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Do-It-Yourself H.Q.
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  #1  
Old 02-01-2012, 09:54 PM
Wayne's World Wayne's World is offline
Monkey Wrencher
Location: Easton, PA
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 215
Mein Auto: 2005 325i Sport 5spd
Thumbs up DIY: Water Pump, Thermostat, Hoses & Coolant Flush : X5 3.0 Auto

Cooling System DIY

Note: In this DIY I will be replacing the upper and lower hoses, thermostat, water pump and the aux fan o ring on a 2006 BMW X5 3.0 (M54) Automatic. I did not replace or disconnect the heater hoses. I will also "flush" coolant from the radiator and engine block as much as possible.

Note: This is a pretty straight forward DIY and one of the easier but involved ones. I would suggest reading through this before getting started. This might seem long-winded but that doesn't mean this job is long. I wrote as much detail as I could for your benefit.

Start by gathering all parts and tools. I used:

8mm socket
8mm box wrench/spanner
8mm/#8 Allen key
10mm socket
13mm socket
32mm box wrench/spanner
Needle nose pliers
Large scissors (sheet metal shears)
Long flat-bladed screw driver
Rubber mallet
Catch pans
White lithium grease (optional)

Not pictured below is a gallon of distilled water which you will need to mix the coolant with.



First thing first is you don't need to use ramps for this project as there is already significant clearance under the vehicle.

Remove the air intake duct from the center. Use a plier to remove the 4 pop rivets and set the intake aside. Pull the center pin up and out then remove the rivets.



Next disconnect the electrical connector on the passenger side of the radiator and set it aside by unhooking the larger connector from the fan shroud.



Next remove the 3 pop rivets holding the fan shroud to the radiator.



With the shroud loose, grab your 32mm wrench and secure it to the fan clutch nut. Center it and using something solid like a breaker bar or a large torque wrench strike it (with a motion from left to right) as hard as you can. A couple times and you should feel the nut loosen. There won't be as much resistance when turning it.








Continue to turn the nut loose until you feel the fan drop off the threads. Grabbing both the fan and shroud, wiggle it out of the engine bay, set it aside. Set the fan upright.





With that removed, next remove the plastic under tray. You will need a 10mm socket and an 8mm socket. With all screws removed set it aside leave it on the floor and push it towards the rear of the car.





Now look on the driver underside of the radiator locate the blue drain plug.



Put a tray or pan of some sort underneath to catch the coolant.



Turn the ignition on and set the temperature to 90f on the lowest fan setting. This will get the coolant flowing through the heater core to circulate and come out as well.



Back under the car, start to back the radiator drain plug out. After a steady stream is under way, remove the coolant fill cap from the expansion tank and then the bleed screw and set those aside. Coolant should now be gushing out. I will not be removing the engine block drain plug because it is at the same level as the water pump and therefore when I remove the water pump any coolant that would have come out via the block drain plug, will.





Clip the zip tie holding the wiring harness to the thermostat end of the upper hose.



Next task is to get the drive belt off of the water pump pulley. At this point, take a picture or draw the belt routing scheme if you can't remember it. You will want to pop the dust cover off the tensioner.



This bolt, from what I have read, can vary. It can either be a standard bolt head or something like this that requires an Allen wrench.



The wrench I used is a #8.



I also attached a pipe I had for some more leverage. Turn counter clockwise.




Once you see the belts slacken, pull them off and set it aside. It will still be behind the AC belt but that's ok, we don't need to remove it completely.



With most of the coolant out of the radiator and expansion tank, you can turn the car off now then start removing the hoses. I started with the upper hose at the radiator. First pull the clip up using a plier and I also removed the clip entirely by pulling on one side and bending/stretching it a bit.



Do this for the upper hose at the radiator and the smaller one at the expansion tank.



Then use a screw driver to pry or twist away the hose from the neck of the radiator.



Get creative but don't use excessive force as damaging the plastic neck of the radiator could suck. I wiggled the plastic bit that has the embossed 'KALT' mark on it off the expansion tank to give myself some more room to work.



