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E34 (1989 - 1995)

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  #26  
Old 06-29-2013, 10:29 AM
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Originally Posted by Dionte
Are you the one who posted the video Radian?
Yes.
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  #27  
Old 06-29-2013, 10:35 AM
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Mein Auto: 1992 BMW 535i (manual)
Re: E34 535i control & thrust arm replacement (vid & pics)

Cool, I remember seeing it a while back. I also commented on the other video of your 535I and I asked about the muffler.

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  #28  
Old 07-01-2013, 03:14 PM
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Noted -Thanks for the insight........
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  #29  
Old 07-03-2013, 06:40 PM
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Great DIY. However hava question.
How can I remove and press in new M5 bushings in the upper control/thrust arms? Or do i need a press of some sort?
Anyone figured out how to do it with the arms in the car?
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  #30  
Old 07-03-2013, 09:06 PM
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E34 535i control & thrust arm replacement (vid & pics)

You'll have to remove them mate, there is no other way to do it.. As for pressing in and out, well my ones I only had to press in, as I got whole new arms.. A press is ideal but I'm sure you could improvise with a vice!


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  #31  
Old 07-05-2013, 06:43 AM
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Originally Posted by rdc View Post
Great DIY. However hava question.
How can I remove and press in new M5 bushings in the upper control/thrust arms? Or do i need a press of some sort?
Anyone figured out how to do it with the arms in the car?
To "press" anything implies one has access to a formal press. Check around your local machine shops, service centers, or schools.

With most major auto work, there's a break point where not having the right tool simply makes the job not worth your time...bushing R&R is one of them.

There are hydraulic / pneumatic tool sets available to change pretty much any bushing while still on the car, but they are priced well beyond the budget of anyone that's not in business for themselves.



At a minimum, a good ball joint separator is worthwhile tool investment. All vehicles have ball joints. Owning used cars, it's only a matter of time before one will have endure some form of front-end maintenance involving them.

Once the parts are out, the press can easily have its way with them.
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  #32  
Old 07-05-2013, 09:12 AM
rdc rdc is offline
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Location: Lexington, KY
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radian View Post
To "press" anything implies one has access to a formal press. Check around your local machine shops, service centers, or schools.

With most major auto work, there's a break point where not having the right tool simply makes the job not worth your time...bushing R&R is one of them.

There are hydraulic / pneumatic tool sets available to change pretty much any bushing while still on the car, but they are priced well beyond the budget of anyone that's not in business for themselves.



At a minimum, a good ball joint separator is worthwhile tool investment. All vehicles have ball joints. Owning used cars, it's only a matter of time before one will have endure some form of front-end maintenance involving them.

Once the parts are out, the press can easily have its way with them.
Thanks, I thought so. However, there are some DIY methods that are a bit unusual.
I have ball joint tools and i can borrow stuff at Auto zone or Advance so I will at least remove the parts. I assume a machine shop can remove and press in the bushings.
Now I know we can properly torque the bushings over a pit. What other opinions are there?
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Last edited by rdc; 07-06-2013 at 08:10 AM.
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  #33  
Old 07-06-2013, 06:06 AM
snowsled7 snowsled7 is offline
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I simply drove the car up on staggered and stacked 2x6 lumber. My car is stock height, with 2 blocks, ~3", I was able to crawl under and tighten the bushings. I think it is important to pull forward, with the car wieghted and level.
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  #34  
Old 07-06-2013, 08:08 AM
rdc rdc is offline
Russell
Location: Lexington, KY
 
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Originally Posted by snowsled7 View Post
I simply drove the car up on staggered and stacked 2x6 lumber. My car is stock height, with 2 blocks, ~3", I was able to crawl under and tighten the bushings. I think it is important to pull forward, with the car wieghted and level.
Good idea.
I have a set of ramps. I may drive it up on ramps and then jack up the rear to get it level. While I will weight the car in some way, i just do not see why that is critical.
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  #35  
Old 07-06-2013, 08:44 AM
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While I will weight the car in some way, i just do not see why that is critical.
It cinches down the bushings in the correct orientation such that they'll see the least amount of internal shear stress when the suspension is developing maximum compression or tension stress.

