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  #1  
Old 10-29-2011, 04:35 PM
Brazuca67 Brazuca67 is offline
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Resetting the adaption module after changing spark plugs on N54 engine?

I am new to Bimmerfest and would like to clarify whether the adaption "module" has to be reset after changing the spark plugs on the N54 engine.

This morning I was ready to do my first spark plug job on my 2007 335i (40,100 miles) when I noticed the "special" spark plug tool I bought online from Sears (14mm, thin wall, 12 point with magnetic ring - made by Schwaben) was not deep enough. I had already removed cab filter, cowl panel, upper engine cover, and coil so I was not happy about it.

Perhaps this was a blessing because, while ordering a new tool, I was checked some postings related to spark plugs for e92 and noticed that some 335i owners experienced SES light and reduced power shortly after changing the spark plugs. They claim the misfire was caused by the adaptation "module" not being reset after new plugs were installed. In addition, resetting this adaption module can only be done with a BT Tool. Well.....I don't have a BT Tool and would like someone to confirm this. I have a Bentley service manual and it does not saying anything about resetting the adapation module following a spark plug job. Please help! Thanks
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Old 10-29-2011, 05:14 PM
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fun2drive fun2drive is offline
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I am planning to change my plugs in a couple weeks at 43K miles by then. I have Carsoft 8.2 so if it is required I can reset it however I find it very hard to believe that changing the spark plugs would cause any adaption issue. I suspect that the coil boot may have been damaged which could alter the charactoristics that the DME is expecting and cause an issue. Pure speculation but I bought a the deep spark plug tool as well and looking forward to changing the plugs...
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  #3  
Old 10-29-2011, 05:19 PM
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galahad05 galahad05 is offline
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I heard that you had to do this--tell the ECU that you have new plugs in. Note that I heard this, unofficially; I'm not sure if this is actually the case.

Reason: The ECU uses the timing/voltage required to fire across the plug gap to figure out how well things are going in the combustion chamber. It has to calibrate itself to the ever-widening spark gap as the plug sees more and more miles. If you suddenly change the plug gap (new plug) and don't tell the computer about it, it will see this as something wrong in the electricals or in the combustion process itself.
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Old 10-29-2011, 06:09 PM
Brazuca67 Brazuca67 is offline
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Thanks for the quick reply, guys.

Galahad05, the reason you presented makes sense but this really sucks. it seems like when you try to save some cash by doing a pretty straight forward job like changing spark plugs you get stuck. You either buy a scanning tool or make a trip to the stealer-ship. By the way, Fun2Drive, if you don't mind, how much does this carsoft 8.2 cost?

My car is still running great with the existing plugs and I wonder if I should wait a bit longer and continue to investigate this. Thanks.
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Old 10-29-2011, 07:15 PM
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galahad05 galahad05 is offline
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No, but the very interesting argument you make (to my mind) is the fact that your shop manual doesn't mention anything about this. This would be a critical step in any spark plug maintenance procedure, and would be nearly criminally irresponsible of the shop manual's publisher not to at least mention.
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Last edited by galahad05; 10-29-2011 at 07:17 PM.
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Old 10-29-2011, 07:39 PM
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galahad05 galahad05 is offline
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Okay, I've looked around at some of the DIY guides floating around on various BMW forums--some from back in 2008: there is NO mention of an ECU reset procedure. Just take out the old plugs, put the new ones in, torque them down to 17 lb.ft. Done.
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Old 10-29-2011, 08:15 PM
ProRail ProRail is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by galahad05 View Post
Okay, I've looked around at some of the DIY guides floating around on various BMW forums--some from back in 2008: there is NO mention of an ECU reset procedure. Just take out the old plugs, put the new ones in, torque them down to 17 lb.ft. Done.
If the new plugs have the same specs as the old plugs, why should there be a problem?
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Old 10-29-2011, 08:25 PM
Brazuca67 Brazuca67 is offline
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Me too. I have been searching in various forums and DIYs since I posted my thread and have noticed the same thing both in the US and abroad. Apparently, this issue hasn't affected many owners. With respect to my service manual, I was under the impression that Bentley Publishers is reputable and produces a decent manual. Go figure! I have no idea why they left the resetting part out.