With the top out, unplug the wiring harness at the thermostat and repeat the process for the upper hose at the thermostat and set the upper hose aside.







Move onto the lower hose and repeat the same process for removing it from the thermostat end but leave the lower hose attached to the radiator and leave the aux fan switch in place.



Next disconnect the auxiliary fan switch wiring harness. This is similar to the harness on the thermostat where you push/squeeze the clip in and pull the harness up to release it. Set it aside.



At this point I decided to not disconnect the lower portion of the hose because as I was fiddling with this hose I saw more coolant coming out of the drain as I squeezed or put air into the hose so I was going to use the lower hose to flush the radiator.

Move onto removing the pulley from the water pump. I used a 10mm socket and box wrench. I put the box wrench on one of the nuts and chocked it against the nearest solid part of the engine. I then used the ratchet to loosen the other 3 bolts. Then I held the pulley and loosened the last bolt. They weren't on very tight. I then had to take a rubber mallet to the pulley and gently tapped it all around to loosen it from the pump. It fell off.



Inspect the pulley for cracks of any sort as this is a known weak point. Replace if you feel it's necessary.

With the pulley off you can either work on removing the water pump or the thermostat as there is lots of room. This requires a 10mm socket but 1 bolt on the thermostat is a 13mm. I found that the water pump was somewhat sealed to the block and a gentle nudge with a rubber mallet did the trick. Place your catch can under the area as lots of coolant will pour out.






Now time for the flushing.

I then took my garden hose to the lower radiator hose and let it run until the fluid coming out of the radiator drain was clear and not the blue-green color. Naturally, move your catch can back under the radiator drain. I also chose to put the hose into the thermostat opening as this circulates through the block and will pour out via the water pump so have something ready to catch that. Repeat the process putting the hose into the expansion tank. It will also empty out via the water pump by way of the heater core hoses. I used a small rag and wrapped it around the expansion tank and thermostat opening to minimize water spray to the rest of the engine bay.

Not many pictures here because I was working solo and didn't want to get my phone wet.

After I got done flushing i removed the aux fan switch that's in the lower hose. This is done by squeezing the clips on the side and pulling up.



Then I removed the lower hose. This one was a real PITA for some reason. Lots of cussing and I took a break. Then came back like the incredible hulk and just started breaking the hose ends off using a screw driver. Eventually I exerted enough force so the top of the hose exposed the lip of the radiator neck and I was able to slip the tip of the screwdriver at the top center position and then by twisting it popped off just like I did for the upper hose. Remaining on the neck of the radiator was the o-ring and an inner collar that belonged to the hose. Check for these as when I tried to re-install the lower hose, I pulled and banged on it until I realized the collar was still on the radiator neck.

From here on out its smooth sailing and reassembling is straight forward. Note that for all connections and o-rings i put a light coating of white lithium grease to aid in sealing.

I first put the water pump in then the thermostat. There are torque values as to how tight these should be but I believe they are low and judging from how loose they were I simply tightened them enough that I didn't have to use a large amount of force.

Next put the pulley on the water pump. Again these don't require a terrible amount of force so I held the pulley in one hand and tightened the bolts using my socket wrench exerting the same amount of force I used on the thermostat and water pump.

Slip the belt back on. I found the best way to do this is to snake it back on all the pulleys except for the alternator. Then release the tension on the tensioner pulley and simply slip it over the alternator pulley.

Now attach the hoses. They will require some effort to secure them all the way in. Raise the clips before pushing them on. Note the upper hose comes with a new bleed screw.

After the lower hose is secured remove the aux fan switch o-ring and replace with the new one. I cleaned it off using some electrical contact cleaner and a paper towel. I also put a tiny bit of white lithium grease on that o-ring as well. Reinsert into the lower hose and secure.

Reattach the thermostat wiring harness and the harness for the aux fan switch.

