makes sense? What is this, and what are my options?

Plz Help.....I'm dying inside. No car for work...
2001 530i, 160k miles..

Thanks in advance!
And, when told it was likely the alternator ...
Quote:
Originally Posted by Newbie528 View Post
You may be right...because I jumped it 5 mins ago, going from the trunk, it started. But died again in another 5 mins of idle. Would a bad alternator have such signs.... And what does it have to do with the tranny... And "trans failure" message...???...

Also, no prior warnings....just bang...
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  #195  
Old 09-26-2012, 05:44 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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I just went through this thread to cull out the three DIY posts to help this guy today:
- > E39 (1997 - 2003) > Alternator Replace 2003 530

These are the three DIY posts:
- Read post #66 and post #107 and especially post #146
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  #196  
Old 04-05-2013, 09:44 PM
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bin01123 bin01123 is offline
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bluebee,

So would you say the alternator is a part on the BMWs like the radiotor? Its just bound to fail sometime after 90k. I'm asking because I'm at 94k on my 540 and just completed my cooling system overhaul. I was looking to see what the next part is I should replace before it fails.
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  #197  
Old 04-06-2013, 11:24 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bin01123 View Post
would you say the alternator is a part on the BMWs like the radiotor? Its just bound to fail sometime after 90k.
I had asked a similar question to ascertain WHY our alternators fail:
- Does an ATF leak onto the alternator cause it to fail? Can we test if this is true?

And, of course, I've asked how to TEST a failing alternator:
- DIY how to test a BMW E39 battery & alternator (discussion)

The answers that came back weren't exactly conclusive, so, I can only say that we'd really need more data on what fails on the alternators most:

a) Is it the bearings?
b) The diodes?
c) The regulator?
d) The coils?
etc.

Anecdotally, I'm guessing that most failures are the bearings. If that's the case, then I'd recommend you stock the bearings yourself, well ahead of the time your alternator fails. Luckily, they use standard-sized bearings, so stocking these $5 parts would be easy.

Then, when your alternator finally does fail, you can take it apart and replace the bearings quicker and cheaper than you can if you order a rebuilt alternator (which is what most of us do when faced with the sudden failure).

See also:
- How to test your generator (1) & how to determine exactly what alternator you have (1) & a DIY for replacing the E39 I6 alternator (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) or E39 V8 alternator (1) (2) (3) (4) & why you want to clean out the air-cooled alternator air duct & cooling vents (1) (2) (1) (2) & why rebuilding an alternator is preferable to replacing (1) & cn90 DIYs for rebuilding a 1998 air-cooled BMW Bosch alternator (1) (2) or his VW Bosch alternator (1) & cdawg246's quest for materials for a Bosch water cooled alternator rebuild (1) & Aioros' 1999 Valeo Alternator rebuild DIY (1) and his quest for materials (1) & Cn90's explanation of where to get hard-to-get alternator rebuild parts (1) & how to tell from the part number if a replacement alternator is actually rebuilt "by" Bosch (1) & a DIY for replacing the brushes in an (Audi) Valeo alternator (1) & a Bosch alternator bearing replacement from a 1997 MB S600 (1) & from a Range Rover (1).
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  #198  
Old 08-13-2013, 09:43 AM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
Lest I forget, here are the instructions I wrote (and constantly adjusted) for replacing the alternator and belt drive components:
TEXT DIY FOR ALTERNATOR, TENSIONERS, IDLER ROLLER, & BELTS: (July 2010)
For the record, there was a nice picture today of how leaves can clog your air-cooled alternator over here:
> E39 (1997 - 2003) > Alt Replacement

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  #199  
Old 08-17-2013, 12:41 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebee View Post
Lest I forget, here are hastily written instructions for removal of the fan shroud in the 2002 BMW 525i.

I tried to follow the Beisan DIY as much as possible; but I think I snapped MUCH better pictures of some of the steps (e.g., proper removal of the rivets and locations of hoses, etc.) than they did; but you should be able to follow their procedures as well as mine.

Pictures to follow later (I'll append to this post).

