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X5 E53 (1999 - 2006)
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  #1  
Old 08-26-2015, 10:49 AM
MissX5 MissX5 is offline
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Mein Auto: BMW X5
Unhappy Power Steering Hoses HELP!

My car (2004 BMW X5) has been making some funny noise when I make a sharp right turn. I had to take it to Princeton BMW for something else anyway, so I asked them to take a look at it.

They claim that all 3 of my power steering hoses are leaking. Is this possible that all 3 would leak at the same time? The cost for this repair is about $993.28. I get a 15% discount there, so that's some savings, but clearly not enough. Allegedly it's about 3 hours in labor and they charge me $135.00 per hour. I love my car, but I have come to terms that it's an older car, so sinking a ton of money into it, isn't really my plan. I'm not a mechanic, and I can't even begin to figure out how to make repairs on it. My questions are 1. Anyone ever have this experience before? Any advice? 2. Is this really what it costs to make this repair? 3. Does anyone in the Central, NJ area know of an honest repair shop? I typically take my car to BMW for major repairs because they have the 2 year parts and labor warranty. But, if I found an honest shop, I would be more than willing to take it there for a second opinion.

Thanks in advance!
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  #2  
Old 08-26-2015, 02:00 PM
grumpyoldman grumpyoldman is offline
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Location: Western Australia
 
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Mein Auto: 2006 4.4 sports
Replacing the power steering hoses is a pretty straight forward job and can be undertaken by any good mechanic, so doesn't require a BMW specialist to perform the work. I would investigate the source/s of the leak/s by visually inspecting the area/s. The reservoir connections seem to be a major culprit and having just replaced my reservoir recently, I noticed the hose connections at this point had perished badly, thus leaking. The reservoir also has a filter within it, so it's good practice to replace this item and flush all the fluid at the same time, with good quality fully synthetic ATF.
I suggest you purchase the required replacement hoses, some good quality hose clamps, a new reservoir and some quality ATF, then visit a few independent shops that deal with Euro vehicles and ask for a quote. You'll be armed with all the parts required and they may even be able to do the job for you immediately... First though - investigate the source/s of the leak/s yourself - it's not that hard to look around, clean-off the areas then re-inspect for leaking oil.
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66 Valiant slant 6 torqueflite (258K miles original)
68 Valiant slant 6 torqueflite (196K miles original)
71 Dodge Challenger 340 (68K miles original)
86 Dodge Ram 318 auto (86K miles original) on LPG/gas
93 Toyota Landcruiser turbo diesel (the workhorse)
08 Golf tdi six speed manual (the fun economy buzz-box)
09 Chrysler 300C SRT-8 (the thrill machine)
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  #3  
Old 08-26-2015, 03:56 PM
MissX5 MissX5 is offline
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Thanks grumpyoldman! Maybe I will take it to a place locally that someone has recommended in the past. I'm always so weary of repair people though. They all seem so shady. I'll do some you tube searching to check and see what these hoses even look like and what I can find. Honestly, I only know the basics. I can jump my car if needed, replace the oil, add windshield fluid and change the tire. Outside of that, I rely on experts.
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  #4  
Old 08-26-2015, 04:46 PM
grumpyoldman grumpyoldman is offline
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Everyone has strengths and weaknesses - I'm sure you're good at something others aren't so good at...
Really though, this is a pretty straightforward job and can be done by most DIYers or basic mechanics, so shouldn't cost that much. The important thing is to identify the source of the leak/s though, as you don't want to purchase parts/hoses you may not need, or have someone do work that's not required (and you pay for it). I would suggest buying a can of degreaser (about $2) and spray the areas that are contaminated, hose off, let dry, add some ATF (automatic transmission fluid - about $8 for 500 ml) to the reservoir, start the car up, turn the steering back and forth (left/right) a few times, or take for a brief drive, shut it down, open hood and look around for fresh leaks and the sources. It'll take you about 1/2 hour of effort and could potentially save you many hundreds of $$$ by identifying what needs to be done, regardless of whether or not you can do it yourself (tools and skills). At the very least, when you take the car in for the work, you'll be able to talk to the mechanic / repairer with a degree of knowledge / confidence and they in turn, will be less likely to treat you like a 'blonde' / pull the wool / rip you off.
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11/06 4.4i Stirling Grey over Black

66 Valiant slant 6 torqueflite (258K miles original)
68 Valiant slant 6 torqueflite (196K miles original)
71 Dodge Challenger 340 (68K miles original)
86 Dodge Ram 318 auto (86K miles original) on LPG/gas
93 Toyota Landcruiser turbo diesel (the workhorse)
08 Golf tdi six speed manual (the fun economy buzz-box)
09 Chrysler 300C SRT-8 (the thrill machine)
Assorted other work vehicles and farm machines...
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  #5  
Old 08-26-2015, 04:51 PM
grumpyoldman grumpyoldman is offline
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You haven't mentioned if your car is a 3.0 six or V-8 model, but regardless, if you watch this video it'll give you some idea of the area/s you need to pay attention to and what's involved in changing over the power steering reservoir, where the hoses attach to this item (if this is the source of your leaks) etc. Good luck and post back to let us know how you got on.
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11/06 4.4i Stirling Grey over Black