Now reattach the fan and shroud. You can do this a few ways but I always slip the shroud in first then without securing it, I slip the fan in front of it and then slip both of them further down after some wiggling. To secure the fan initially spin it counterclockwise to try to get it seated on a thread or two. Once you have it there use your 32mm wrench in one hand and with your other hand, hold a blade to the side (left) then tighten. Once this is tight you should feel some resistance from the belts and even see your accessories moving. When you start the car it will tighten the nut some more. The shroud has a few points where it attaches to the radiator. Down below there are 3 tabs that it needs to slip into and on the top left (passenger side) there is a hook of sorts. Once it is seated properly the 3 holes for the rivets will line up at the top. Reinsert the rivets by pulling the pins all the way out and then slipping the rivets in. Then push the pins back in.

Now screw in the radiator drain plug but be VERY gentle as I have had one break on me. And when it breaks, half of it remains inside the radiator so this would easily become a more difficult task. It needs only 1 or 2 turns after you feel it give you some resistance.

Reattach the 'KALT' plate to the expansion tank.

At this point you are ready to fill with coolant. Go ahead and mix a 50-50 batch of coolant and distiller water.

Turn the ignition on and set the temps to 90f (highest) on the lowest fan setting. Then back out the bleed screw on the upper hose just a bit, maybe 3 turns.

Start pouring coolant into the expansion tank. Some will come spilling out of the bleed screw as you are pouring. Keep pouring until the level is correct. Tighten the bleed screw. Allow the coolant to continue to run through the system until the flow coming to the expansion tank from the upper hose is not sputtering with air but is instead a smooth flow. Screw on the expansion tank cap but do not over tighten. Start the car up and let it idle for a period of time, maybe 10 mins. Keep an eye on the temp gauge. Squeaky belts are normal as they are wet.

I chose not to reattach the lower shield or the air intake duct so I could monitor for any leaks over the next few days. Today everywhere will be wet so that's a moot point.

After the car had some time idling I brought up my OBC on my high cluster and pulled up Test7 which reports the coolant temp.

Then I took it out for a spin, taking it easy on the local roads until I got on the highway. Carefully monitor the coolant temp and shut it off if it appears to be getting too hot. Let it cool and make your way back home slowly. If that isn't the case, take it on the highway and assuming the temp is midway on your gauge, really get on it or at least take it to higher engine speeds. I did a 10 mile round trip and the temps were now between 91C & 93C.

After returning home I put my tools away like a good boy and called it a night. In the AM when the car had cooled completely I checked the coolant level and it was perfect.
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2002 Sterling Gray M5
'nuff said

Last edited by Wayne's World; 02-06-2012 at 07:46 PM.
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  #2  
Old 02-02-2012, 11:45 AM
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icuc icuc is offline
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Location: Wisconsin
 
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Posts: 450
Mein Auto: 2012 X5, 2012 MINI ALL4
Awesome and it really helps. Thanks for taking your time to post the work.
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  #3  
Old 02-03-2012, 10:57 PM
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bluebee bluebee is offline
Seek to understand,^Value
Location: San Jose, California
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 22,090
Mein Auto: 02 BMW 525i M54 auto 130K
I have to hand it to you. This is a fantastic DIY!

Personally, I'm going to add a link to here from the E39 bestlinks even though it's not an E39.