REMOVE SHROUD: http://www.beisansystems.com/procedu..._procedure.htm
- Raise the E39 with a jack and put on jack stands (or ramps)
- Remove the under-engine shroud pan (nine #2 Phillips one-twist bolts)
- Draw the hose sequence or snap photos of the underside shroud hose routing.
- Protect your eyes from falling dust with goggles (I didn't and wished I did).
- Locate the auxiliary pump at the bottom driver-side corner of the shroud.
- Disconnect the press-pull auxiliary coolant pump electrical connector
- Slide the auxiliary pump toward the center of the radiator out of the
fan shroud sleeve by lining up the hose in the clamp and tugging gently
- Disconnect both coolant hoses from the fan shroud bottom
- They are held on with two dual-hose clips five single-hose clips, four
of which are on the bottom of the radiator, and one is on the driver's
side about half way up the shroud on the engine side.
- From above, follow the wire out of the auxiliary water pump to the
AUC (stink) sensor on the driver's side in front of the alternator
just under the upper radiator hose elbow.
- Press the plastic clip on the stink sensor connector and pull up to
remove the AUC sensor from the fan shroud.
- Remove the diabolically German 2-inch by 3-inch AUC sensor housing
by wiggling and coercing it, mostly pushing up from the bottom of
the AUC sensor housing and pulling the top of the AUC sensor housing
away from the shroud. Then, once it's a bit loose, switch directions
of force by pushing down on the AUC sensor housing, pulling the bottom
of the AUC sensor housing away from the shroud. You have to just do it.
- With a 3/16th flathead screwdriver pry out (only) the (center)
plastic rivet pin on the driver's side of the shroud near the upper
hose until you can get needle nose pliers on it to pull that center
pin out. Then pry out the base surrounding the center pin.
- Likewise, remove the rivet to the side of the expansion tank.
- Temporarily remove the expansion tank filler cap.
- With two screwdrivers, pry up the escutcheon around the bleeder screw
next to the expansion tank filler cap and remove the escutcheon.
- Replace the expansion tank filler cap.
- Study how the M-shaped rubber seal at the top of the fan shroud sits.
- Pull up on the two-foot long M-shaped seal at the top of the fan shroud.
- Lift the fan shroud up and to the rear of the car; you'll get about 4
inches of room to see the small hose that goes across from the expansion
tank to a nipple on the drivers side.
- BE VERY CAREFUL IN THE NEXT STEP (I broke the nipple right off!)
- Next to the nipple on the driver's side, pry open the original clamp
so that you can remove the hose (I think it's better to dremel it off
because I busted it with very little pressure exerted).
- Remove the fan clutch nut (see separate instructions) with 32mm fan
clutch nut wrench and 48-mm hole spacing fan hub bolt counterhold tool.
- Lift fan shroud and pull fan out toward driver tilting and wiggling
as necessary to get the fan out of the shroud; it will come out aiming
at the driver's steering wheel.
- Beisan says to remove the fan shroud from the engine bay at this point
but I don't see how you can with the expansion tank, it's three hoses,
and the electrical connector on the bottom still connected to the
expansion tank.
- Temporarily remove expansion tank bleed screw with a P3 Phillips
screwdriver.
- Dislodge the expansion tank from the fan shroud by pulling up and
toward the windshield to dislodge the two hoses at the bottom from
the fan shroud.
- Replace the bleed screw with a P3 Phillips screwdriver.
- Pull the drivers side of the fan shroud up and at the same time pull
the bottom hoses of the expansion tank away from the fan shroud.
- Pull the upper expansion tank house through the tunnel in the
fan so that it is not impeding removal of the fan shroud
- Finally, remove the shroud from the engine bay, leaving the expansion
tank still connected to the car.
- Disconnect the frail-looking electrical connector from the bottom of
the expansion tank.
- The Beisans say to place the expansion tank at a high location in the
engine bay but that only made my broken nipple leak more so I put it
at about the same level it was prior.
- As per the Beisans, I tried to keep the expansion tank overflow hose
high to keep coolant from draining out but whenever I raised the expansion
tank, coolant drained out of the broken nipple on the radiator anyway.
Eventually, while I was working on putting the fan on the water
pump, the expansion tank fell to the floor with a full thud, and
I had to jam a branch of wood from my plants into the broken nipple
end on the end of the hose to stave the bleeding mess.
- At this point, the fan is off, the shroud is off, and the expansion
tank is connected but lying on the ground.
- I have access now to the water pump bolt!

Drat. I was replacing the expansion tank, and simply tightening the hose clamp at the expansion tank nipple, when ... snap! The brittle shroud broke off in my hands.
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Each repair should invariably add to our knowledge base by the process of inexorable incrementalism.
Your job, in return, is to read the suggested threads, where the best people will always add value to those threads, either by pictures or by descriptions, so the next person with the same problem stands on your shoulders.
See also: E39 Bestlinks & How to easily find what you need
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  #200  
Old 08-20-2013, 02:40 PM
dissonant dissonant is offline
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Posts: 14
Mein Auto: '99 528 iT
Pictures of the labeling from a Valeo 120A alternator can be found on Aioros' Valeo rebuild at http://www.bimmerfest.com/forums/sho...d.php?t=516680.

There is a white sticker label near on the rear cover, on the side closest to the engine and partially showing on top. The sticker looks like so:



Mine was hard to read so I tried using some rubbing alcohol to clean it up. DO NOT DO THIS! You will be left with a blank white label if you do!!

Alternately, if you take off the air intake box, you can see on the front of the alternator on the right side (driver side of the car) where it says valeo:

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