I have ordered a new special socket and will tackle this project as soon as it has been delivered. If the SES light comes on I guess I'll deal with it later. One would think that such a sofisticated engine control software would eventually realize that the new plugs are ok, if in fact they were installed correctly in those cases, and clear the faults after driving a few miles.
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Old 10-29-2011, 09:09 PM
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galahad05 galahad05 is offline
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Originally Posted by Brazuca67 View Post
Me too. I have been searching in various forums and DIYs since I posted my thread and have noticed the same thing both in the US and abroad. Apparently, this issue hasn't affected many owners. With respect to my service manual, I was under the impression that Bentley Publishers is reputable and produces a decent manual. Go figure! I have no idea why they left the resetting part out.

I have ordered a new special socket and will tackle this project as soon as it has been delivered. If the SES light comes on I guess I'll deal with it later. One would think that such a sofisticated engine control software would eventually realize that the new plugs are ok, if in fact they were installed correctly in those cases, and clear the faults after driving a few miles.
You misunderstand: I was implying that, since they have a reputation for knowing what they're doing, then most likely there isn't an ECU reset procedure involved.
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Old 10-29-2011, 09:15 PM
Brazuca67 Brazuca67 is offline
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Got it. Since Fun2Drive and I will be changing the spark plugs in our vehicles within the next couple of weeks or so, we will see what happens. I will definitely keep you guys posted. Thanks.
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  #11  
Old 10-30-2011, 02:37 PM
523 523 is offline
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Don't believe the hype!

I just did a spark plug change on my 07 335i last week with major diffiiculty. I went through the gambit of analysis after completing the job which resulted in rough idle and a misfire on cylinder #6. I came to discover after further analysis and an additional $100 bucks in diagnostic that the problem was a defective plug. Let me state emphatically from my experience the following:

You do not need to reset adaptations for a spark plug or coil change on a N54 engine. Per my experience and my BMW SA
If you have problems after the job you need to do simple problem analysis to identify the cylinder and or affected plug. More than likely the problem is the "new" plug. Buy 7 just to be sure you have a backup in case 1 is bad.

I spent a week troublehshooting my issue only to find I had a common/uncommon problem with parts - defective out the box. Don't waste your time or money. I hope this information helps you and others on the forum out. Together we will meet the maintenance challenges and win!
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Old 10-31-2011, 11:03 AM
Brazuca67 Brazuca67 is offline
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Great news, 523! Thank you for the reply. I am glad this problem has been resolved. The reason why I posted this thread was because the issues you reported ealier this month and your exchanges with DSXMachina on a different thread.

It was a bit nerve wrecking that your car ran ok for a while before the SES light come on. I am looking forward to changing my spark plugs in a week or so. I'll let you guys know how it goes.
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Old 11-21-2011, 06:59 PM
Brazuca67 Brazuca67 is offline
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Just following up on my last posting. I replaced the spark plugs on my 2007 335i about nine days ago and it's running great. No SES light or power loss. To the contrary, it's more responsive. The plugs came out clean, dry, and little wear. Thanks for all your comments.
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  #14  
Old 11-21-2011, 07:11 PM
zen1 zen1 is offline
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would this be same issue with n52 engine?
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  #15  
Old 11-21-2011, 08:34 PM
ctuna ctuna is offline
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Doesn't disconnecting the battery cause a reset

Aren't adaptation values reset by having the battery disconnected for awhile.
Also for those brave enough there is the Coding option.