Here are the original links (for reference):
- What to look for when your KTMP (1) or coolant temperature gauge indicates overheating (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8) (9) (10) (11) & what to look for in a perfectly normal E39 cooling system (1) & a picture of every failed part in the cooling system (1) & various techniques to properly bleed (1) (2) (3) & refill (1) & drain (1) (2) & flush (1) & what coolant to use (1) & what parts to replace (1) (2) & how to retrofit brass bleeder screws (1) (2) & what special tools to make or buy (1) & how to tell how old your cooling system is (1) (2) & how to test the cooling system auxiliary electrical fan (1) (2) (3) (4) & a DIY for replacing the auxilliary fan (1) (2) (3) & the infamous fuse 75 (1) & the aux fan relay (1) & how to diagnose lack of HVAC/IHKA heater core heat with cooling system (auxiliary pump) at idle (1) & a Behr radiator and Behr/Heat expansion tank autopsy (1) (2) & request for another Behr surge tank autopsy (1) & why new made-in-China Behr/Hella expansion tanks are DOA (1) & E39 Fan shroud removal DIY (Besian) (M54) & some of the better cooling system DIYs (cn90 1997-1998 M54TU) (cn90 V8) (aioros '99-03 M54) (Ågent99 '01 530i) (pelican 3-series) (bluebee M54B25) & tricks to replace the fan clutch nut (1) & lower-hose thermoswitch o-ring (1) & to non-destructively remove the heater hoses (1) or radiator nipple (1) or expansion tank nipple (1) (2) or Oetiker clamp (1) or misplaced thermostat wiring loom (1) or broken bleeder screw (1) & modifying the cooling system pressure cap (1), or using propanol-based zero-pressure fluids like NPG+ (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) or all-aluminum cooling system parts by Zionsville (1) (2) (3) aluminum radiators & what happens if you drive one mile too far with an overheated BMW cooling system (1).
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Please read the suggested threads, where the best always add value to those threads, either by pictures or by descriptions, so the next person with the same problem stands on your shoulders.
See also: E39 Bestlinks & How to easily find what you need
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  #4  
Old 06-02-2012, 12:32 AM
CarZar CarZar is offline
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Location: Bay Area, Ca
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Posts: 13
Mein Auto: 2004 X5, 2004 G35
Great write up, i am planning to change the lower radiator hose as it is leaking from the top connector. Right now the leak seems to be only from the lower hose,
Do you think i should replace both radiator hoses, water pump and a thermostat as you and lot of other people on the forums suggest? I have a 2004 m54 with 78k miles on it.
During the leak detection process and filling the expansion tank several times i dripped lot of coolant on the belts, do you suggest changing them as well? Not sure if coolant affects the belts. Both belts were changed 30k miles ago.
You were able to loosen the fan clutch using just a wrench while most of other people suggest using special tool to hold the water pump pulley, is it easy using just a wrench?

Again, your DIY is a great resource for the BMW community, thank you!
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  #5  
Old 06-02-2012, 08:04 AM
Wayne's World Wayne's World is offline
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Location: Easton, PA
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
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Mein Auto: 2005 325i Sport 5spd
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarZar View Post
Right now the leak seems to be only from the lower hose,
Do you think i should replace both radiator hoses, water pump and a thermostat as you and lot of other people on the forums suggest?

Yes, if it's leaking that badly, definitely time to replace and I would do both because if you've never replaced either then they are both of the same age.


Quote:
Originally Posted by CarZar View Post
During the leak detection process and filling the expansion tank several times i dripped lot of coolant on the belts, do you suggest changing them as well? Not sure if coolant affects the belts. Both belts were changed 30k miles ago.
30k miles is low for belts. I wouldn't replace them because of this. The coolant won't affect the belts. It's a lubricant of sorts so if anything the belts might slip a bit until the engine heat dries it off. If you go with this whole procedure, it will be mostly water anyway from the flushing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CarZar View Post
You were able to loosen the fan clutch using just a wrench while most of other people suggest using special tool to hold the water pump pulley, is it easy using just a wrench?
Yep - Just one solid blow clockwise with something like a dead blow hammer, a breaker bar or even your torque wrench if you're in a bind. You could even do it with a long piece of black/gas pipe. Something that you could take a good swing at it and 'shock' it so to speak on the first blow.

Good luck!
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  #6  
Old 06-02-2012, 02:45 PM
CarZar CarZar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne's World View Post
Yes, if it's leaking that badly, definitely time to replace and I would do both because if you've never replaced either then they are both of the same age.
So just the hoses or waterpump and thermostat too?
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  #7  
Old 06-02-2012, 03:04 PM
Wayne's World Wayne's World is offline
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Location: Easton, PA
 
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Mein Auto: 2005 325i Sport 5spd
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarZar View Post
So just the hoses or waterpump and thermostat too?
If its not broke.... It will be eventually. When the time comes somewhere around 100k itll be a good time to drain flush and fill again.