66 Valiant slant 6 torqueflite (258K miles original)
68 Valiant slant 6 torqueflite (196K miles original)
71 Dodge Challenger 340 (68K miles original)
86 Dodge Ram 318 auto (86K miles original) on LPG/gas
93 Toyota Landcruiser turbo diesel (the workhorse)
08 Golf tdi six speed manual (the fun economy buzz-box)
09 Chrysler 300C SRT-8 (the thrill machine)
Assorted other work vehicles and farm machines...
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  #6  
Old 08-26-2015, 05:02 PM
Alika808 Alika808 is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissX5 View Post
Honestly, I only know the basics. I can jump my car if needed, replace the oil, add windshield fluid and change the tire. Outside of that, I rely on experts.
Somehow, all of us started from basic (mechanic) idea. In order to saves money, learn how to DIY and I know there are a lot in Google and Youtube how to do it. Since you can change oil, maybe you have the basic tools too, such as jacks, jacks stand and some wrenches or socket set.
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  #7  
Old 08-26-2015, 06:27 PM
puddinboo puddinboo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissX5 View Post
Thanks grumpyoldman! Maybe I will take it to a place locally that someone has recommended in the past. I'm always so weary of repair people though. They all seem so shady. I'll do some you tube searching to check and see what these hoses even look like and what I can find. Honestly, I only know the basics. I can jump my car if needed, replace the oil, add windshield fluid and change the tire. Outside of that, I rely on experts.
they aren`t that bad to do your self if your mechanically inclined . I`ve been working on cars since I was 15 ,now 43. so I wouldn`t hesitate to do it myself ,but thats me .I don`t like paying $$$`s for labor. and I even have a slipped disc in my neck, where if I reach awkwardly my left arm goes numb and get a pain in my neck.
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  #8  
Old 08-27-2015, 07:51 AM
MissX5 MissX5 is offline
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Location: New Jersey
 
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Mein Auto: BMW X5
Red face

Grumpyoldman - I have a 3.0. I've had a really sweet 2015 loaner car for the last 2 days cause my service guy was getting me pricing on parts. It hasn't taken that long, but he had to leave early due to a family emergency and no one has contacted me. I'm not complaining either! I will probably pick it up today and will definitely try all that you recommended. PS - My strengths are designing! I am a designer!

Thanks Alika808 & puddinboo- I have tons of tools and I've actually kept all sorts of kits from previous BMWs! I've been reading through some of the forums and some of these tips are really great. I probably would have saved myself thousands of dollars over the last 15 years too!

I started reading the thread about the transmission kick. I had that exact problem with my last X5 and the service plan told me I needed a new transmission. It was so old I didn't want to throw anymore money into it. But reading through those comments, I see it could have been an easier fix. This one is at 127K miles and it's started doing that. When you come to a rolling stop or slow down then accelerate some, it kicks like you've been hit in the back. I'm currently learning all about the solenoids, so I am hoping to figure this out as well if it's possible!

Wish me luck!
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  #9  
Old 08-27-2015, 01:02 PM
grumpyoldman grumpyoldman is offline
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Location: Western Australia
 
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Mein Auto: 2006 4.4 sports
Designer eh? That explains heaps.... you use the 'other' side of your brain, are more creative, artistic, as opposed to practical/mechanical (no offense intended).
Yes - there is a wealth of knowledge on this and other forums, and we all learn from the collective input. This, I suppose, is one of the truly great things about the internet.
Keep us posted and in the meantime, GOOD LUCK!
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11/06 4.4i Stirling Grey over Black

66 Valiant slant 6 torqueflite (258K miles original)
68 Valiant slant 6 torqueflite (196K miles original)
71 Dodge Challenger 340 (68K miles original)
86 Dodge Ram 318 auto (86K miles original) on LPG/gas
93 Toyota Landcruiser turbo diesel (the workhorse)
08 Golf tdi six speed manual (the fun economy buzz-box)
09 Chrysler 300C SRT-8 (the thrill machine)
Assorted other work vehicles and farm machines...
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  #10  
Old 08-28-2015, 05:52 AM
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Scott ZHP Scott ZHP is offline
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Location: PA, USA
 
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Mein Auto: 03 ZHP, 01 X5, 73 MGB
The 3.0i has two hoses from the reservoir that are notorious for cracks/leaks. The pair of hoses is about $65, and a new ZF brand fluid reservoir is about $25. One of the hoses is available as an aftermarket brand, the other is not. You'll need three small hose clamps and a quart or two of Synthetic ATF, like Mobil 1. One of the hoses has a snap collar on it that can be a pain to get off without "quick release" hose pliers. You need to slide the plastic locking collar toward the end of the hose to release it. You also need to remove the plastic engine splash shield under the radiator for better access. Use a turkey baster from the dollar store to remove most of the old fluid from the reservior. Probably two hours of labor if you take your time.
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