Think back to your childhood days when you received your first snake bite or "indian burn". There was a point where twisting your skin any further was going to do major damage (much less have you screaming profanity at your buddies).....and if you'll recall, it only was a matter of one or two degrees of extra twist....not much.



Bushings endure the same hardship, but don't get to whine like a sissy when things go too far. They simply tear internally and their performance and service life is reduced as a result.

All rubber bushings are designed to absorb a certain degree of torsional deflection, but there are limits (which narrow significantly when under complex loads). Correctly orientating them upon installation ensures the deflection occurs within the design limits.
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Last edited by Radian; 07-06-2013 at 08:46 AM.
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  #36  
Old 07-06-2013, 08:52 AM
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BMR_LVR BMR_LVR is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radian View Post
It cinches down the bushings in the correct orientation such that they'll see the least amount of internal shear stress when the suspension is developing maximum compression or tension stress.

Think back to your childhood days when you received your first snake bite or "indian burn". There was a point where twisting your skin any further was going to do major damage (much less have you screaming profanity at your buddies).....and if you'll recall, it only was a matter of one or two degrees of extra twist....not much.



Bushings endure the same hardship, but don't get to whine like a sissy when things go too far. They simply tear internally and their performance and service life is reduced as a result.

All rubber bushings are designed to absorb a certain degree of torsional deflection, but there are limits (which narrow significantly when under complex loads). Correctly orientating them upon installation ensures the deflection occurs within the design limits.
Great explanation Radian

Edit: sorry Radian, I credited the wrong person initially.
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Last edited by BMR_LVR; 07-06-2013 at 02:39 PM.
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  #37  
Old 07-06-2013, 08:55 AM
rdc rdc is offline
Russell
Location: Lexington, KY
 
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Mein Auto: 1995 525iA
Quote:
Originally Posted by Radian View Post
It cinches down the bushings in the correct orientation such that they'll see the least amount of internal shear stress when the suspension is developing maximum compression or tension stress.

Think back to your childhood days when you received your first snake bite or "indian burn". There was a point where twisting your skin any further was going to do major damage (much less have you screaming profanity at your buddies).....and if you'll recall, it only was a matter of one or two degrees of extra twist....not much.



Bushings endure the same hardship, but don't get to whine like a sissy when things go too far. They simply tear internally and their performance and service life is reduced as a result.

All rubber bushings are designed to absorb a certain degree of torsional deflection, but there are limits (which narrow significantly when under complex loads). Correctly orientating them upon installation ensures the deflection occurs within the design limits.
Nice illustration and explaination. I understood the loading of the car weight. I just thought that adding a few pounds like a driver seems to be overkill. Of course it would not be to the original german designers
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Last edited by rdc; 07-06-2013 at 08:57 AM.
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  #38  
Old 09-10-2013, 01:16 AM
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I am doing my thrust arms now with it stripped down and there is no way that fork will budge thrust arm ball joint her, should I just persist or am I missing a direct whack! HELP thanks
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  #39  
Old 09-10-2013, 09:59 AM
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I highly recommend taking the time to find a proper screw-type separator before you end up tweaking the steering arm or strut housing beyond service.


The only time we should ever consider the use of a "pickle fork" to separate a ball joint, is in regards to a solid axle where there are no bushings (ie. the front end of HD trucks & some 4x4s, late 19th-century cars, or tractors).


But....I realize you've got your car torn apart right now and you're up to your elbows in this job, so here's a tip:

Head over to the store and buy a can of compressed air (the type for dusting off computers).

Back at the shop, tip the can upside down and aim the straw directly at the visible portion of the ball joint stud and pull the trigger. Liquid propellant will shoot out.

You want that liquid to target and coat the stud only. When it does, it'll freeze it. Then give joint a few raps with your pickle fork again and see how that helps.
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