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  #8  
Old 07-01-2012, 09:35 AM
Stevel94 Stevel94 is offline
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How does the tensioner release? I have a 2007 X5, and the set-up looks a little different from your pictures. I think I have identified the tensioner, but when I undo the bolt, it is just coming out, and I do not see any tension releasing.
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  #9  
Old 11-13-2012, 07:56 PM
Wayne's World Wayne's World is offline
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Location: Easton, PA
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevel94 View Post
How does the tensioner release? I have a 2007 X5, and the set-up looks a little different from your pictures. I think I have identified the tensioner, but when I undo the bolt, it is just coming out, and I do not see any tension releasing.
That motor is very different namely because I believe you have an electric water pump. I'd take a stroll over to the E70 forums or xoutpost.com. I just don't want to guide you in the wrong direction if you haven't figured it out already.

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  #10  
Old 12-03-2012, 06:32 AM
Vince_NJ Vince_NJ is offline
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Mein Auto: 2012 X5, 2006 X3
Photos?

I will be changing these parts on a 2006 X3 with an M54 shortly. I assume it can't be much different than the X5. This looks like a great write-up, but I can't see any photos????
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  #11  
Old 12-03-2012, 06:45 AM
Wayne's World Wayne's World is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vince_NJ View Post
I can't see any photos????
I just loaded this in my browser and can see the photos. Maybe try CTRL+F5 or give it some time (depending on your internet speed). If not I can give you the xoutpost.com URL and see if that works? But I don't see what difference that would make.
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  #12  
Old 12-03-2012, 08:42 AM
Vince_NJ Vince_NJ is offline
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I found the xoutpost URL and that didn't work either. Since you can see the photos, it must be my computer or settings. I'll try from home tonight. Thanks.
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  #13  
Old 12-03-2012, 08:50 AM
Wayne's World Wayne's World is offline
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Yeah if you're at work it's possible they're blocking remote/embedded images or just photo-sharing sites all together.
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  #14  
Old 05-04-2013, 01:33 PM
thompsw thompsw is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stevel94 View Post
How does the tensioner release? I have a 2007 X5, and the set-up looks a little different from your pictures. I think I have identified the tensioner, but when I undo the bolt, it is just coming out, and I do not see any tension releasing.
That's exactly what I did, had a hell of a time. When I was finished and was tightening up that allen-head bolt, I realized that turning it clockwise with a short piece of pipe is what releases the tension ... duh ... I'd been turning it counter-clockwise, loosening the bolt !

I took the extra guide pulley off the alternator and then managed to press the belt down enough to get that pulley back into place. Then, when I tightened that Allen Head, I started kicking myself.

I did change the pre-cat O2 sensors, thermostat and water pump today though, so in spite of my stupidity, I did manage to get things done.

Dave.

Last edited by thompsw; 05-04-2013 at 01:38 PM.
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  #15  
Old 01-15-2014, 09:00 PM
breidite breidite is offline
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Location: Illinois
 
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Posts: 4
Mein Auto: X5
Many many thanks for this wonderful post; replaced the thermostat last weekend on my 03 X5 3.0. Now the engine warms up quickly and properly. Plan to replace the pump & others during a nice spring weather.

The thermostat was stuck open, thus it takes a long time to move up the coolant temperature gauge. whether I started to drive or not, the gauge would suddenly jump to RED zone & stayed there till I shutdown and restart the engine. I initially thought it was a faulty coolant temperature sensor.

Also thanks for the trick to turn the 32 mm fan clutch. I beat the wrench quite a number times to loose it.
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  #16  
Old 01-20-2014, 03:20 PM
Wayne's World Wayne's World is offline
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Location: Easton, PA
 
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Posts: 215
Mein Auto: 2005 325i Sport 5spd
Glad to help!
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'nuff said
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