http://www.e90post.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?f=368
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  #16  
Old 11-21-2011, 11:54 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ProRail View Post
If the new plugs have the same specs as the old plugs, why should there be a problem?
Probably the same reason you have to Re-Register the Same Exact Battery when you replace...
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Old 11-22-2011, 07:18 AM
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DSXMachina DSXMachina is offline
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Re-read Galahad's posts everyone. There is nothing for you to re-adapt after changing plugs. The powertrain management computer will do it for you in micro-seconds when you restart the car. The Bosch system knows more about what your plugs are doing, and what is going on inside the cylinders during the ignition process, than you can even imagine.
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Old 11-22-2011, 07:42 AM
Brazuca67 Brazuca67 is offline
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Amen! So you guys go out there and start changing your own plugs and saving $$.
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:30 AM
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DSXMachina DSXMachina is offline
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Originally Posted by Brazuca67 View Post
Amen! So you guys go out there and start changing your own plugs and saving $$.
Right. Be sure to start all plugs by hand after putting a bit of anti-seize on the threads. Then torque to spec. This is very important to ensure that the washer is crushed properly which is needed to seal in those 3000+ psi gasses, and yet not over tighten to the point where the cylinder head threads are torn out. That would be a double plus ungood thing to do.
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Old 11-22-2011, 08:56 AM
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rtgirard rtgirard is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DSXMachina View Post
Be sure to start all plugs by hand after putting a bit of anti-seize on the threads. Then torque to spec.
DSX: for spark plug threads, what anti-seize compound do you recommend?
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Old 11-22-2011, 09:24 AM
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There are two basic types, the silver stuff and the copper colored stuff which contains...copper. Use the silver stuff, Permatex Anti-Seize Lubricant. We don't use the copper based product on steel to aluminum (sparkplugs to the cylinder head) because it is my feeling that some corrosion could occur. I might be wrong on that but I've been happy with the silver stuff for decades.
The copper stuff has its uses but I think I'd keep copper away from steel to aluminum. Red metals may accelerate corrosion between the two.
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Old 04-09-2012, 11:34 PM
TomTom1 TomTom1 is offline
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Detail of how to replace spark plug

Hi, I'm new to the DIY, I have a friend will help me doing this along, he is very experience in all kind of car and truck, just before we do this, I'd like to do some homework before we start. I have a 2007 E93 335i. Or perhaps pickup anything that E9x may need to do differently than other brand or model. I watched the otto's video on youtube

, but his example was on a Z3, so I got some question...

1. When "523" said: "I went through the gambit of analysis after completing the job which resulted in rough idle and a misfire on cylinder #6." How can find out which one is misfire, will it display on the dash? or have to have special tool connect up to ECU to see? Or there is other way? And which is one #1 and which is #6? (count from the windshield to the headlight or another way around)

2. Is there any way to spot the defective spark plug even before putting it in?

3. To tighten the spark plug, on this otto's video, he did 1/8 turn pass hand tight, what is our (how much is 17 lb.ft in relation to a turn pass hand tight)? Any different than his example?

4. When "DSXMachina" recommended "Permatex Anti-Seize Lubricant", is it for applying inside of the connector boot end (just like how otto's video using silicon grease)?

5. Is there a kit to buy instead of buying 6 individual coil, plug, and the lubricant? Or, do I have to replace the ignition coil when changing the new spark plug? can I just buy the robber connector boot instead?

Last edited by TomTom1; 04-09-2012 at 11:37 PM.
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  #23  
Old 04-10-2012, 05:05 AM
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Originally Posted by DSXMachina View Post
... and yet not over tighten to the point where the cylinder head threads are torn out. That would be a double plus ungood thing to do.
You know how something happens, really quick, and you realize you just escaped death or something and your body does this involuntary shudder thing?



Well... I just did that.
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Old 04-10-2012, 08:53 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TomTom1 View Post
1. ... How can find out which [cylinder] is misfire, will it display on the dash? or have to have special tool connect up to ECU to see? ... And which is one #1 and which is #6?
You need to connect a diagnostic tool to the OBD port in the driver's footwell. Peake Research makes a popular code reader for BMWs (about $130); it comes with a little booklet that translates the codes. (Understanding them is another matter entirely.) Cylinder #1 is at the front of the engine.

Quote:
2. Is there any way to spot the defective spark plug even before putting it in?
Yes: If it looks broken, it's broken. It could have internal damage or defects but defective plugs are fairly rare in my experience. However: Do not drop, bend, manhandle, fold, spindle or mutilate spark plugs! While not exactly fragile, they are susceptible to damage from sharp impacts. If you drop a plug more than a foot or so onto a hard surface, you may save yourself a ton of aggravation by just tossing it. (For most of us amateurs, it's easier and cheaper than diagnosing a failure later on.)

Quote:
3. To tighten the spark plug, on this otto's video, he did 1/8 turn pass hand tight, what is our (how much is 17 lb.ft in relation to a turn pass hand tight)? Any different than his example?
Yes, it's different: Ignore his example and buy a torque wrench. "Hand tight" can vary between people and engines. Contamination on the threads could make the plug feel tight before it's properly seated and then another 1/8th turn won't be sufficient. Buy a quality torque wrench and have your experienced friend show you the proper technique to use it. Did I mention you should buy a torque wrench?

Quote:
4. When "DSXMachina" recommended "Permatex Anti-Seize Lubricant", is it for applying inside of the connector boot end (just like how otto's video using silicon grease)?
No! Anti-seize compound is electrically conductive and you absolutely do not want it anywhere near the boot, where it can conduct energy away from the plug. Silicone dielectric grease is a non-conductive grease used to lubricate and seal the boot, while preventing it from adhering to the plug insulator.

Anti-seize goes on the threads only, as DSX instructed. Apply a little to the threads on the spark plug and wipe it evenly around the threads (don't leave it in a blob). Avoid getting any on the electrode(s). You only need a thin coat. A dollop 1/4-1/2 the size of a pea is more than plenty.

Quote:
5. Is there a kit to buy instead of buying 6 individual coil, plug, and the lubricant? Or, do I have to replace the ignition coil when changing the new spark plug? can I just buy the robber connector boot instead?
Don't bother replacing coils or boots until they fail, unless you just don't like money. If the rubber boots are not visibly drying out they are probably fine. (If this is your first or second tuneup (<100,000 mi) I highly doubt you'll need any.) Coils typically work great right up to the moment that they don't. Avoid rough handling, especially the connectors, and they can easily last the life of the engine.
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  #25  
Old 04-10-2012, 01:14 PM
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DSXMachina DSXMachina is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zeichen311 View Post
You need to connect a diagnostic tool to the OBD port in the driver's footwell. Peake Research makes a popular code reader for BMWs (about $130); it comes with a little booklet that translates the codes. (Understanding them is another matter entirely.) Cylinder #1 is at the front of the engine.

Yes: If it looks broken, it's broken. It could have internal damage or defects but defective plugs are fairly rare in my experience. However: Do not drop, bend, manhandle, fold, spindle or mutilate spark plugs! While not exactly fragile, they are susceptible to damage from sharp impacts. If you drop a plug more than a foot or so onto a hard surface, you may save yourself a ton of aggravation by just tossing it. (For most of us amateurs, it's easier and cheaper than diagnosing a failure later on.)

Yes, it's different: Ignore his example and buy a torque wrench. "Hand tight" can vary between people and engines. Contamination on the threads could make the plug feel tight before it's properly seated and then another 1/8th turn won't be sufficient. Buy a quality torque wrench and have your experienced friend show you the proper technique to use it. Did I mention you should buy a torque wrench?

No! Anti-seize compound is electrically conductive and you absolutely do not want it anywhere near the boot, where it can conduct energy away from the plug. Silicone dielectric grease is a non-conductive grease used to lubricate and seal the boot, while preventing it from adhering to the plug insulator.

Anti-seize goes on the threads only, as DSX instructed. Apply a little to the threads on the spark plug and wipe it evenly around the threads (don't leave it in a blob). Avoid getting any on the electrode(s). You only need a thin coat. A dollop 1/4-1/2 the size of a pea is more than plenty.

Don't bother replacing coils or boots until they fail, unless you just don't like money. If the rubber boots are not visibly drying out they are probably fine. (If this is your first or second tuneup (<100,000 mi) I highly doubt you'll need any.) Coils typically work great right up to the moment that they don't. Avoid rough handling, especially the connectors, and they can easily last the life of the engine.

Ditto. With one caveat. At 100K I would replace coils and boots. You're right, chances are they would go a lot longer, and certainly a bad coil or boot won't strand you on the side of the road. But if I were going for 200K I would change them all. You can bet they're not going to last that long and eventually they are going to fail.
However, if you only plan on keeping the car 120K or so then only replace what fails, if and when it fails.
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